The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Gluten free bread

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Masterofnothing's picture
Masterofnothing

Gluten free bread

Hi All, I am new to bread making, but am interested in making gluten free bread that doesn't feel like a brick!  There is a company in the UK that has managed to achieve this, however, it is pretty much impossible to now buy it.  

So I was wondering if I could use both yeast and baking powder to achieve this.

Does anyone have any experience of making "light" gluten free bread.

PastryPaul's picture
PastryPaul

I can't find how to follow this thread without commenting, so I'm commenting. If anyone knows what replaced the "subscribe to this thread" button,, please let me know. Sometimes, I'm just interested in a topic without having much to add to it.

Although I don't agree with the importance of the gluten-free fad (I know, for some people it's not a fad, but for the large majority it is), there exists a market currently for gluten-free bread. 

I have tried at least a dozen formulae but wouldn't allow any of those products onto my shelves. (Bricks indeed, or asking for ingredients that pose greater intolerances than gluten)

Cheers

 

Laura T.'s picture
Laura T.

Hi :) welcome to the gf world! I've tried to formulate a couple of new recipes over the past week or so and have fuit on a light baguette recipe I love. I don't use any dairy or eggs, as I find it weighs the loaf down a lot. I also don't use weird 'gums'. One thing I think is ESSENTIAL for gf bread baking is psyllium husk. It makes the dough sort of gelatinous, a little like gluten. I get mine online but you can get it from health food shops like Neal's Yard or from Asian grocers. I've posted my recipe here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/33338/best-ever-gluten-free-baguette-its-vegan-too I really think the key is to keep it simple (don't add eggs or other heavy things that shouldn't be in bread!) and buy several single-grain gluten free flours to mix in your own ratios, rather than the pre-mixed stuff. There is no gram for gram substitute for wheat flour, so mixing your own gives you far more reliable results. Hope that helps :)