The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

SJSD with T85

golgi70's picture
golgi70

SJSD with T85

SJSD is a wonderful loaf of mildly acidic sourdough with a most excellent crust and a lovely open crumb from a long cold bulk ferment and minimal handling.  It also works very well for me since I'm limited on space in the fridge.  I can reduce the 24-36 hours in a cold fridge and leave at a slightly warmer temp outside overnight.  Right now that is in the high 40's low 50's.  As winter pushes along it will be colder and I simply just mix it earlier in the evening to give it extra time.  When it's warmer in the evenings during summer I mix it a bit later and once I have some room in the fridge in the AM I move it in the tail end of it's bulk. 

I found out Friday that a friend was doing a crab boil for her birthday and decided to make some bread to go with it.  I had to work with my extra starter for my Levain.  I used the same amount of PF as per usual but a bit more than half was stiff wheat and the remainder my rye sour.  Then i got lazy and didn't want to take out the mill for such a small amount of Wheat so I adjusted.  I cut the WW altogether (minus what's in the starter) and decreased some white flour to add 20% overall Central Milling T85.  

The rest went as per usual.  

1 hour autolyse without the cultures.  

Mix in cultures followed by salt to a very soft and undeveloped dough.  

Bulk 1 hour at room temp with 3 folds @ 20,40, and 60 minutes.  

Then outside to the cool evening air for 12 hours.  

Divide, preshape, rest 1 hour.  Shape to lightly floured couche.  

Proof about 50 mintues.  

Baked 500 with steam for 17 minutes and vented for 25-30 minutes longer.  

 

This might be my best rendition yet.  

Cheers and Happy Healthy Holiday's to All

Josh

 

Comments

nmygarden's picture
nmygarden

Couldn't be better, Josh! These must taste as good as they look.

Happy Holidays!

Cathy

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

SFSD.  Looks like it came out perfect inside3 and out.  Love the bold bake too.  Well done and

Happy baking Josh

squarehead's picture
squarehead

Looks great. Question: after the cold bulk and shape, how do you know you've waited long enough before you bake? Are you waiting for a doubling at that point or has most of the expansion alreDy happened during bulk? I am playing around with cold bulk instead of retarding in basket, but still am learning the differences. Thanks in advance

 

golgi70's picture
golgi70

From shape to bake not doubled.  But from pre-shape to bake probably double.  How do i know when to bake?  I treat these similar to a baguette and get them in while they still spring back to the touch a bit but have relaxed completely.  I'm making again Tuesday and I'll pay more attention to volume change.  

Josh

squarehead's picture
squarehead

Thanks josh. I think my own troubles with cold bulking is in not waiting long enough between mix and cold shape for the yeast levels to get going. I'm mixing and going almost immediately into the fridge, and when it comes back out the next day it hasn't expanded by as much as I would hope for. 

 

squarehead's picture
squarehead

Thanks josh. I think my own troubles with cold bulking is in not waiting long enough between mix and cold shape for the yeast levels to get going. I'm mixing and going almost immediately into the fridge, and when it comes back out the next day it hasn't expanded by as much as I would hope for. 

 

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Home fridges are generally quite cold (38-40F) or so.  Good retarding temps are usually between 46-50F so my outdoor thing works quite nice but then you always have to account for changes in weather and make minor adjustments.  Once we get colder the yeast really slows down to a near halt.  That's why many will bulk cold for up to 2 days in a home fridge. A few ways to adjust are:  Be crazy like me and turn your fridge temp down and chance killing yourself and others with food stored at dangerous temps above 40F.  Give your dough some time at room temp before retarding to get the fermentation a head start before it starts to cool down.  Give your dough time after the bulk at room temp to ferment.  But the latter is more like Pane al Ancienne which is basically a really long faux autolyse with minimal fermentation in the fridge and then its brought to temp to actually ferment before finishing.  Since you are a neighbor you could try using the outdoors or the coldest parts of your home if they are in decent range.  But remember to follow the dough and not a clock.  So if you know fermentation hasn't completed don't push forward or you'll be disappointed with the result.  Give the dough the time it needs one way or another.  

Josh

emkay's picture
emkay

Your SJSD is perfect, Josh. It's nice that you can use some CM T85 when you don't feel like milling some WW. Did you get the T85 at Keith Giusto's in Petaluma or can you buy it locally?

Mary

golgi70's picture
golgi70

I hitch on to another local bakery's order from time to time.  But I've considered the 4 hour trek.  

Thanks Mary

 

Josh

AbeNW11's picture
AbeNW11 (not verified)

Excuse my ignorance but I get the SD bit but what about SJ?

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Many Sourdoughs have titles with place of origin.  This is one of dmsnyder's contributions to the board so I've maintained his title for the loaf.  San Joaquin is a place in the bay area where I assume this originated.  For example many make Vermont Sour from J.H's book "Bread" and titled such because King Arthur Bakery is in Vermont.  

Josh

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

The SJSD (San Joaquin Sourdough) is named after the San Joaquin Valley, AKA The Central Valley of California. It lies between the California Coast Range and the Sierra Nevada. Technically, the San Joaquin Valley is that portion of the Central Valley drained by the San Joaquin River. To the North, the rest of the Central Valley is known as the Sacramento Valley. It is drained by the Sacramento River. Both of these rivers flow from the Sierra Nevada and join in a delta that drains into San Francisco Bay. But it is not "a place in the Bay Area."

Back when I was a kid, 15 million years ago, the Central Valley was an inland sea. Now, it is the most productive agricultural region on Earth. It produces most of the table grapes, almonds, figs, peaches, plums, nectarines, navel oranges, and many of the other farm products we consume in the USA and export. It produces more cheese than Wisconsin. 

And yet, we "get no respect." 

David

squarehead's picture
squarehead

thanks for the reply and tips. i like ur comment about being crazy and keeping ur fridge turned up. I guess u truly are an insane baker. 

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Great looking bake Josh.

Happy Holidays!

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I like the idea of the 500 dF bake. 

I made a batch of SJSD demi-baguettes yesterday. They will be spread with my wife's shrimp dip as one of our contributions to a Boxer Day potluck. I'll be baking a SFBI Miche for the party as well.

David