The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Tartine Pizza

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PatrickS's picture
PatrickS

Tartine Pizza

We made pizza with the Tartine dough the other night. Came out amazing. Best pizza I've ever made. I've blogged about it a bit here: http://innerfabrications.wordpress.com/  but I didn't do a thorough process story. 

mike_bike_kite's picture
mike_bike_kite

I love the look of your pizza but it needs an explanation of how to make the dough.

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

He is just assuming you read/know Chad Robertson's Basic Country Loaf recipe, from the Tartine Bread book.

200 grams levain

900 grams flour

100 grams whole wheat flour

700 grams water

mix it let it rest for 25 minutes

Add 20 grams salt and 50 grams water, combine.

Stretch and fold 4x over two hours, 2 x over next two hours.

Divide, shape and rise for another 3-4 hours or in the fridge overnight.

I find the dough makes great pizza but it is a little too easy to stretch, meaning, every time you pick it up it gets a lot bigger, so it is difficult to make into the right size unless you are pressing it into the pan. At least, for me!

PatrickS's picture
PatrickS

Thanks David. Really the only thing I do differently from your instructions, is that I don't do a final proofing of the dough. After the bulk rise I give it a 30 minute bench rest. Then I stretch it and stick it in the oven. I'm not sure if I got that right, but I think that's what Chad advises in his book too. I wonder if not giving it the overnight proof is how it was a bit less slack when I was shaping. It was pretty soft, but it wasn't drippy or anything. 

The only other thing I do differently with all my Tartine style bread, is the leaven time. In the book it tells you to leave the leaven over night. With my starter, I have found that it passes the float test after about 5 hours. Overnight leaven works fine, it just gives a more sour dough. I like the wheat-forward flavor, so I do the leaven only until it is just able to passthe float test

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

I can't believe I missed that part of the instructions for making the pizza.  I expect that the overnight proofing did indeed make it super stretch, as the dough doesn't feel at all the same when it is ready for final shaping.

Now I can't wait to make pizza again.  Yesterday was a total disaster (well, it was delicious but messy) because it stretched bigger than my peel and bigger than my cast iron pie pan.  I think it will go much easier shaping the pizza after the bench rest as he suggests.

To give a feel for what it is like the following morning coming from the fridge...

It is cold, it is a bit damp and it is very heavy.  When you make some dents around where the outer crust will be, the fingerprints stick, more or less and as soon as you pick it up, the dough begins to drop and drop fast.  Moving it around with the thumbs and the dough is already 16 inches across before you can get a second rotation of the dough around the hands!  Then, forget about getting it on to a peel without making it even larger than it was. :)

 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Excellent looking pizza! nice work.

PatrickS's picture
PatrickS

Thanks! It was a lot of fun.

mike_bike_kite's picture
mike_bike_kite

David - thanks a million for the info. I'll quite look forward to having a shot a this one.

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

This guy was a moderator at the pizzamaking.com website. He used to make some cool videos.

Very short but you may pick up some cues as to how you might handle this wet dough, for pizza.




PatrickS's picture
PatrickS

Very cool! That one looked even a bit wetter than the one I made. It looked to be 100% white flour, which might make a difference. One thing I would mention, is that I used a wooden peel with cornmeal to get it onto my pizza stone. I think I would have needed a lot more cornmeal on a metal peel, as the wood seems to help it slide a little bit. 

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Yeah, that guy is a real pro, so to speak.

It looked so wet because he did use 100% Caputo 00 pizza flour. He actually reduced the hydration to 70%, I imagine because that flour is less absorptive than our typical bread flours(not to speak ww flour).

In all practicality, it probably was at least as wet as a typical Tartine country dough.

David Esq.'s picture
David Esq.

Pretty sure that what I am missing is the music! While there was a lot of drama surrounding the  making of my pizza, the lack of theatrical music was noticeably absent.

Thanks for the video! It was interesting to see how it stretched going from the wood to the metal peel.  Obviously, this pizza is a lot easier to make when you have a giant wood burning oven and don't have to worry about "fitting" the finished product on a small stone or piece of cast iron.

I think it makes a great pizza crust, both in terms of texture and taste.  It rises so nicely.  I really think I will have a much easier time shaping the dough after the bench rest. If worse comes to worse, I will press it into the cold pan instead of placing it on the pre-heated pan.

I may also pre-bake the crust before adding the toppings, as I find that if I cook it under the broiler on high, the toppings get done slightly ahead of where I want the crust to be, so if the crust is cooked a bit first so as to have a head start, I think I can get a crisper crust.

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Just takes practice. Really.

I do a very similar pizza dough in my home oven(peel, baking stone, etc). Although I didn't try it right off the bat. I worked my way up the hydration ladder, making wetter and wetter doughs.

Now, if you are using a lower protein AP flour, less than 11.5% or so, you very well may not get the development needed for it to hold it's shape, at Tartine's hydration level.

PatrickS's picture
PatrickS

Switching to KAF Bread Flour really made a difference in my Tartine bread. It ends up being much easier to work and has better structure once it's baked.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

wonder so many Fresh Lofians love Forkish's or Brad's take on Pizza Dough.  Nice holes but still a bit to thick for the very thin un-bendable crispy, crust pizza lovers we have around here.  Lucy has created pizza crust monsters.  Will give it a go and see what they think.  We always retard SD pizza dough for 12 ours for flavor and not having to do this will help out if the sour comes though. . 

Great pizza and happy baking! 

rarem's picture
rarem

 

I'm flat bread obsessed! And love making a good pizza.

I make bread about twice a week by hand but good never get my act together to make a levain. Are there any adaptions to the Tartine recipe that mean I can avoid making the levain. (I'm not adverse to making a biga i.e. bread, flour and yeast starter the night before, it's just all the feeding and discarding that I can't manage!)

PatrickS's picture
PatrickS

I love the Tartine recipes, but without leaven, I would select a solid recipe for a yeasted dough and go with that. Trying to bend the Tartine recipe could be troublesome.