The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Multigrain sourdough with seeds

Cooper's picture
Cooper

Multigrain sourdough with seeds

Well, Passover is over, and leavened bread is back, with the vengeance. :-) Today's creation: sourdough multi-grain bread with seeds. I wish Internet had the ability to transmit the emotion which crunchy crust elicits whole one tastes a slice with good salted Irish butter. 

I started with same sourdough recipe I blogged before, which works well for me.  The only modifications were: I upped the percentage of whole wheat flour a bit, and also added about 1/2% of water because I figured that all the seeds would need it. The seeds included chia, which I understand likes absorbing water, so I could probably easily go with the whole extra 1% of water.  I'll try it next time.

For the seeds mix I used some arbitrary amounts of pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, flax, chia, white sesame, and rolled oats.  I toasted everything lightly on a dry pan, and let them cool completely before adding into the dough after autolyse phase, together with salt and remaining water.  The total amount of seeds weighed after toasting was 88g.

I also sprinkled some oats inside the banneton before I put the dough inside, and a bit more along the sides of the dough ball, between it and the walls of the banneton.  The advantage turned out to be dual: I got oats stuck to the surface of my bread and baking perfectly crunchy, which is what I wanted.  Those same oats also kept the dough completely from sticking to the form, so it practically fell out on its own while I was inverting the form on the cooking sheet. 

Levain (100% hydration) - 50g starter, 50g warm water, 50g  KA WW flour, mixed in the morning and put in warm place.
Water - 295g + 20g more to dissolve salt
Flour - 400g Wegmans AP unbleached (I didn't have any BF on hand) + 50g  KA WW 
Salt - 10g
Flour total 450+75 (from levain) =525g
Water total 315+75 (from levain) =390g 

Baker's math:
AP flour - 81%
WW flour - 19%
Water - 74%
Salt - 1.9%
Various seeds - 1.7%

 

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

This one has to be tasty.  Chia seeds can soak up more than 4 times ther weight in water which is what i usually add to the seeds and let it soak that water up before adding it to the bread so it doesn't steal water from the dough.  This one is a keeper.  Well done and 

Happy baking

Cooper's picture
Cooper

Thank you! So, thr water that chia seeds absorb doesn't get counted into the recipe, right?

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

The chia seeds; once soaked, will turn into a gel like flax seeds do.  They will hold onto their water and not effect the dough being made from a hydration point of view but will effect the baking.   The water in the seeds is vaporized and  is forced out of them into the dough making for more gas to to be trapped and a more open, soft, nmoist crumb results.  That is the same theory for a gruel or porridge bread.

Cooper's picture
Cooper

Are you saying that flax seeds can/should be soaked too ahead of time?  I didn't know that.  In that case, I assume there's no need too toast them before, like I did with pumpkin and sunflower seeds?

Also, with porridge - do you suggest that the oats are soaked and then just mixed into the bread, instead of being added in a dry (actually slightly toasted) form?  And should that be rolled oats, steel-cut oats, or it doesn't really matter?

hreik's picture
hreik

About Flax, I use it all the time when I do my seeded sourdough and yes, the night b/f mixing dough I soak my flax in water. 2-3x water to flax (By weight).

hester

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Yeah, this is fantastic. Could I feature it on the homepage for a bit?

Cooper's picture
Cooper

Thank YOU for this wonderful site!

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

I've also sprinkled rolled oats into my baskets. Adds an extra, pleasing visual dimension to the loaves as demonstrated by your sourdough. All in all, a beautiful bake---crust and crumb, superb. 

Cheers and happy baking,

Mr. Zita

pmccool's picture
pmccool

Having just finished up some pita bread that was practically white with only 33% whole wheat, I think my next bake is going to feature whole grains and seeds.  Thanks for the inspiration!

Paul

Cooper's picture
Cooper

My personal inspiration and ideas come from all the great posts on this site - and pictures too!

bread1965's picture
bread1965

Very well done.. !!

Cooper's picture
Cooper

It turned out very hearty too, like the kinds of breads he had in Ireland, probably because of extra whole wheat flour, oats, and all the grains. We liked this bread a lot, and I am sure I'll be making it again.

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

That is a truly well done bake - the crust, the crumb, the photography --- and glad to hear that the taste was just as outstanding!

You absolutely have earned the front page with this one, especially with what you worked through to get to this point.

Well done!

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

I love that loaf!

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

Wow, that looks so tasty and crunchy, and the crumb is just perfect! Pretty crust too. :) I make a many-seed straight dough, but you've inspired me to do a sourdough now.

Cooper's picture
Cooper

Glad I could help someone with additional inspiration. :-)  G-d knows, I need some now - a post about recent disaster is coming soon. :-)

joc1954's picture
joc1954

It looks so nice that I would love to taste it! The crumb looks really great and has quite even porosity. 

Happy baking, Joze

Yippee's picture
Yippee

and nice photography, too! 

Yippee

Cooper's picture
Cooper

And with regards to photography, despite all of my love for DSLRs, I continue to get amazed by the high quality of photos produced by latest high-end smartphones, combined with default enhancements that the Photos app on Windows 10 performs.

Yippee's picture
Yippee

for food shots.  A good cell phone cam will suffice, I agree. 

AnotherLoaf's picture
AnotherLoaf

Hi Cooper! Congratulations on making the front page. That must be a very rewarding feeling. I wanted to let you know that I had good success with your recipe, and really like the bread a lot. I hardly made any changes, except I left the chia seeds out because I didn't have any. Thank you for the post, and thanks for the recipe. marybeth

 

Cooper's picture
Cooper

Thank you Marybeth, this is wonderful!  A beautiful loaf, and I love the ear! Hopefully it tasted great too! 

teajay's picture
teajay

Long time lurker... Was looking for something to bake this weekend and saw this on the front page, so went for a double recipe. I used sesame, quinoa, sunflower and flax seeds. Soaked the flax seeds in 25g of extra water from your formula. Very good loaf that I would make again... Was also feeling inspired by Marybeth's ear as you can see :)

 

Cooper's picture
Cooper

Thanks teajay, I am glad my posts help someone! They look like wonderful loaves, and the crumb and the ear look very good to my unprofessional eye.  Did you bake them in a Dutch oven?  Just curious.

teajay's picture
teajay

Yes, I did... I use a couple 5qt lodge dutch ovens. I do have a FGM wood oven as well, but I find the results in a dutch oven so good for the amount of effort :)

bytebreader's picture
bytebreader

Flax seeds can't be digested unless they are ground...they're too well sealed for our digestive system, and just go out the other end! ;) You can grind them to your coarse/fine preference using a coffee grinder or food processor (after which all those gorgeous micronutrients will last about a week or two in the fridge).  A little effort, but well worth it, IMO, for all that nutrition!  I usually just keep a mason jar of it in my fridge for baking, sprinkling on breakfast, etc.

Of course, I'm on this page b/c....  Your loaf looks gorgeous, can't wait to try it! :)

Cooper's picture
Cooper

(I wonder, do you make bread one byte at a time? :-) ) I have read that about flax seeds too, but thought that soaking them in water first and then getting them baked in the dough would start breaking them down somewhat.  Is that not the case?  We do grind them for salads etc. so I can certainly do the same when baking.

davina's picture
davina

Does anyone know what flour and method should be used to produce a fine soft crumb bread? i followed exactly a lot of recipes but all turned out dense.  I do not know what went wrong.