The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

It's all about a KitchenAid model G

Wandering_Smoke's picture
Wandering_Smoke

It's all about a KitchenAid model G

Hello everybody. I just bought a 1937 (I think) KitchenAid model G mixer, and it needs a little TLC before I can put it to work. So I'm hoping that the knowledgeable people here can help me out. I'm fairly competent when it comes to mechanical and electrical stuff (though I might not know the proper names for things), so I'll be doing the work myself. Any help, tips, tricks, advice etc you can give is greatly appreciated. Thanks. 

For reference, or if you're just curious, this is the mixer I bought http://www.ebay.com/itm/151637041431/ 

 

First thing's first. Does anybody know where I can find a service manual? 

 

About grease. 

I'm pretty sure the model G was made before any special types of grease. So I'm wondering if should I use bearing grease, like what I use to pack the wheel bearings on my car? Or should I use one of the mixer grease types I've read about in an N50 thread here? If I should use mixer grease, what would you recommend? 

If I need parts, where can I get them? Are some parts interchangeable with a Hobart N50? Are there any particular pieces I should check for wear? 

 

About wiring. 

The mixer I bought obviously needs a new power cable. I was/am a little overly excited about buying the mixer so I jumped the gun and bought this from eBay http://www.ebay.com/itm/121298022405/ The original looks pretty fat, so I'm hoping that will fit without leaving a gap...or being too big. Does anybody know how/if it will fit? What did you use? I saw an N50 with a flame paint job. That one had what looked like a braided steel cable. That would be my #1 choice if I could find one...and if it had an angled plug. I looked for one like it but I couldn't find anything. 

The model G has a cool old fuse. I'm going to leave it in place, but I'm not going to use it. I'm not sure if I should replace it with a modern fuse (internally) or bypass it completely. What would you recommend? 

 

There is one attachment I need/want, but I'm not exactly sure what will work. I want a spiral dough hook. I've seen two that I think might work. And an expensive one that was made for an N50. Would you guys give me some parts numbers of the dough hooks that work, please? 

 

Well, that's all I can think of right now. I want to know everything about the old beast, since I plan to have it for the rest of my life. So please feel free to add any useful information you can think of. Thanks.

BrianK's picture
BrianK

Hello ... the eBay link no longer shows the mixer.  I've searched, and I've found a site that has KitchenAid mixer manuals by model, but I haven't gone through the 240 in the list.  Here's the site, and I hope you'll find the manual. Good luck with your mixer, I saw one of those on YouTube and it looks to be very sturdy.   http://goo.gl/cJ852F

Wandering_Smoke's picture
Wandering_Smoke

That's weird. This site is adding extra crud to the link, so clicking on it doesn't work. Just copy and paste what's on screen. That is the page.

Thanks for the link. I'll check that out now.

kevstev's picture
kevstev

I am basing this off of hearsay and what I have heard in this forum:

Grease- I have heard that at least on some models, the grease is there for life- it never needs to be replaced. In fact I saw a recent rebuild, and was kind of scratching my head when the guy essentially disassembled the thing and removed the tons of grease that had been happily lubricating the parts for decades for no apparent reason other than it struck him as "gross." But hey to each their own. You should use a food grade grease though if you are going to replace it. 

I have also heard that an awesome thing about these mixers is that all accessories are backwards compatible. You should be able to buy a spiral hook today and it should work. If you are really worried, buy one from a local store so you can return it. 

So onto things I have more actual knowledge about. 

Don't bypass the fuse!!! I would leave the one that it came with in there, especially if you like it. Fuses aren't "wear" components, it will still do its job as a fuse just fine. 

As for the cable/plug, the braided thing you saw was likely just a sleeve around a power cord: http://www.ebay.com/sch/items/?_nkw=1%2F2%22+expandable+sleeving&_sacat=&_ex_kw=&_mPrRngCbx=1&_udlo=&_udhi=&_sop=12&_fpos=&_fspt=1&_sadis=&LH_CAds=&rm...
(if that link doesn't work for whatever reason, just search for "braided sleeving" on ebay). The plug that you use is up to you. You probably jumped the gun a bit buying something off of ebay, and you kind of overpaid a bit too. I personally would have either bought  just bought power cable from your nearest hardware store, and just put a plug on the end (http://www.homedepot.com/b/Electrical-Dimmers-Switches-Outlets-Plugs-Connectors/N-5yc1vZc336/Ntk-Extended/Ntt-plug?Ntx=mode+matchpartialmax&NCNI-5) but if you want something molded, you could also look on a site like digikey- here you can specify the style of the connector down the gauge (thickness of the cord). If you can't find it on digikey, you probably won't be able to find it period :)

Digikey link: http://www.digikey.com/product-search/en/cable-assemblies/power-line-cables/1573035?k=power%20cable

I hope this helps!

Wandering_Smoke's picture
Wandering_Smoke

Thanks for responding.

Well, I was always taught to change fluids regularly. I work on old cars and I've seen how old grease changes colors and hardens up. So if that mixer hasn't been serviced in decades, it needs new grease. ...I decided to get a couple tubes of this http://www.ebay.com/itm/280937045063

From what I've been reading about N50s, it's not all exactly compatible. N50 bowls are apparently a little deeper (and either wider or narrower. I forget), so the standard kitchenaid dough hook is too short. I assume the Model G is the same. That's why I asked. ...I want a commercial grade dough hook anyways, and you can't just walk into a store to buy one, as far as I know. But thanks anyways.

I wasn't planning to bypass the fuse completely. I'll get a modern fuse and wire it inside. ...Anyways, I don't know any place to buy spares for that old style fuse. That and the original works. I'd hate to blow it someday and have to throw it away. I'd like to leave it there and keep the illusion that it's still doing something.

Thank you for the Digikey link. Very useful.

alphabet's picture
alphabet

Kitchenaid customer service might help. They might have some service manuals on file. If they don't, there's gotta be at least one old service manual out there somewhere. A diligent and determined search might turn one up. There are folks who collect old kitchen appliances. . . .

Wandering_Smoke's picture
Wandering_Smoke

Thanks. From what I've been reading in my mixer research, KitchenAid customer service goes out of their way to be as unhelpful as possible. ...Just like many other companies these days. So I'll leave that as a last resort lol. Anyways, all I see on their site are user manuals. I actually found a user manual for the Model G, so at least I don't need that anymore.

I've been searching and emailing quite a bit the last couple days. It seems like an N50 service manual might be the closest I'll get. But I'll keep looking. I joined this site because this is where I found the most talk about N50s, and there seem to be a couple Model G owners here too. But if I'm on my own that's ok. This isn't my first unique old project, and I'm sure it won't be the last ;)

Camarie's picture
Camarie

I've been trying to Google that, but with no luck.

Try Googling & downloading a parts catalog & instruction manual for the N-50 mixer. They are pretty much the same other than a few cosmetic details between the two.

doughooker's picture
doughooker
AMatterOfLoadAndDeath's picture
AMatterOfLoadAn...

For starters let me just say that I have an older Hobart N50, and while the N50 is not an identical clone of the Model G, I should imagine they share more similarities than anything KitchenAid now offers. I would make a call to Hobart and talk to their customer service people, as I'm sure you will not be the first person inquiring about their Model G.

Additionally I agree about changing the grease, these machines were designed and made before the concept of built in obsolesce so I totally agree on maintenance. Once again this could most likely be purchased from Hobart but I think anything available that matches with Hobart's specifications would be more than sufficient.

Lastly the fuse, I'm not sure if the amperage or size but think you would have a good luck googling

screw in fuse

plug fuse

Attached is an amazon search I did really fast.
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=plug+fuse

You've bought a fine machine, you're going to have a lot of fun with it.

John :)

Wandering_Smoke's picture
Wandering_Smoke

Thanks for responding.

As far as I know, the only real difference between an N50 and a model G is the motor. N50 being a brushless motor. ...I'm curious if an N50 motor would fit in my model G. That would be a nice little upgrade. There is an electric motor repair shop in town that can make new brushes for the model G motor, so it doesn't really matter. But that would be a useful bit of info for others.

Yeah, saying that a machine never needs servicing, just...doesn't make any sense to me. It's like saying a battery never runs out of juice. Like those hats with lights in them that were advertised on TV a few years ago. I would have bought one but the operator couldn't answer my question of how to change the battery. She said it never needed replaced, and couldn't seem to understand when I said there was no such thing as a battery that never ran out of juice. ...So I didn't buy the hat.

Sorry about the little side story lol. Anyways, I finished regreasing the mixer shortly after I started this thread. Thanks though. I took pictures of every step if anybody wants to see them. I'll probably write a "Model G maintenance" thread one of these days when I've got time to write. As for the fuses, I found out they actually still sell them in stores. I got a box from eBay though.

I LOVE this mixer! ...Saying that about a piece of kitchen equipment sounds weird to me, but I grin every time I look at the thing. I never used to cook anything, but a couple years ago I started getting serious about eating healthy. Including GMO-free. The only way to do that was to make everything myself, from scratch. That includes alot of pizza and bread dough. So this mixer is a real help. And help I can rely on, unlike any new consumer grade appliance. I even got a vintage all metal slicer/shredder attachment for it. Now making a pizza from scratch is practically as easy as cooking a frozen store-bought one :)

doughooker's picture
doughooker

Could you share the fuse data in case someone needs that information in the future? Are you sure they are the correct amperage for this mixer?

barrabob's picture
barrabob

A bracket on the back of my Model G says 8 amp fuse.

woodnut's picture
woodnut

I saved a model G from the scrap heap 25 years ago. It even had the bowl, whisk and flat beater.  The paint was chipped and it was grimy but it worked great until the other day when I was mixing up sausage meat and it stopped rotating.  The motor was still running smoothly.  I removed the load and jiggled the shaft, turned it on and it rotated again but stopped under load.  I imagine I've stripped some teeth off of a gear.

I'm preparing to undertake the rebuild but wanted to search for any guidance available online and finally stumbled onto this site and these great blogs regarding mixers.

I'd be very interested in your 'greasing" photos and was wondering if you had a service manual pdf to share.  I'd be most appreciative for any direction or tips you could provide as well.

Thank you for the consideration!

Wandering_Smoke's picture
Wandering_Smoke

It sounds like you just broke a drive pin (a pin that secures a gear to a shaft). That's an easy fix. If you broke teeth or the gears were grinding bad enough to make it slip, or even close to that, it would sound really bad. Bad enough to make you shut it off immediately lol. I bought a backup/parts mixer where first gear ground that bad. It just needed adjusting though. Anyways, if you did break a pin, I wouldn't run it again until you fix it because if a piece of that pin works its way into the gears you really will break teeth..or worse.

 

I never found a service manual for for KitchenAid model G, so I bought one for Hobart N50 mixers. It turns out that the model older model N50s are exactly the same as model G is inside. Except for the motor, of course. Even modern N50s are only slightly different, and that's basically just the shift lever and how it works. Anyways, I don't have a PDF of the manual, but I could scan the pages and make a PDF for you if you want. But, you should be able to find an N50 manual for free somewhere. If you can't, let me know.

 

I can post the pictures I took if you want, but honestly, pictures won't help you. You just have to get in there and do it lol. It's pretty simple though. You only need the manual as a basic reference. I will give you a couple helpful tips though. ...The punch pins (drive pin) are tapered, so they only go in or out one way. Forcing the one on the planetary, the wrong way, could crack the housing. That's what somebody did to my backup/parts mixer. I was able to have it welded though. And they used the wrong grease. If you're anything like me, you will probably read ALOT of confusing threads and other information about grease, so I'll make it simple for you. Buy two tubes of this http://www.ebay.com/itm/280937045063 DO NOT overgrease it. You'll read some things here that say to fill the gearbox. That is wrong. Overgreasing puts alot of strain on the motor and bearings, and will shorten the life of your mixer. Grease it generously, but leave enough space in the gearbox for the extra grease to be pushed out of the way.

 

If you have any questions, feel free to ask :)

getnyce32's picture
getnyce32

hey ther.e. i'm in the process of putting back a Model G i have been restoring.  I'm down to the wire as i'm giving it as a christmas gift to my sister. 

I'm hoping you can help me out. I forgot to document the wiring.  There is a wiring that goes from the motor to the back end cap.  There there is a wire from the motor to the on off switch.  Then there is a wire from the motor down to the fuse.  Another wire from the switch to the fuse, and then their is my power cable.  Are you able to explain how they all get wired in to the fuse? 

Also, do you sell parts?  i'm need to replace the mechanism in the base that raises and lowers the bowl support

Wandering_Smoke's picture
Wandering_Smoke

Unfortunately those wires aren't color coded so I can't help much at this point. You'll just have to put it back together and flip the switch. You won't hurt it if you did it wrong. However, hooking up the hot wire to the wrong side of the fuse, will effectively bypass it. I'm not an electrician so I can't tell you how to figure out what's what. Sorry.

 

As for parts, just check eBay. A bowl lift from a Hobart N50 should work, but I don't have an N50 so don't quote me on that ;) One of those will have the addition of bowl lockers, which is nice.

getnyce32's picture
getnyce32

Thanks for responding.. I figured it out, I found my notes.. however i dont know where these two screws go.. You wouldn't happen to know would you?

 

http://imgur.com/a/XZvZT

Wandering_Smoke's picture
Wandering_Smoke

I'm not positive, but those look like the screws that hold the shift plate inside the gearbox.

getnyce32's picture
getnyce32

AAAH.. you're right.. they are the screws for the cam plate.. and the screws I used for the cam plate go to planetary gear which I thought I lost.. thanks a ton.. 

Wandering_Smoke's picture
Wandering_Smoke

You're welcome. I'm glad I could help :)

woodnut's picture
woodnut

I suspected it could be a pin as well. Thanks for the pointers on the taper and the grease.  Anything special I need to know about splitting it open? It looks pretty easy and I will track down a manual first.  I have the parts diagram and list from the N50 which is helpful too. 

Don't worry, if I run into a jam I'll reach out to you.  I really appreciate your help!

 

Wandering_Smoke's picture
Wandering_Smoke

There is a good trick for opening it up. If the gearbox is stuck on (which I'm sure it will be), take a towel and fold it over a couple times, then put that on top of the attachment hub and give it a good whack with a hammer. That'll break it loose, then just wiggle the gearbox as you pull, and it should come right off. There is a washer that might fall off of the drive shaft when you do, but it's easy enough to figure out where that goes.

 

Oh, and mark the wires when you take it apart. They aren't color coded so there's no obvious way to wire it up.

 

Best of luck to you. These old mixers are awesome. and they make great DIY projects. I regrease mine once every two years, but I use it every day for something.

getnyce32's picture
getnyce32

I'm just finishing up the rebuild of my Model G .. I took it completely apart, transmission too.  If you have any questions at all let me know.  I can share with you my email.  I also took video of some of my work so I could go back to and reference.  I'm willing to share that with you as well. 

Once you open the gear box it will be PACKED with grease and may look intimidating, but it's not that bad.  From there I would suggest shifting into gear 3 and trying to spin one of the gears by hand.  See if you can figure out whats going wrong. 

Camarie's picture
Camarie

How on earth could a gear be stripped on a Model G?!! These mixers are built like a battleship!

Wandering_Smoke's picture
Wandering_Smoke

It's good to see other model G owners here. And owners who repair and maintain these antiques themselves. There aren't many places we can turn to for help on this stuff. So I'm glad that we have a place like this where we can kinda pool our knowledge and help each other. ...And it's a good thing this site doesn't have or enforce a rule about 'necroing' threads lol.

woodnut's picture
woodnut

Seasons Greetings!

Excellent advice!  I'll dive into this once the Christmas season is past.  Thank you!

barrabob's picture
barrabob

I Have a Model G from the late 1930's and the on/off switch is broken.  I have taken it apart and am baffled on how it works.  There is a broken extension spring that appears to go through the eyelet of the brass "thing" that sits on the switch lever (I am guessing at this).  Any ideas on finding a replacement switch?  Thanks

aMatterOfLoafAndDeath's picture
aMatterOfLoafAn...

Could try contacting your local Hobart dealer. I have a 1969 N50 that I needed parts for, and my local dealer was more than happy to help a noncommercial owner like myself. Best of luck :)

Wandering_Smoke's picture
Wandering_Smoke

A Hobart switch is a good idea. Or you could try to fix the original switch. That's the great thing about the old switches, is that you can fix them if they need it. I took mine apart and cleaned it once, and I'd be happy to take pictures of it so you can see how it's supposed to look. If your spring is broken, and if you live in the US, you might find something that will work in your local Ace Hardware. A little modification might be required though. Other places to look for a spring might be small appliance repair shops, electric motor repair, small engine, or even an auto parts store like Napa.

 

If you do decide to go with a Hobart switch, I would be interested in buying your broken one. Just list it on eBay.

aMatterOfLoafAndDeath's picture
aMatterOfLoafAn...

Perhaps they are the same? I don't have a Model G but still looking for a good deal on one. After speaking to the local Hobart dealer it seems there isn't much difference between my early model N50 and the Model G.

Seems I can't post pics from my phone, if you're interested I can send you pics of my switch so you can see if they are similar enough to pursue sourcing the part from Hobart

Guessing the brass thing looks like a miniature brass barbell? If so, they may be similiar switches.

Thanks for recognizing a quality piece of equipment and going the extra mile to fix it :)

Wandering_Smoke's picture
Wandering_Smoke

It sounds like the switch on your 1969 N50 is exactly the same as the old Model Gs. Brass barbell thing. I have a 1937 Model G...and now a 1931 that I haven't gotten into yet.

 

As for pictures, would links from an image host like Tinypic, work?

aMatterOfLoafAndDeath's picture
aMatterOfLoafAn...

I've never used tinypic, I'll look into it.

Thanks

aMatterOfLoafAndDeath's picture
aMatterOfLoafAn...

 test 1 <a href="http://www.thefreshloaf.com/http://tinypic.com?ref=2iqbclf" target="_blank"><img src="http://www.thefreshloaf.com/http://i68.tinypic.com/2iqbclf.jpg" border="0" alt="Image and video hosting by TinyPic"></a>

test 2

Test 3 http://tinypic.com/m/jj75p4/3

Test 4 http://i68.tinypic.com/2iqbclf.jpg

 

 

Wandering_Smoke's picture
Wandering_Smoke

Ok, that switch is a bit different. But the gear selector is exactly the same. The sliding gear locker plate (whatever it's called) under the switch looks very similar from what I can tell, and the screw holes look like they're in the exact same position. So a Hobart switch might work in a Model G. I'll take mine apart and take pictures tomorrow, with a ruler for more accurate measurement. I don't need a switch, and it sounds like the other guy doesn't either, but that comparison is a good thing to have here for reference.

Camarie's picture
Camarie

The 1st link took me to an unexplained bombardment of annoying pop-ups that I couldn't get away from!!

aMatterOfLoafAndDeath's picture
aMatterOfLoafAn...

Switch plate... IMG Code for Forums & Message Boards - 

barrabob's picture
barrabob

Thanks to all who responded with suggestions about my switch.  I found a comparable spring (just a tad larger OD) at McMaster Carr. ordered it last night and UPS delivered it this afternoon.  Installed it with a little modification and the switch is as good as new.  Now on to tearing the whole mixer down, de-greasing it and the re-greasing it.

Now another question...I found an attachment and am wondering what it is for.  It looks like an upsidedown T and it goes on the center shaft, (like the beater, whisk, or bread hook).  There are 2 porcelain rollers that spin on the center axle (the T part).  I thought it might be for crushing nuts or some other hard matter.  Any ideas?  I'd post a picture, but haven't figured out how.

Thanks again,

bob

 

barrabob's picture
barrabob

Re-reading the posts about grease, I will hold off on changing it out.  When in speeds 2 & 3, my Model G bogs down and stops running then trips the GFI.  I thought the grease in the transmission my have hardened.  It belonged t my mother and hasn't been used in 35 years.  I would love to get a schematic of the thing so I know what I'm dealing with.

Wandering_Smoke's picture
Wandering_Smoke

It could be the grease, or it might need motor brushes. A service manual for older N50s is all you'll need to regrease it. They didn't change much, if anything, in the gearbox in 80 years. But, N50s have brushless motors, and you won't find a manual or schematic for a Model G motor. Electric motors are pretty simple though. You'll know if it was the grease bogging it down once you open it up.

aMatterOfLoafAndDeath's picture
aMatterOfLoafAn...

Just tore down my N50 a couple weeks ago, so all this is fresh in my head. Replaced a worn shaft everything else looked good. I cleaned out the grease and replaced it with MobilGrease FM222. Its a food safe grease. There is a synthetic version, Mobil SHC Polyrex 222, but I couldn't track it down by the tube only by the case. FYI you'll need a tube and a half when using the 14.1oz (200g) tubes. Also have a copy of the service manual if you need it.

Cheers,

John :)

barrabob's picture
barrabob

John,

Thanks for the grease info, I will definitely get a couple of tubes. Also, I would be very interested in a copy of the service manual.

Thanks,

bob

aMatterOfLoafAndDeath's picture
aMatterOfLoafAn...

Hi Bob,

Can't find an easy way to send it to you, but here is a link to a site I think I remember getting my copy from.

https://www.manualslib.com/manual/1005013/Hobart-N-50.html

Page 8 part H, you're not going to have a retaining ring.

Page 10 part C, if you disassemble the tumbler yoke to check for wear you may need a new retainer Part #00-009051 it's about $7.20

Enjoy

Wandering_Smoke's picture
Wandering_Smoke

Awesome! I'm glad you got it fixed.

 

The attachment you have is part of a colander and sieve for Model G or N50 mixers. The type you have is pretty rare. They do show up on eBay every once in a while though.

barrabob's picture
barrabob

Thanks for the ID on the attachment.  I also have the flat bowl and sieve.

woodnut's picture
woodnut

So I have torn down the machine.  There was grease In the motor and everywhere else it shouldn't be.  Surprisingly it all still ran.  I did find some substantial wear on the zero bevel gears and it seems to be missing thrust washers.  I'll also need new rubber feet.  Hoping to take the motor to have new leads attached since I found some melted wire insulation on the rear end of the motor.

I placed a call to Hobart directly and they transferred me to their Philly parts shop.  No help from them.  I was wondering where the "cooperative" parts people might be located.  Any help there would greatly appreciated.

Thanks, WN

aMatterOfLoafAndDeath's picture
aMatterOfLoafAn...

Hi WoodNut,

https://my.hobartcorp.com/resourcecenter/ProductDocumentation/F43056B_Lk.PDF should get you a rough idea of what parts you may be missing.
Additionally try this link https://www.manualslib.com/manual/1005013/Hobart-N-50.html will be helpful.

I called Hobart Service in Fairfield, NJ - 973-227-9265 spoke with Don and he was more than helpful. Just do your homework and make his job easier. When ordering parts, go for a pre 1818XXX serial number. believe they went to the new style in 1974, or there abouts, you want pre 1974. The serial number I gave you will get you into the 1969 ballpark for an N50.

From what I read the motors are different between an N50 and a Model G? Could ask him to go into the oldest book and see if there are similar at that point? If you need motor related parts.

http://pegasuselectricmotors.com/ if you are close may be able to help with motor issues if you are having any. I have suggested them to several friends and had no complaints.

 

Cheers,

John

 

Camarie's picture
Camarie

The first link doesn't work.

woodnut's picture
woodnut

Well I managed to get my machine restored.....finally!  I had to replace the bevel gears and have the motor rewound. I also had it powder coated since the old grey finish was really in bad shape.

I have to credit the kind folks on this site for helping with advice and manuals and if I can ever do the same for another, I surely will try.

Now I can look forward to using this beauty! 

This Model G  serial number is 4143559 .  Any idea when it was built?

Camarie's picture
Camarie

Could you please post a pic of what it looks like now? I'd love to see it!! Also. I would not replace the fuse socket. I'm no electrician or appliance technician, but the fuse is what helps to protect the motor & possibly other circuitry from overheating or burning out.

I got my eye on one also. I want to check it out before doing any restoration work, such as repainting it to help give it a fresh new look!! The machine had paved the way for a newer model back then, which is the N-50 model. it is still in production  today at Hobart!! It's a true KitchenAid model made exclusively by Hobart! That is why I want one. The Kitchenaid models today are mainly junk, except maybe for the older machines styled like the K-5SS & the commercial models, which have a better motor & tranny. 

 

woodnut's picture
woodnut

finished restoration

Camarie,

It turned out very well except I should have replaced all the bushings too.  Because I hadn't, the rotor is shorting out on the armature because of play due to wear.  I have to split the machine again and have those replaced.  Dragging my feet on it since it's kind of tedious.

When it's in working order it's a strong machine.  I used it for years for all sorts of things like grinding meat, juicing tomatoes, making apple sauce, churning butter, and obviously mixing. 

No I never replaced the fuse socket, wasn't planning too, but I did put a smaller fuse in to protect the wiring.  Most N-50 parts seem to work in these.

 

I hope you are able to get one.

Woodnut

Camarie's picture
Camarie

Thanks! I will in 2 weeks if it is still there. I hope so!

But I thought that the Model G & the N-50 use no bushings. They are both supposed to have induction motors. I found a 2-part vid on the model G being taken apart , rebuilt & repainted. It looks just like new again!!

You say that both machines can pretty much use the same parts. That is because they both have the same inner workings. The only difference is that the N-50 has a bubble or dome-shaped cap at the back of the motor, while the Model G has a flat cap, which also is the rear motor mount with a lubricating wick. for the motor.

Camarie's picture
Camarie

is your machine like this with the fuse at the back?

woodnut's picture
woodnut

Yes and it was probably white originally but someone painted it gray at some point and it looked pretty rough.  I wish I had taken a photo of it.

You may be confusing bushings with brushes.  It does have an induction motor, no brushes.  Brass bushings are used where all the wear can occur through or on the soft metal machine housing.  They support the  motor and transmission arbors at the ends and through the housing.

 

Camarie's picture
Camarie

Oh. Sorry for the mix-up. Just checked online & the Model G is still available. The Globe SP08 also has an induction motor. Wanted that one so bad, but I just couldn't get it. Too ridiculously expensive!! Had to settle for the Globe SP 05 model. It was new & at a very good price, so I had to jump on it!!

Camarie's picture
Camarie

Wondering_Smoke, Does the machine that you bought look like THIS?

Yes, this machine & the N-50 have the same identical parts, just about. it was the success of the Model G that lead to the spawning of the N-50. It sold immensely worldwide.

But the price of the thing is really ridiculous, which often leads to consumers greedily scooping up the older used N50s & fixing them up to look like new! Especially after Whirlpool bought the KA division from Hobart & tainted the mixers so badly!!

Camarie's picture
Camarie

Woodnut, here are the 2 restoration vids on the Model G. In the 2nd one, look how incredibly new-looking it is!!

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4jkmt7pOQA

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxcSDdOeIX0

Camarie's picture
Camarie

I bought the old model G from Ebay this morning!! it should be here in about a week or so. I will check it out & do a test run on it, put it through its paces, & then I'll begin the process of cleaning & restoring its appearance to make it look like new again!!

Just couldn't get a used N50 mixer no matter how hard I tried!! Even bid for one & lost it to someone that bid higher!! It's like they were playing games!!

Camarie's picture
Camarie

Here's the front of the mixer.

 

The mixer has just arrived!! I've already tested it on all three speeds. Seems to work fine! At first, I thought the power switch was broken, but the speed lever was between the speeds, causing it not to work. This is a safety feature which aids in the avoidance of changing speeds while the machine is on.

No maintenance is needed other than to lubricate the wick at the back of the motor. I will start working on getting it ready for painting when the other mixer is done with the touchup work. I think I'll paint it blue!

The bowl & beaters that I just got for the other KA mixer that I just painted in orange, are interchangeable with the Model G, So I don't have to get a separate bowl or beaters right away!!

Here it is in the above pic on my kitchen table! I'm testing it to make sure that it runs good.

 

bomo's picture
bomo

This is my 1947 Model G, rescued from a Vermont barn years ago, then completely disassembled, rebuilt, and painted.

The only thing I'm having trouble finding is the paddle. Mine is the original, I'm thinking zinc, probably, as they used to call white metal, but maybe it was once plated. Now no matter how clean it is, it leaves grey smudges on dough. None of the KitchenAid ones are exactly the same size. Too wide, too deep, etc. 

 

Anyone have an idea if there's an exact replacement?

 

Thanks 

Camarie's picture
Camarie

That's a pretty color!! I painted a regular KA bowl-lift model that color! I'm about to finish with the touch-up.

My Model G will be repainted in gray.

 

The flat beater looks like it was washed in the dishwasher. Once that happens, it can't be saved. A new one has to be obtained.

Old Man in the Cave's picture
Old Man in the Cave

The white-metal beaters are zinc, or a zinc/aluminum alloy and were burnished at the factory. Dishwasher detergent corrodes them. I'll put mine in the dishwasher to sanitize them but I just use a few drops of liquid dish washing soap.

Try cleaning them really well and remove the corrosion with a green Scotch-Brite pad (other brands don't work nearly as well). Then buff and polish them. If that doesn't fix them I would nickle plate them.

The N50 paddles and stuff are a half-inch longer than the KitchenAid K5-A and K5SS stuff. I'm wondering if they would work on the Model G....

 

Harold