The Fresh Loaf

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Malzbrot - Tyrolean Malt Rye Rolls with Sesame and Pumpkin Seeds

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hanseata's picture
hanseata

Malzbrot - Tyrolean Malt Rye Rolls with Sesame and Pumpkin Seeds

My first "Equal Opportunity Bread" (see my last post) had to be a batch of rolls. I like having a supply of rolls in my freezer, when we come home from a trip, and want a bread that thaws faster than a large loaf. So I grabbed one of my most favorite baking books - hey, who said I couldn't include my favorites in my fair baking? - "Brot aus Südtirol". Richard Ploner's breads are all small, mini breads, or rolls. The (professional baker's) reasoning: "They should all have the same size in a mixed bread basket".

This baking book has everything going for it, interesting recipes and appetizing photos. Unfortunately, it has not been translated into English, yet. Because of this sad omission I am happy to be able to translate at least some of its wonderful recipes for English speaking bakers.

The one thing I always change - apart for an adaptation of the ingredients to what is available in the US - are the very short fermentation times. Ploner doesn't retard his doughs, but I do, and I am sure that even these nice breads benefit from it.

The original recipe lists sugar caramel color (15 g) - I didn't have it and didn't see a real need for it, either. Richard Ploner lets you choose between toasted soy flakes and pumpkin seeds - for me a no-brainer, since I love toasted pumpkin seeds, and buy them in bulk. The sesame seeds I toasted, too, to enhance their "nuttiness".

 

MALZBROT - TYROLEAN MALT RYE ROLLS WITH SESAME AND PUMPKIN SEEDS

6 g instant yeast
280 g water, lukewarm
300 g all-purpose flour
100 g medium rye flour
100 g whole wheat flour
5 g malted barley flour (non diastatic)
5 g sugar (1 tsp.)
6 g sesame seeds, toasted (2 tsp.)
50 g pumpkin seeds, toasted, chopped
3 g whole caraway seeds (1 tsp.)
10 g salt


DAY 1:

1. Dissolve instant yeast in warm water. Mix with other dough ingredients to form a rough ball, 1 - 2 minutes on low speed (or with a wooden spoon). Let dough rest for 5 minutes.


2. Knead on medium-low speed (or by hand) for 2 minutes, adjusting with water, if needed (dough should be a bit sticky). Continue kneading for 4 more minutes, the last 20 seconds at medium-high speed (dough should still be more sticky than tacky).


3. Transfer dough to lightly floured work bench, and, with wet or oiled hands, stretch into a rough square, fold like a business letter, and then fold again like a business letter from the short sides. Tuck sides under dough to shape a ball, and place in oiled bowl, seam side down. Cover, and let rest for 10 minutes.


4. Repeat S & F for 3 more times at 10 minute intervals (total time 40 minutes). After the last fold, place into oiled container, cover, and refrigerate overnight.


DAY 2:

5. Remove dough from refrigerator 2 hours before using, it should have doubled in size (or shape cold, with then longer rising time).


6. Preheat oven to 428ºF/220ºC, including steam pan. Divide dough into 10 equal pieces. Pre-shape into rounds. Let relax for 5 minutes.


7. With both hands, roll rounds into 10-cm/4" long strands, with tapered ends. Place, seam side down, on parchment lined baking sheet. Score lengthwise. Mist with oil spray, cover, and let rise for 45 - 60 minutes, or until they have grown ca. 1 1/2 times their original size.


8. Bake for 12 minutes, steaming with 1 cup of boiling water. Rotate rolls, remove steam pan, and continue baking for another 13 minutes, until they are golden brown. Leave in switched-off oven with door slightly ajar for 5 more minutes, then let cool on a wire rack.

Malzbrot - These rolls went straight into Karin's Bread Hall of Fame - they are soooo good!

 

Comments

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Karin,

Thanks for the quick write up.  This is now printed and 'in waiting'.

Thanks too for translating into English.  I so appreciate that!

And I appreciate the retarding addition :-)

Take Care,

Janet

Franko's picture
Franko

These look and sound very tasty Karin, thanks for sharing the recipe. A procedure check if I may, is "Mist with oil spray, cover, and let rise" correct? It's a technique I don't think I've seen before, guessing it's meant to keep the crust soft? All the best with your commendable project for 2012, this is a great start!

Franko

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Janet, alas, we two are retards... :)

Karin

 

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

:*)

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Franko, this is just a measure to prevent the dough from sticking to the plastic wrap that I use to cover it while it rises. It also keeps it from forming a skin. If I let a bread rise in a banneton, I flour it heavily to prevent it from drying out, but if I let a bread rise on the baking sheet I always mist it with baking spray.

Karin

lumos's picture
lumos

Thank you very much for sharing this, Karin.  They look lovely, and  they must've tasted good with that combination of flour, too.

Interesting the original recipe called for sugar caramel colour, because my first ever bread book I bought (more than 30 yrs ago, when I was still in Japan) was written by  Japanese baker who was trained in Germany and many of her recipes included caramel colour, too.  It had a recipe for how to make caramel colour because those days you couldn't buy it in a shop.  Is it easily available in Germany?  Just wondering if using dark brown sugar (instead of ordinary sugar in the recipe) might be an easy alternative to caramel colour. (Can't get it in UK and can't be bothered to make one....:p)

 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

No, Lumos, caramel color (Zuckercouleur) is not everywhere available in Germany. I looked it up in Wikipedia, it is produced industrially "in a special, carefully controlled heat treatment, in the presence of acids, alkalis or salts". It is more oxidized than caramel candy and is used mainly for food coloring, with an odor of burnt sugar and a slightly bitter taste.

I fould a recipe for home made sugar caramel color: melt 50 g brown sugar in hot skillet over high heat, and stir with spatula until desired color is reached. Reduce heat to medium, add 100 g water, and stir with spatula until sugar has dissolved again.

The question is - is it really worth it? The rolls have an attractive color without the caramel sugar color, and, obviously, it doesn't influence the taste.

But using brown sugar as substitute for the white sugar is definitely an option.

Happy baking,

Karin

 

lumos's picture
lumos

Thanks for the info and clarifycation,  Karin. The way you made caramel colour is very similar to the recipe in the book I mentioned above.

Have you tried comparing two breads, one with caramel colour and one without?  Haven't myself, so I may be wrong, but not too sure if caramel colour is only for colour.   It's 'caramelazed'  sugar, so surely it does add some flavour and aroma to the bread, even though the effect might be not too big? 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

No, I didn't even try - according to Wikipedia the industrial caramel color adds only color, not flavor. It comes in different lighter to darker brown varieties, depending on what kind of bread it's being used in.

I just looked at the list of ingredients, googled the caramel color, and decided that it's not really needed.

Karin

lumos's picture
lumos

Oh, I see.....so the industrial one is perhaps just extract of colour but not taste, maybe?

I have made 'caramel colour' from the book above a long time ago (just once) but I remember it did have distinctive aroma and sweetness of burned sugar, so maybe it's quite different from the industrial one, then... It was quite nice on vanilla ice cream, too. :)

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Karin,

I've seen your list, am impressed with your idea and am looking forward to all the other posts.

I have a book which has lurked on my shelves since the early 1990s I believe, called "The Bread Book" by Linda Collister and Anthony Blake.  Most of of the book having saunters through some lovely offerings mostly made in the home.   The second last chapter on Sourdough has Lionel Poilane on the first page, with Jeffrey Hamelman of Hamelman's Bakery just over the page.   The last chapter has Michel Roux leading with a feature all about his croissants!

A neglected book in my collection?   Maybe!

Best wishes

Andy

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Yes, it's really strange that one always chooses the same books - without any really plausible reason other than that they look nicer, or are more familar. I, also, tend to be put off by endless long introductions, and chapters that recapitulate what I know already. No good reason - I could just skip those pages.

I'm adding something from your blog to my list, too, Andy - not easy to choose, since there are so many great breads: I'll go for the "White Levain with Seeds"

Karin

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

rolls hanseata and thanks for the translation. It think I might be tempted to sub some molasses or malted barely syrup for the sugar - just for extra (and not needed) color and taste plus it might cover up the addition of hemp seeds :-) Will also use YW instead of instant yeast too.  I usually don't stock commercial yeasts.

Is the crumb as soft as it looks?

Very nice bake.

hanseata's picture
hanseata

That would certainly add a nice touch. I can't get any fresh yeast here around, so I have to use instant yeast. I don't really mind, because it's so practical. You will need ca. 18 g.

The crumb is fairly soft, and the taste is wonderful (with or without hemp seeds :)

Karin