The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Some New Loaves

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Some New Loaves

A few new loaves have come to fruition.  First is the play on Baguette de Tradition.  Adding cocoa, brown sugar, and chocolate to make a nice Thanksgiving holiday bread.  So good while the crust is crunchy with just some butter or better yet nutella.  Others claim its pairing to goat cheese as a treat as well.  Use semi sweet to keep it kid friendly or go bittersweet for a more adult version.   

A good friend brought me a couple bags of Caputo's fine durum flour and I've wanted to make a nice stirato.  40% Durum Wheat and a slow rise like Pain a la Anciene made for a very tasty loaf.  

Finally a loaf I've been thinking of ever since my first run using whole sprouted rye berries in a loaf.  I love the pop and chew they add.  Plus they allow for a lighter loaf to be loaded with rye.  I decided to put a spin on Pumpernickel using the sprouted berries and molasses and then added a twist from Russian Rye incorporating some bread spice.  And we have Da Funkernikel.  I'm very happy with the results.  

The miche in the background is a play on the Pane Maggiore with increased PF and decreased hydration but I used a softer white flour so it felt pretty similar to its predecessor.  Haven't cut in yet but will soon.  

Cheers and Happy End of the Year, 

Josh

Cocoa de Tradition


For 4 Loaves @ 400g


595g         H20 (82%)
711g        Central MIlling AP (from Costco) (98%)
15 g         Fresh Milled Rye (2%)
58g          Cocoa Powder (8%) Good Quality here makes a difference
58g          Brown Sugar (8%)
1g            Diastatic Malt (.1%)
2g            Instant Yeast (.3%)
16 g         Sea Salt (2.2%)
580g        Chocolate (Semi Sweet Chips or Chopped bittersweet pending your liking)
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1) Mix all ingredients for a few minutes just til is a nice well formed dough. 5 minutes by hand
2) Bulk 3:00 - Fold @ 20, 40, 60
3) Divide on a floured surface to rough rectangles @ 400 g Place on floured couche tops down
4) Proof 50-60 minutes and prepare oven to 480F with steam setup
5) Flip off couche and bake with steam for 17 minutes and vented about 20 more.

 

Da Funkernikel (4 loaves @ 750g)

Sprouted Rye:

Soak two-thirds the needed amount in water for 8 hours.  Drain and place in a pan or dish where they will be no more than 1" high.  Cover with moist paper towel and plastic.  Stir as often as you can and keep slightly moist with a spray bottle.  Use when young sprouts begin.

Spice Mix:  Equal Parts fennel seed, caraway, and coriander seed toasted and ground in spice mill.  

Rye Sour:  Let Ferment 12-16 hours @ 73F

133 g         H20

167g          Fresh MIlled Rye

42 g           Refreshed Rye Seed

-----------------------------------------

Dough:  DDT 76F

-----------------------------------------

1000 g     H20

924g        Central Milling Bakers Craft

43g          Fresh Milled Rye

289g        Fresh Milled Hard Red Winter Wheat

29g          Blackstrap Molasses (2%)

4 g           Bread Spice (.3%)

36 g         Sea Salt (2.5%)

361g        Sprouted Rye Berries

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Total Flour:      1444 Grams (64% White, 16% Rye, 20% Whole Wheat) 13% PF and 25% Sprouted Rye 

Total H20:        1155 (80%)

Total Dough:    3030 g

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

1)  Mix Sour and ferment 12-16 hours @ 73F

2) Autolyse 30 minutes holding back 5% H20 for final mix.  DDT 76F

3)  Soften Rye Sour with Molasses and some of the H20 and add to auolyse.  Mix to combine.  5 minutes

4)  Add Salt with remaining H20 and continue to mix to medium development (7-10 minutes)  

5)  Add Sprouted Rye and mix gently until incoroporated

6)  Bulk 2:30 with folds @ 30,60,90 

7) Pre-shape in a soft round, rest 15 minutes and shape to floured bowl.  Retard 12 hours.

8)  Bake 500 with steam for 20 mintues, then vented for 30-40 more.  

 

And that Miche:

Comments

golgi70's picture
golgi70

The formulas came up so small.  It reformatted them to the screen.  

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I love the riffing off familiar formulas. The stirato is particular tempting at the moment, but the jury is out, pending a photo of the miche's crumb and your assessment of the results of your changes. The scoring is really attractive.

I have a bag of Central Milling's typo 00 clone that wants a challenge.

David

golgi70's picture
golgi70

And the first to my liking.  Very simple and quite tasty.  Very sweet and creamy.  Paired really good with nutella as a faux dessert.  

The 00 from central milling is Durum Wheat?  

Pic of miche is updated in post.   

 

Josh

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Ha! You got trapped in my loose associations like a dolphin in a tuna net!

The CM Typo 00 is not milled from Durum.

That miche is beautiful. You can have your nutella on Stirato. I want a bowl of winey daube de boeuf to dip my slice of miche in! But, if that's not available, I would not refuse Stirato with nutella. Just wanna make that clear.

David

golgi70's picture
golgi70

You could make both with ease.  The Stirato is mixed and bulked overnight while the miche is via the direct method with a stiff levain.  Use the same hot oven and get both bakes.  Perfect further because the miche needs to rest and the stirato quite the contrary.  

I used their Type 00 Reinforced flour and it made our sourdough with a 60 hour fermenting cycle much improved.  I also made some nice pizza doughs with it.  

You'll need to get some fancy durum for the stirato.  Mine came from your area as I have no access to the fine stuff only semolina unless I buy 50lb sacks of it.  

Josh

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

There is something for everyone and every occasion. Those formula charts are about to send me to the optometrist for an eye exam :-)  All of these breads have to taste great.  Well done and

Happy baking

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Just re-wrote to make it easier.  

 

Behnam's picture
Behnam

Damn I've been looking at your formulas to find "water" just to realize you wrote it as "H2O"... damn, I feel so stupid now :(

the breads look lovely though, especially cocoa de tradition!

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Sorry to be mis-leading.  Thanks for the kind words

 

Josh

varda's picture
varda

Really nice breads!   Even the chocolate (which I usually turn my nose up at.)  -Varda

golgi70's picture
golgi70

My first experience was at Balthazar in NYC.  A tiny bakery right next to the restaurant packed with amazing pastry and bread.  They did a Valhrona Chocolate Bread on Fridays.  My god it was so good.  This is not as good as that was.  But I assure you Chocolate bread is quite the treat.  In my world it is dessert.  Others do say it pairs nicely with goat cheese (I just really can't stand goat cheese).  

I dare you to try it and not like it.  Unless of course you have an aversion to chocolate altogether.  

Cheers

Josh

Toad.de.b's picture
Toad.de.b

...one need look no further than Josh's blog.  These latest are gems, even the chocolate (I'm with Varda on that - chocolate and bread, esp including scones -- grudgingly compatible).  Your control over the process is always inspiring Josh.   You make perfection look so bloody easy. 

Happy holiday baking

Tom

golgi70's picture
golgi70

-see the response to Varda

Not sure anything is perfect but thanks for the kind words.   

Cheers

Josh

squarehead's picture
squarehead

I want one of those Cocoa de Tradition. Or anything with chocolate for that matter. 

 I Might try to do them this weekend, though probably a half batch. 

 

proth5's picture
proth5

Recently I started work on a chocolate baguette. I don't use sugar in the dough and I was amazed at the savory/chocolate flavor. Chopped chocolate (both bittersweet and white) have made it wildly popular with my testers - although it was pretty good before the additions.

I've gone around on the type of flour and was wondering if you had inspiration on the AP vs stronger flours. I may have sacrificed crumb texture for being able to pull it into a real baguette shape and I'd appreciate your thoughts.

Nice breads!

Pat

golgi70's picture
golgi70

I am using AP because mainly because it was a tweak on another formula that called for such a flour and I've gotten good results.  I also increased hydration a touch to accommodate the cocoa but it's still a bit  firmer than the baguette dough itself.  I also don't form these at all and treat it like Pain Rustique.  

What percentage cocoa are you using ?  I'd think this dough without the sugar would be bitter.  But the type of chocolate added also really changes the sweetness level of the finished bread.  .  

Josh

proth5's picture
proth5

12% cocoa powder. It is  "high fat" cocoa powder from Pennzey's Spices (it's very nice and fairly dark). You would think it would be bitter (actually I thought it would be bitter and used sugar on the first version, but didn't like the texture), but it is mellow and savory. Even more of a surprise is that I use a liquid levain pre ferment - although my levain has a more lactic taste. Since I worked on the dough first before adding any chopped chocolate, it was all the taste from the cocoa powder.

In Version 5 - the current version - I used KA bread flour and for me a stratospheric hydration of 92% (my usual baguette hydration is 65-68%). I'm thinking of reverting back to the AP and maybe even staying at the high hydration now that I've got my mind around the concept.

The rye is an interesting touch, though. Of course, I'd want to use triticale :>)

Thanks!

Pat

golgi70's picture
golgi70

12% is pretty intense I would think.  I don't think the sugar hurt the texture very much but that is also because i've decided on minimal handling of the dough.  I bet the "high fat" has attributed to the enjoyable quality.   A previous chocolate bread i made used both fat and sugar.  it was more of a chocolate poor mans brioche than bread though.  Very cakey.  This one here has all the eating quality of a true bread.  I might try with no sugar sometime in a small batch just to see what it is you are working with.  

KA Bread Flour in my eyes is High Protein Flour. I think you will be very happy switching to a softer wheat.  I think this loaf is best with less chew and a more tender crispy bite (like a baguette).  

I'll have to try your version

Josh

proth5's picture
proth5

but very good. I made a bread pudding with the loaves of the earlier version and it was outstanding. I tend to like very dark chocolates. Yes, everyone is surprised with the 12%, though.

It is still more a bread than a cake. I have a third flour - "Turkey Brand" from Lehi Roller Mill that is a good "in between" flour and might incrementally step down to that. And then try the AP.

If I ever get to a version I like - I'll blog it. I can agonize over a formula for months. One of the luxuries of not having to get on with production...

BTW: I have found the Central Milling AP seems to perform better in my regular baguettes if I add 0.05% diastatic malt. I don't routinely add malt to my baguettes, but I've tried and retried with and without malt and the malted ones are always just "better" - have you experienced anything like that?

Thanks.

Pat

golgi70's picture
golgi70

I bet that bread pudding was amazing.  I too like a good bittersweet chocolate.  The version with it was very assertive and adult friendly while the chips added a more dessert like sweetness to the bread.  I hear ya on getting a formula down.  I've been fine tuning some formulas for over a year now.  

The CM AP I get is from Costco and I understand it's different than the flour in their wholesale to bakeries.  It's quite soft and doesn't tolerate fermentation like Baker's Craft.  I have been adding .1% Lo-Diastatic Malt from CM to all of my  mostly white doughs made with both of these flours.  I feel it aids in the fermentation and brings much better color and flavor to the finished loaves.  I still like buying non malted white flours since I do use a lot of fresh milled whole grain in many of my loaves.  Malted at our discretion.

Cheers

Josh

proth5's picture
proth5

My CM AP is also from Costco. From time to time the Costcos in my area decide to "discontinue" it and I have to switch flours (I go for "Hungarian High Altitude unbleached" when that happens) and I was noticing huge differences. Good to know I am not losing it.

Last year when I was working in Utah, the Costco there had a wonderful array of high quality, unbleached flours. But here in Denver it is nothing but the unreliably stocked CM AP or bleached flours. I can't convince them that "if you stock it - they will come..."

Thanks!

Pat

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Our Costco is awesome.  It really gears towards the region and so it's loaded with Organic/NonGMO at all times.  The CM AP came after they stopped carrying the Baker's Craft.  I wish they would carry both.  The other options are not really what I'm lookin for.  I wish they would carry even more as well but I'm sure its not their "bread and butter" so it would be a waste of shelf space to do such.  I was actually excited for the AP but it took some geting used too.  To keep my starter at the proper consistency I've had to drop from 66% hydration to 60% hydration.  I've also had to decrease inoculations as it was fermenting much faster and breaking down entirely.  With the added malt though it has made some lovely loaves.  

Do you ever get out to Babettes Artisan?  There breads/pastry look amazing.  Their write up in Breadlines created my "Grain de Oger" loaf AKA The Ogre.  

Cheers

Josh

proth5's picture
proth5

you might guess, I am so awash in my own baked goods that I seldom visit bakeries. I really should get out more.

Thanks for reminding me...

Thanks for the confirmation on the Costco CM AP - I have really had my ups and downs with this flour. I have to call Lehi Roller mills to get them to ship me more of their Turkey Brand (and their Artisan). Those flours are great.

 

Take Care.

Pat

ANNA GIORDANI's picture
ANNA GIORDANI

Complimenti, le tue panificazioni sono straordinarie. Formatura, alveolatura e cotture impeccabili.

Sono rimasta affascinata dalla tua esecuzione della "Cacao de Tradition", grazie per questa straordinaria condivisione.

Voglio proprio provare ad eseguirla.....

Grazie, a presto, Anna

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Thank You and enjoy the Cocoa de Tradition

Josh

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Well done on the creativity there Josh.  The chocolate loaf looks surprisingly yummy!  Those loaves would make X-mas a bit better on my table...thanks for this post.

John

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Thanks John.

I'm thinking of doing Chocolate Babka for the Christmas Bake along with Pumpernickel and the Fig n Fennel.  But I always change my mind day by day until I can no longer

Josh

Jane Dough's picture
Jane Dough

Your baking .looks beautiful as always. And fun!

I would like to ask you what makes you choose an AP over a bread flour and vice versa. On what do you base your decision.

thx in advance 

 

golgi70's picture
golgi70

The organic flour available to me is the CM Baker's Craft (11.5%) and CM AP (via Costco (10.5%)  I choose based on the loaf desired.  A baguette is light and airy and "tender" so I want a softer flour.  For loaves heavy with fat or soakers I prefer a slightly stronger flour.  Then I'll buy even stronger HP flours for heavy ryes, bagels, pretzels.  

If you make a baguette with stronger flour it'll be less open and tender.  And chewy. If I make a multigrain or fruit and nut loaf with the AP it ends up a bit heavy with less volume.  The slightly stronger flour helps lift the addins.  Same goes for a buttery dough.  

I'm fortunate to have these options and even blend them at times as this AP is a little softer than I'd like at times.  

Josh

Jane Dough's picture
Jane Dough

That is a very clear answer and something I really hadn't figured out yet in practice. I've read it a million times I'm sure. Now to put it to good use...

I'm not sure why but Costco here carries two flours only - Vienna strong and an all-purpose.  We're still figuring out the organic market here in Manitoba so I still buy mostly from a bakery or online.  Why we are so late to the party for organic is beyond me but it's a nuisance.  As for my lack of knowledge,  I depend pretty much solely on this site for answers. Never disappointed!

Peace, joy and happy baking. 

golgi70's picture
golgi70

All Flour is created not equally so you need to learn your flour and get the best out of it.  Since bread is such so simple in raw ingredients yet a live culture I feel that organic ingredients are of the utmost importance.  But I'm also blessed to have availability to it at excellent prices.  Maybe you have a nice bakery near by or a Natural Market that could get you organic flours for your baking.  

Cheers

Josh

isand66's picture
isand66

Wow!  All of these look awesome Josh.  When I finish the rye testing I have to ry these for sure.  Chocolate in anything is good in my book :)

ive used cocoa powder which is not sweet in bread bit not actual chocolate so I have to try this for my wife.

Best

Ian

 

cmatecun's picture
cmatecun

All your loaves look great, Josh. Nice variety! Have you published a formula for the miche? I would love to give that a try over the holidays. 

Chase

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Miche a Maggiore

Stiff Levain: DDT 80F - 3-4 hours

197g     Ripe Seed 66% Hydration)

108g    Water

49g      Fresh Milled Hard Red Winter Wheat

198g    White (Baker's Craft)

-----------------------------------------------------------

Final Dough DDT 78F

-----------------------------------------------------------

1106g      H20

223g        Fresh Milled Hard Red Winter Wheat

823g        White (Baker's Craft)

289g        Fresh Milled Rye

37g          Sea Salt

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

PROCESS:

Autolyse 1 hour holding back 5% H20 

Add Levain with most of remaining H20 and mix to incorporate completely

Add Salt with remaining H20 and mix until salt is incorporated and a soft dough is formed

Bulk 2:30 with folds @ 30,60, 90

Preshape softly and rest 15 minutes.  Shape to floured bowls

Proof 1-1:30 

Bake  500 with steam for 20 minutes

Continue Bake @ 470 for 40-50 minutes longer.  Deep Bake

Cool Completely. 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Overall:

H20:  76%

Wheat:  23%

White 60%

Rye 17%

Salt 2.16%

Pre Fermented Flour:  16.6%  Levain: 32.45%

Josh