The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

A word about pizza ...

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BROTKUNST's picture
BROTKUNST

A word about pizza ...

I thought I just throw this out here .... I liked to use the Pain a l'Ancienne dough for pizza. Quite perfect although maybe a bit resistant when you spin the dough. With guests over I prepared 'the usual' and P.Reinhard's Neo-Napoletana. What a difference ! The Neo-Napoletana is really worth a try. I used high gluten flour (KA Sir Lancelot) and you could spin the dough as you please, stretching the bubbles in the dough to create a tasty open crust. You find this formula in P. Reinhard's 'American Pie' (The books is much better than the luke warm title)

By the way, if someboday knows a good source for canned San Marzano tomatoes I would appreciate to hear about it.

 

BROTKUNST

mse1152's picture
mse1152

If there's one anywhere near you, that is...

Sue 

Wayne's picture
Wayne

But here is a source that carries a few different kinds of canned San Marazanos.

http://www.capriflavors.com/tomato.php

Wayne

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

tomato paste 50/50  that cuts down on the sugar, I leave the "cooking down" of tomatoes to others. I was a sceptic for many years 'til I tried it.  Stir in herbs & crushed garlic and spread ultra thin, a tablespoon or two is enough for a x-large pizza, and cover with ultra thin slices of fresh ripe tomatoes before adding rest of toppings.   Easy and world wide available.  Mini Oven

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I started using Italian San Marzano Tomatoes a few years back and today I am a total convert. They are so much better for everything that requires a nice tomato taste without the acidic flavor. Pizza sauce and any red Italian sauce is helped by starting with this quality product. Yes, it is slightly more expensive but the flavor is so much better you will appreciate the differance I'm sure. Here in Milwaukee most major groceries carry some brand of Italian style plum tomatoes and most come from the San Marzano region. There is a Brand with that name in a yellow and red can also that is even more pricey. But, summer is coming and I already have fresh tomato plants growing in the basement!

Eric

mountaindog's picture
mountaindog

Hey, glad to hear you like these tomatoes, as I have some San Marzano seedlings growing under my basement grow lights right now myself...Hopefully they will ripen before we get our first frost in the fall so I can try them on pizza among other things.

BROTKUNST's picture
BROTKUNST

I'll try the link ... Whole Foods is not too far away. I heard they would have Italian tomatoes but not the San Marzano type (on the plus side they knew what I was asking about).

Thank you also for posting the Ketchup tip :) We don't really ever have Ketchup around, so I cannot comment on the difference in taste. Sounds very different though ...

BROTKUNST

steverino's picture
steverino

I agree with you on Peter's Neo-Napoletano recipe as a winner.  I added 1 teaspoon of diastastic malt powder and it really gave the crust a light and wonderful texture.  For this same recipe I grilled the pizzas on a stone placed on my gas grill.  You'll need to babysit the pies to avoid burning the bottom.  They were wonderful!!

 

sourdough-guy's picture
sourdough-guy

I don't think you guys mean the same thing as me when you say 'grill'. Do you mean top or bottom heat or both? A grill for me is something you put your cheese and toast under.  

Sourdough-guy

ehanner's picture
ehanner

SDG, In the US people refer to a grill as the back yard bottom heat BBQ. The top burner in the oven is a broiler and that's what we use for "Grilled cheese". Actually at our place grilled cheese is done in a fry pan or griddle. To further complicate the issue, in a commercial restaurant they have a unit called a Salamander which is a more powerful broiler that is used to put a quick top crust on many dishes just before serving. :>)

On occasion I lay down some fire bricks in my back yard grill and cook pizza outside. I'll toss a few wood chips in a foil pack on the back burner to give the wood fired flavor.

Eric

bluezebra's picture
bluezebra

Hi SDG, as ehanner noted grills are different in the U.S. from what you probably know them to be. The grill we talk about here is bottom heat only. When I used to make my grilled pizzas, I would toss the dough directly onto the grill under direct heat. Once they set and get a few marks on them, you flip them with a spatula or tongs or in my case, both! After about 30 seconds or so, you can drag them or move them off of the fire and top them. Then replace on either a cooler part of the grill or over indirect heat. Playing with it till you come up with the right balance of direct fire to cook the crust and melt the toppings without totally scorching the bottom of the pie.

I always made individual pizzas because they were more manageable (about the size of pitas).