The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Flying saucer bread

caryn's picture
caryn

Flying saucer bread

I decided to try the technique in Chad Robertson's Tartine Book No. 3, so I spent several days developing a starter based on his technique rather than using the usual starter that I maintain. So when my levain was ready, I mixed the dough for white-wheat blend.. The consistency seemed very loose, but since I had not made this before, I just decided to continue with the steps. Then this morning, after I had already put the dough in rising baskets, with a lot of difficulty since the dough was so loose, I re-read the recipe. Lo and behold, I had miscalculated and had omitted 250g of bread flour, and it was too late to do anything about it, so I baked the loaves. They are not pretty, but amazingly the flatbread was very tasty with a nice flavor and crumb! Now I can't wait to try again when I will be sure to use the proper amount of flour. Hopefully I will be able to get to the store to get more bread flour in a few days.

Right now I am rather snowed in!l

 

Comments

caryn's picture
caryn

 

STUinlouisa's picture
STUinlouisa

Actually that looks like something that was on purpose. A few dimples and a topping would be an excellent focaccia, but I bet it's tasty without.

caryn's picture
caryn

i thank you for your positive comment. It is true that I really can't consider this a failure. It tastes very good. It has a nice sourdough flavor and othe than the shape, it was a success!  I had some toasted today with cheese, and it was quite enjoyable!  

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

When it comes out ugly I call it rustic and when it is a Frisbee I call it ciabatta.  With so much bread flour missing this was past ciabatta quite a bit..  Usually Chad's breads come it at 78% hydration or so and a wet ciabatta at 95%.  This must have been a new kind of 125% batter bread!

The best rule of thumb is of it tastes good then it is a success.

Happy Baking

caryn's picture
caryn

Dabrownman- I would guess that is how "fallen" chocolate cake came to be. But just the same, I will try not to repeat that 125% hydration experience again!

Now I have a question for you. One of the reasons I decided to try Chad's formula is that, though my "in the pot" breads usually turn out fine, they don't seem to have as high a rise as I have seen here on Fresh Loaf. So, I decided to feed my starter for a few times at 24 hour intervals at warm room temp as he suggests, instead of what I had been doing which was anytime that I was ready to bake, I would feed the starter once after taking it from the refrigerator and allow it to mature for about 7 hours.  I would then refrigerate it and use it within 3 days. In both methods the ratio of starter to flour to water is 1:2:2. In his method the starter is left to mature for 24 hours and then a portion is used to repeat the feelings multiple times, in my method, I feed only once. I end up discarding much more using his method. I  do scale down my quantiles already to reduce the amount thrown away. Do you think that his method may be better? The other difference between the methods is that I usually use the starter from the refrigerator to create the final levain, if it has been fed within 3 days, and in his method, the developed starter is never refrigerated. What is your experience? When I redo this recipe, I may get a better idea, but I am curious what has been your experience. I appreciate your input. Thank you!

-Caryn