The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Simple Sourdough

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Simple Sourdough

Nothing fancy but I baked a couple white sourdough loaves this evening. Around 73% hydration, 65% AP flour, 35% bread flour.

It was sunny and beautiful but still cool today, so they rose too slowly to have them ready for suppertime. I'm looking forward to trying one of them in the morning.

Comments

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

You got awesome oven spring on those! They look delicious! I probably would have baked them darker but can you do that with an all white flour loaf? I don't remember the last time I made an all white flour loaf so that's why I am asking.  

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Yeah, I usually do 15-30% whole grain flour but figured I'd keep it simple this time. It does come out a lot blonder. These were in for nearly an hour at 425.

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

... with such a great rise!

I'd be envious of your sunny weather (it was snowing here), but since you poor folks on the coast only get what - 2, 3 days or so of sunshine amongst all of the rain???  Yeah - it's good that you get a chance to enjoy an occasional sunbeam!

Happy Baking!

Floydm's picture
Floydm

We actually had a pretty cold winter with almost enough snow to feel like we're really living in Canada.  But, yeah, we get more than a bit of rain. Here's our forecast.

I won't complain about those temperatures though!

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

brrr...

As a desert dweller on the other side of the hills, I'm just not used to that kind of humidity.  I feel more cold in 12 degrees with rain than I do at - 12 degrees, sunny, and dry.  It's all what we're used to, eh?!

We're back to the same temps and dry for the rest of this week (with the rain and snow naturally waiting for the weekend to reappear).  At least I don't have the storm pressures whacking out my fermenting / proofing schedules this week...

Stay warm!

HELEN ROUND's picture
HELEN ROUND

Linen Bread Bag From The Quayside CollectionHow do you store your bread? 

When my daughter first started making sourdough, I would take a few slices off it while it was still warm, leave it on the side to cool completely and then put it in a bread bin. Bread doesn't last that long in our house.....but storing it that way didn't do it any favours.....an air free box is the perfect breeding ground for mould as many of you will know!!

Linen is the best way to store bread...traditionally bread was wrapped in a linen tea towel. Linen helps the bread to breathe, it helps to keeps a good crust and is the perfect natural storage solution.

As a textile designer, running a small business in Cornwall, I used these interesting facts to help design and develop a linen bread bag. After testing a fair few designs we came up with this one.

A practical linen bag, big enough to take a home baked or a shop bought loaf, with a cotton tie.... it's not just practical, it looks great in your kitchen too. With a handy side hook for hanging if you are short on space (think camper vans, boat living, shepherds huts and picnics) it is also perfect for serving bread at the table.

Bread bags are now one of our best selling products and have been featured in national press on many occasions....Delicious Magazine love them as do our many customers. They are a must for all bread lovers and bakers as a perfect natural storage solution.

 

Choose from six lovely linen colours and four beautiful hand printed designs, our linen bread bags are all made in our studio in Cornwall.

Buy your linen bread bag here

If you would like further information, please do send me an email or give me a call 01752 822817

 

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Not bad, not bad. They are getting devoured pretty quickly, which is a good indicator!

ElPanadero's picture
ElPanadero

loaves Floyd and lovely crumb. The one on the right looks to me like it was done in a Dutch oven or equivalent. Is my guess correct? Or was that just awesome oven spring?

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I have a couple of cheap enamel pots I use, something like these. I don't preheat them though, just sprinkle the bottom with corn meal or semolina, plop the loaves in and bake them covered for 20 minutes or so, then uncover and bake them the rest of the way.

pitom's picture
pitom

Can you share what's the process of making this kind of bread? I was looking for such light open bread recently.