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? Kneading in Braun Mixer

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andychrist's picture
andychrist

? Kneading in Braun Mixer

So the Braun 5-in-1 I scored Used on eBay came in the afternoon and I'm just putting it to the test whipping up a few pounds of SD rye bagel dough (enriched with TWG and apple purée this time.) Haven't burnt out the motor yet!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qkIvmy1kApU

Stupid question: Is there any point continuing to knead after the dough ball has pulled away from the sides of the bowl and "formed the swan"? I let the machine run on for a minute or two after that for the sake of thoroughness but really more just out of curiosity, as the dough had seemed well enough developed by then. With all the extras thrown into the mix, I don't expect my bagel dough ever to pass the window pane test — it's too heterogenous, not to mention stiff. So kinda hard to know how much, if any, time to give it post "swan"; so-called traditional bagel recipes are all over the place on this. Anybody here familiar with the way these mixers with the European dough hooks should be operated care to clue me in, so I don't over/under work my poor bagels with the Braun? Thanks!

 

chris319's picture
chris319

Is the dough being "worked", i.e. being stretched, or just riding the hook?

andychrist's picture
andychrist

I just edited in a video, so you can see how the Braun works the dough ball.  I had added the flour gradually so no, it never got hung up.

The Brauns have continuously variable speed control; Began incorporating the ingredients at the higher mixer setting (speed 1 out of 6) and once the dough started coming together brought it all the way down to the lowest possible, to avoid incident. But videos I see of the Bosch show it working at considerably higher speed. Dunno if that is better/necessary to develop the glutin all in one operation? Braun has gears built into the hook so it turns more slowly than any of the other attachments; relatively gentle on the dough  but still a world away from anything I can accomplish with my Presto hand crank.

Did you receive your Universal yet, Chris?

andychrist's picture
andychrist

for both my older 625W Braun K1000 and the newer 950W K3000 (same "3210" design). They are almost identical, each offering two seemingly contradictory sets of instructions under the heading Kneading yeast dough (bread/cake). Took me a while to realize that the first set, "Process up to 1.5 kg/3.3 lb flour," was just for making fruit cake. Next came the segment on bread dough, which for the K1000 reads as follows:

"Maximum quantity 2 kg/4.4 lb flour

(Processing of 1.5-2 kg/3.3-4.4 lb flour)

Speed 1-1.5  See below for processing times

First make a basic dough by placing all of the liquid and 1/2 of the flour with the yeast into the mixing /kneading bowl and then kneading at speed 3 for approx. 1 min.

Leave the basic dough for approx. 15 mins. 

Add the rest of the flour and knead at speed 1-1.5 for approx. 2 mins. Then remove dough from the bowl and allow to rise according to the recipe."

Only real difference* in the instructions for the later K-3000 is that it says to knead the second time for 5 mins, rather than the 2 mins with the K1000. Huh. Am guessing the reason for this is simply based on each models safety margins, rather than Braun changing their minds about optimal kneading time?

I had managed to blow the fuse on my first Braun K1000, by way overloading the mixing bowl and running the dough kneader at the machine's maximum setting, which was three times the highest speed advised with that attachment. But I was younger and stupider back then, and would never make a mistake like that again. Oh noo, no siree Bob, nope. Uh-uhh.

 

* The speeds on the K1000 go up to 6, in half-step increments. The K3000 goes up to 15, in full steps. So the settings in the K3000 manual appear about twice that of the K1000, where as the actual rpms are about the same. Slowest the dough kneader can turn is about 70 rpm.

chris319's picture
chris319

The Braun looks like it is working the dough pretty well in the video.

The Bosch Universal should arrive today (Thursday).

I want to see how the SS bowl handles small batches. I had begun working with firm sourdough starter before sending the Zo back.As a result of the Zo warming the dough during the Knead cycle (I'm still trying to figure that out), my stiff starter expanded greatly when I put it in the refrigerator and popped the lid off the plastic container and there was firm starter overflowing the container. There is a small bowl with a plastic dough hook available for the Bosch, so I have options.