The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hobart N50 Restoration Project

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cholme's picture
cholme

Hobart N50 Restoration Project

Hello,

I just purchased a used Hobart N50.  It is in pretty good condition, but it need a few little parts.  I have refurbished a KitchenAid Mixer before and the parts were very easy to find online, not so much with the Hobart it seems.  I was wondering if anyone knows of a source for replacement parts for these mixers?  


Thanks,

Chris 

breadman_nz's picture
breadman_nz

Congrats on your purchase! I fully tore down and restored an N50 last year, and it's running great guns: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/24332/hobart-n50-restoration-experience

Parts for this mixer are pretty hard to come by outside of official Hobart dealers. You can get replacement bowls and attachments from places such as Globe Equipment (http://www.globeequipment.com/). The 5-quart (4.8L) bowl can be readily substituted with the generic KA bowls (brushed or polished: http://www.amazon.com/KitchenAid-K5ASBP-5-Quart-Professional-Stand/dp/B00004SGFU/ref=sr_1_1?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1338084356&sr=1-1). The bowl spring latch I THINK can is the same as the KA professional models, and be bought MUCH more cheaply than OEM Hobart (http://www.ebay.com/itm/KitchenAid-Mixer-Parts-REPLACEMENT-BOWL-SPRING-3182857-/110885099851?pt=Small_Kitchen_Appliances_US&hash=item19d144594b#ht_1704wt_1141) - I bought my OEM one for $160NZD from our local Hobart supplier - ouch!

Any further Q's just ask.... and message me if you want a PDF of the service manual, which has a few good tips and tricks for pulling apart and getting back together again.

 

Keith Tonne's picture
Keith Tonne

I have a Hobart n-50 which my parents bought when they retired from their bakery.  It had been used in a lab at Purdue University for 20 years mixing asphalt samples! I have has it for over 20 years with no problems, but it recently developed a funny "tick."  I took it to a dealer who disassembled it and said it was hopeless and gave it back to my as  2 boxes full of parts.  I have rebuilt and repaired a Hobart 20 qt which was also declared "unfixable," but THAT one I could disassemble myself (taking careful notes about reassembly.)  Since this one is already in pieces, the service manual would be invaluable!

Thanks for any help you can give me!

Keith

SandSquid's picture
SandSquid

I found one on a server >>HERE<< while slinking around online.

SCChris's picture
SCChris

I recently acquired a 1960 N50 in relatively good condition, it runs quiet at all speeds, no undue gear or bearing noise, but I'd be more comfortable giving it a complete service before really working it.  And then the question that keeps bouncing around my head is, "since I need to pull it apart for the major service, wouldn't it be nice to re-finish it?".

I haven't seen any mention of the cost of the refinishing, powder coating I expect, or like LeoLady's chrome plated model G.. 

Well, first comes the strip down and finishing, if desired, will come later anyway..

 

Thanks

 

Chris

 

 

 

Bob Marley's picture
Bob Marley

Not wanting to start a war, but what's your reason(s) for getting an N50 instead of Ankarsrum and I know that working and serviceable N50s can be gotten at ebay for less than $500 occasionally.

 

Best

mixinator's picture
mixinator

Chris: the author of the post above yours is offering an N50 service manual pdf. Why not send him a private message?

SCChris's picture
SCChris

The N-50 is less about bread and more about other mixing.  There is no question that the Ankarsrum will handle dough better past a KG or so and hand mixing up to 10Kg is very doable without much effort beyond the initial mixup..  So why the N-50, I like it better than the 1980s K5ss that It'll be replacing..

 

Chris

barryvabeach's picture
barryvabeach

Chris, it all depends how much money you want to put into it, but if you want to save some money, many people have done some nice restoration of old machines using spray cans of paint -  especially if you are tearing it down anyway - surface preparation and getting the right angle to spray are a big factor in how good it looks when it is done.

SandSquid's picture
SandSquid

I have both the Ankasrum and the N-50, and they are both fantastic machines, for what they do.
The Ank (technically a Elecxtrolux Assistent) produces a superior bread product, hands down.
The N-50 is superior at all the other whipping and beating tasks.

SandSquid's picture
SandSquid

Try these folks:

http://generalparts.com/Locations.htm

A good friend of mine works (as a dispatcher) at one of their locations, and has access to ordering Hobart, no problem.