The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hobart c100 Owners Question

tjated's picture
tjated

Hobart c100 Owners Question

Hello all. I have a Hobart c100 and am trying know more about it. First, some background. I bought it from ebay two years ago. It was in a bit rough shape, but came with the latest service records where it was disassembled and regreased. Since it was already repainted in a two-tone color, I completed stripped it down to metal, cleaned, and repainted it. I also replaced the original plug...wow I can't believe they made it with that originally.

Here it is:

I am trying to correctly age this mixer. The best guess I have is 1960's due to the rounded feet. It didn't come with a serial number :( so that's tough, but I did get an extremely good deal and it came with a splash guard, bowl, and authentic c100 dough hook.

Also, I am concerned with some movement when mixing, I think it may be from some looseness with the dough arm connecting to the drive, creating an unbalanced situation, but not sure.

Hoping other c100 owners can help with these questions, and maybe I can be helpful, too, with other questions about the mixer.

Thanks for taking a look!

richkaimd's picture
richkaimd

onesharpstore.com

phxdog's picture
phxdog

tjated,

Nice job with the paint! I have a c100 that I think was built in the mid 1950's. Runs like a tank, however I too, have noticed it's a bit wobbly where the dough hook meets the shaft. Perhaps that wobble is designed into the units?

My Hobart has a VERY heavy 3/8" by about 14" round base plate (rather than 'feet' like yours) and seldom walks unless I'm working with pretty stiff doughs over 2000 grams. I also find if I'm working on a solid surface (built-in counter vs. island) I get a lot less movement of the mixer.

I've got a huge slicer/shredder attachment that looks like a pelican and a nice wire wisk, but I wish I had your splash guard!

Phxdog (Scott)

PhilipG's picture
PhilipG

wow, I too have a C100 but I want your splash guard. I would also check out the Hobart site and send them an email under the Contract Us button. Tye might be able to ball park it based on description. Mine was made in 1954. Same year my wife was born, except that she in only 39. Hmmmm good luck. I have the shaft wobble too. Was wondering if it is-because the dough hook is a bit worn? may just be built that way. Enjoy!

richkaimd's picture
richkaimd

My problems with an old Hobart were unsolvable until I called the sales rep at onesharpstore.com   The woman who answered was knowledgeable, helpful, in good humor and didn't try to sell me anything.  They seem to have a lot of parts from old machines, the splash guard maybe?

ken mitchell's picture
ken mitchell

I have had a C100 for several years. I mix 10 lb. batches of bread in it with King Arthur all purpose flour with no problem. This mixer will not handle large batches using high gluten flour. As far as walking goes, my mixer has feet like yours and will walk when in 2nd speed. I have put my mixer on a metal table that has been bolted to the wall in my garage. On top of the table I have bolted a 1 inch piece of ply wood the size of the table top. I have cut out slots that match the feet, the feet fit into these slots and stabalize the mixer with no problems.

Good luck

 

Ken

tjated's picture
tjated

Thanks a bunch everyone! I appreciate the information and insight into this historic mixer. It seems that the wobble in the dough arm must be normal. Also, Ken, you mentioned that by supporting and stablilizing the feet into  a stronger base it will take care of the walking or vibrating. I do have it on an island. 1st gear is usually all I do because 2nd gear with a serious batch of dough is, well, scary.

The splash  guard is nice... on many occasions it's saved loose ingredients from getting flung around the kitchen.

I do love this mixer. Does any one know about how often to have it regreased? I have a brick oven and make pizza and bread about 12-15 times a year. So I believe for these mixers, that's not a lot of run time. When was the last time anyone had theirs regreased? Did you do it yourself?

Thanks again for the info.

richkaimd's picture
richkaimd

I promise you that I don't work for these people:  find onesharpstore.com on the internet and call them.  If they don't have all your answers, I'll be surprised.

I promise never to write this again for fear you'll think I'm their agent.  I'm really not.  I'm just passing on my happy experience with them.

 

 

ken mitchell's picture
ken mitchell

Hi

Even though you have your mixer on an island, it will walk around on the top of the island unless stabilized some how. As far as mixing in first gear, that is ok if you are doing stretch and fold to develope the gluten. I incorporate the ingreadients for 2-3 minutes in 1st gear then develope the dough in 2nd gear for 4-5 minutes for an improved mix. I take of the guard after incororporation and do not use it in 2nd gear. All the guard does is prevent flour and liquid from being thrown out of the bowl prior to total incorporation.

 

Ken

tjated's picture
tjated

I know the mixer itself weighs in around 100 pounds, but I guess to have more confidence in using the 2nd speed I'll have to build a stand that would be more stable. I have no idea what that would look like, but I guess it also would have to be fairly heavy, too.

 

I notice the dough tends to slap around more(in 2nd gear), is that what you see too?

phxdog's picture
phxdog

Yep,

I get that 'slap' of the dough in 2nd (& absolutely in 3rd) gear. To me it sounds like doing the French Fold technique, slamming down on the counter,  just a lot less work for me. When I need lots of gluten development, that old mixer is hard to beat.

tjated's picture
tjated

I did email the people mentioned in the previous post and they very quickly replied. Without a serial number it s hard to know the exact age, but they did say it was probably around 50 years or so. Does that sound about right? Anyway, I am getting ready for to fire the brick oven and mix up the biga for some bread this weekend. Thanks for the inforegarding the c100. :)

ken mitchell's picture
ken mitchell

As far as using 2nd and 3rd gears for bread, for most bread using white flour, 4-4.5 minutes is sufficient to develope the dough in 2nd gear. This will give you what is referred to as an improved mix. If a lot of stretch and folding will be used a lesser mix time would be ok.In my opinion 3rd gear should not be used for bread. The slapping is normal and is the main cause of walking. When the hydration % goes up, the slapping subsides quite a bit.

Ken

 

tjated's picture
tjated

Went to turn on my beloved C100 this weekend for a big batch of pizza dough and it just buzzed and hummed. I turned it off and tried again with no change. Nothing has changed, so I am thinking it's the capacitor. Does anyone know the type or rating of capacitor for the C100?

tjated's picture
tjated

For the Hobart C100 owners out there who may need a capacitor in the future, Hobart still makes it. The part number is 00-070487-00007  The dashes are important when looking the part number up online. It's an $11 part. shipping is $16.

The person I talked with was amazed I had this unit. He was telling me it's a generation removed, and easily 60 years old, if not 70.

If your unit buzzes and doesn't turn, it MAY be the capacitor. I found the terminal the wire plugs into on top of the capacitor detached from the element going into the capacitor itself on the inside. Simply reattaching it made it purr again. Gosh, I am so happy.

mx6er2587's picture
mx6er2587

Glad you got it running again! In case anyone is curious in the future:

The capacitor in the C100 is a fairly standard electrolytic motor start capacitor that is disengaged by a centrifugal switch once the motor starts spinning. I'm not sure if the capacitor in my C100 is anywhere near original but it's very old and runs well so I'll provide the specs here.

My C100 is running an 86 microfarad (MFD or uF) 110 volt capacitor. Modern start capacitors will likely be labeled with a microfarad range (such as 72-88). You want this range to overlap the old part. Its not an exact science, but you want this number to be as close as possible. On the voltage side you are free to use any capacitor with at least the same voltage rating as the one you are replacing. So for example feel free to use 125,250,330v capacitors. Keep in mind a higher voltage rating is better, but may come at the expense of a larger physical size. Below is a picture of my cap.

 

 

mx6er2587's picture
mx6er2587

Another nice piece of information on start capacitors is that they are non polarized. This means there is no direction or orientation for the terminals and you can reverse the wires connections without issue.

chester52101's picture
chester52101

Mixer did not come with dough hook. Ordered one online. Goes on nice, but the drive just turns when I try to lift and turn to twist off.... Any ideas or similar problems?