The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Care of tinned steel

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Janet Yang's picture
Janet Yang

Care of tinned steel

How do you prevent tinned steel from rusting? My tinned bakeware always develops spots of rust, despite fragile handling and thorough drying. Climate doesn't seem to matter.

Recently I bought two Italian pandoro tins and a madeleine pan. As long as they were in frequent use, I didn't wash them between bakings, just wiped the crumbs out with a soft cloth. After all the holiday baking was over, I washed them by hand, dried them with a towel, then put them in a 220° oven for a few minutes. 

I just examined them and found traces of rust in the pandoro pans. It wiped away easily enough and the surface is not rough, so I guess the tin layer is mostly intact and the rust sort of "bled" through to the surface. But it's the beginning of the end, isn't it, once rust shows up? :(

What is the best way to protect tinned bakeware?

Janet

baybakin's picture
baybakin

a thin rub-down with a drop of oil.  I would suggest an oil that does not go rancid easily (or a drying oil like flax), mineral oil is another solution, but I would still wipe the tins down again before using.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

When I wash them,I rrinse with very hot water and even oven dry them.When they are thoroughly dry I rub them with vegetable oil or lard. Heat them for a while in the oven,if you wish to create a brownish coating. Looks a bit unappetizing but prevents rusting.

Janet Yang's picture
Janet Yang

Doesn't the oil oxidize and get sticky?

Janet Yang's picture
Janet Yang

I decided to coat the pans with cocoa butter because it takes at least two years to oxidize and go rancid.