The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sticky pizza dough after it's been in the freezer

sentur's picture
sentur

Sticky pizza dough after it's been in the freezer

How can I stop pizza from sticking when I put it in the freezer and then defrost it?

I tend to make a batch of 10 pizzas in one go. Let them prove for 24 hours in separate divided dough balls. Then place a piece of non stick paper between each proved ball and put them in a poly bag (2 bases per bag). Then straight into the freezer

Once I defrost them the paper usually sticks to dough quite badly. The paper becomes very soggy and often rips when I try to separate it from the dough.

Is there a better way to store the dough? As the dough structure for pizza is far between when it hasn't been over handled.

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

different ways of doing this.

Instead of the non-stick parchment paper (which is what I'm assuming that you are using), you could try using waxed paper between the dough.  The waxed paper does a better job of blocking transfer of water and oils at lower temperatures, but can't go in to the oven.  This may or may not be an improvement for you (I use the wax paper for meats, but haven't tried it with dough).

Another method is to line separate small bowls / containers with very lightly oiled plastic wrap, drop the proofed dough in and loosely cover with the ends of the wrap, and then freeze (or you could even proof the dough in these).  They freeze quite quickly since they are small, individual dough pieces, so then you can just take the frozen, plastic-wrapped pieces out of the bowls and put them in to freezer bags.  I usually find that I can totally remove the wrap shortly after it comes out of the freezer, and let the dough thaw in a new very lightly oiled container.  I use the 5" disposable aluminum pie plates (like these: https://www.amazon.com/MontoPack-Disposable-Aluminum-Foil-Tart/dp/B01EIPUX4U/ref=sr_1_3/141-8156554-8716667?ie=UTF8&qid=1499613111&sr=8-3&keywords=alu...).  Since they are so thin, they allow for faster freezing, and they take up very little room in my storage cupboard.  I use this method for a quick-freeze of individual portions of thick stews and home-made ice cream, but haven't tried it for dough yet.

I've never made so much dough as you do, so my preference is likely not workable for you (unless you have a massive freezer).  I actually proof and freeze my dough in separate plastic containers, and just leave it in there.  I do fairly small dough balls (300g), so they fit quite nicely in to a 2 or 3 cup container, and I end up freezing 3, so it is quite workable for me.

I hope this helps!

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

You need stronger flours when freezing doughs. Ice Crystals break the dough.

sentur's picture
sentur

I've been using type 00 Italian pasta flour because it's got a bit more protein and strength. Can you recommend something else? 

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Bread flour.

Pasta flour is noto at all high in gluten.