The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Cooling pitas?

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kolobezka's picture
kolobezka

Cooling pitas?

  I tried pitas for the first time following the great TFL tutorial and they turned out wonderful - they were puffed up and crispy (just as on the photo in the tutorial).

But what should they look like before filling /  eating? Mine stays puffed up  and crispy several hours whereas on most photos they are flattened and probably soft. How do you manage that they flatten?

Thanks 

zdenka

(I posted the same question directly under the tutorial, but it must have been overlooked :( )

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

could it be they baked too long?  Dried them out maybe?    The ones I baked just fell on their own when cooling or being stacked up or the second they were cut warm sliced on the rims.  They never live long enough to tell a story.   Hours huh?   got a picture?

kolobezka's picture
kolobezka

that´s true that I baked them longer than recommended, about 8 minutes. But they were too white before. I´ll post the picture as soon as my husband returns.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

But they can be toasted or dragged across a dry hot grill or frying pan for color.  I've even seen little racks that hold bread up over gas flames.  I think my bil lays them on the bottom of the oven to brown (hidden coils.)  As long as the stuffing is spicy and flavorful, I don't think they have to have much browning.  Might even make them fall apart in your hands while you eat.  I tend to stuff them with lots of cheese and meat and melt everything in the micro.  Then re-open to continue stuffing with onions and yogurt and herbs and whatever is handy, olives and capers, squash pickles and pickled peppers.  Even shredded lettuce and cucumber sometimes.  

Wrap paper around the outside and you won't have to look at the paleness.  

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

Zdenka,

If you look closely at the pictures in the tutorial, you will see that the pitas are essentially white with little browning.  I would suggest that if you want a more browned pita that you bake them hotter not longer.

Jeff

RedL's picture
RedL

I stack and wrap my pitas in a towel as they come out of the oven.  That seems to keep the soft.

kolobezka's picture
kolobezka

thank you all for you suggestions. I´m always afraid it would not be baked enough. That´s also why I always bake rather longer than shorter time (even breads)

I´ll post the photos tomorrow and I´ll give it another try, maybe on Sunday :)

zdenka

NahikuRay's picture
NahikuRay

My personal experiences...

My first experience with pita bread was from Bernard Clayton's "The Big Book of Bread".  I followed his recipe, but his timing seemed off.  He said to flatten the dough and "bake it at 500 degrees, for 8 minutes, or, just until puffed.  Reduce the temperature by 50 degrees if you are using a convection oven" (which I have). 

I found that, at 450 degrees, even with a convection oven, you got a 45% success rate.

At 500 degrees, however....100%, but, "just until puffed" required only 5 minutes.  Given that they are so thin, 5 minutes seemed to work very well.