The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Baking a bread with a protective layer

heyitsmebobbyd's picture
heyitsmebobbyd

Baking a bread with a protective layer

Hi, I am trying to invent a bread with chocolate, dulce de leche and chipotle chili. I am trying to figureout how to bake the loaf without burning the chocolate. I remember seeing someone on The Great Brithish Bake Off baking a bread with a protective layer. Does anyone know what I am talking about, or know how to do this? 

pmccool's picture
pmccool

And is the chocolate solid as it goes into the loaf?  If the answer to both questions is yes, then you can roll the dough out flat before shaping the loaf. Spread the chocolate pieces over the dough, fold the dough two or three times to distribute the chocolate, then shape the loaf.  There probably won't be any chocolate pieces at the loaf's surface.  If there are, pluck them off and push them up into the bottom seam of the loaf.  That should do the trick fo you.

Let us know if you have something different in mind. 

Paul

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

place to start looking...  It's a dried pear fruit bread, more like a fruit cake encased in a sweet dough to prevent burning.

https://www.ecosia.org/images?q=Birnen+brot

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

and see what she can come up with for the Holidays to go along with her Gold Rush Fruitcake!  

Thanks Mini

MonkeyDaddy's picture
MonkeyDaddy

reminds me of a Potiça (pronounced poe-TEET-sah) with all the filling in a boule instead of cinnamon roll style.  Could you roll out your dough then spread the fillings on and roll it up?

I'm making Potiça this year for Christmas -- I can't wait!!  Tastes of my childhood ;-P

MonkeyDaddy's picture
MonkeyDaddy

...no I'm not Slovenian.  My parents grew up in Pueblo, Colorado -- a very heavily blue-collar industry town (biggest steel mill west of the Mississippi in its prime, back in the 40's).  There were a huge number of eastern European immigrants that settled there for the work and my Grandmother was friends with a Slovenian lady.  

Her Potiça recipe is the one we use.  I actually have the original that was given to my mother - still in her handwriting.