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hunting for the best ensaimada con cabello de angel; first result!

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freerk's picture
freerk

hunting for the best ensaimada con cabello de angel; first result!

 

Looking around for interesting bakeries and local bread specialties when holidaying has become second nature to me by now.

 

My better half has learned to live with it; although heading for a museum of modern so and so, we regularly end up neatly tucked away in the corner of the local bakery shop instead.

 

Our recent trip to Ibiza was no different. I came back with one of the local specialties; ensaimadas.

 

Or to be even more specific: ensaimadas con cabello de angel, a sort of pumpkin jam. It translates into 'angel hair' (not the pasta variety) due to the stringy texture of the specific pumpkin used.

 

This is what it looks like

Traditionally it is made using lard, but olive oil seems to be an acceptable replacement for those who don't do pig.

It is a wonderfully fluffy and (despite the lard) light pastry, coiled into a big powdersugared loaf, about the size of a big dinner plate. The smaller versions usually don't have any filling (ensaimada tradicional).

Of all the possible  fillings,  the 'cabello de angel' seems to be the only one that is rolled into the ensaimada.

 

Any TFL-ers out there with roots in the Balearic who could share the perfect recipe or interesting  "new world" variations? I would love to make it here myself, so if you can help, please do! :-)

 

Looking forward to this,

 

Freerk

 

Update!!

 

Here is the first result of my home made ensaimada trial bake :-)

 

This one is without filling, so no caballo de angel, but it most certainly looks like an ensaimada, if I say so myself

   

The rise was slow (6 hours), and I think I could have waited longer. I suspect my "madre" has gone slow on me.  The oven spring was remarkable. I haven't tasted it yet, it's cooling down now. It all looks fairly promising so far... very curious what the inside looks like.... puffy and light...?  More to  come :-)

 

Freerk

 

 

 

 

clazar123's picture
clazar123

You always have such interesting breads/pastries. That is why I love this site-it brings together such a variety of people from all over the world in a common passion. Your pictures are also beautiful!

http://globalgluttononline.blogspot.com/2007/06/start-your-day-mallorcan-way-ensaimadas.html

and

http://bakemyday.blogspot.com/2010/02/bread-baking-babes-bake-ensaimadas.html

I googled these blogs for the pastry (haven't found the filling)-never heard of ensaimadas but they sound delicious!

Have delicious fun! 

 

Edit:Found something-translated from Spanish so it might be interesting

http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=es&u=http://www.cocina.org/2829/CABELLO-DE-NGEL.html&ei=3rDwTd39Lsnn0QGBibiRBA&sa=X&oi=translate&ct=result&resnum=2&sqi=2&ved=0CCoQ7gEwAQ&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dcabello%2Bde%2Bangel%2Breceta%26hl%3Den%26biw%3D960%26bih%3D593%26prmd%3Divnse

freerk's picture
freerk

Great stuff Clazar123!

I am going to try and make them without a filling first. The traditional pumpkin like fruit used to make the "angel hair" version is not easy to come by over here and the shaping is going to be a challenge anyway.

A friend of my cousin grows pumpkins, and she has been contacted to give me more info on growing season and where to get that "cidra" pumpkin (figleaf squash).

I have been browsing around as well and on YouTube there are some wonderfully insightful videos on both making the ensaimadas and the pumpkin jam. There is one version that takes 5 days to make! Not sure if I'm going to use that one ;-)

More to follow!

Freerk

flournwater's picture
flournwater

I've seen it spelled "ensaymada" also and, if your looking for a recipe, you can find it quite easily with that spelling using a Google search.  I don't believe they are uniquely Mediterranean because a number of cultures number outside of that region prepare them, or something quite similar, as both beautiful large coils or smaller individual single servings.

You must surely be an adventurous bread/pastry maker; these are not a novice project.  The frustration of getting the dough stretched thin enough for the crust to be just right would overwhelm a lot of new bakers.  I've never tried to make one myself but it's on my list of things to try for this summer.  Best of luck to you.....

 

 

freerk's picture
freerk

The ensaima originates in the Balearic and has found it's way into the entire Latin world and parts of the world that were at some stage conquered by the Spanish, like for instance the Phillipines.

I have googled some recipes already but am hoping for some input from my fellow TFL-ers, maybe even from some one with roots in the culture the pastry comes from. I like it like that :-)

Shaping this thing is going to be a major challenge indeed, but hey, I like a good challenge! there are some very interesting YouTube videos that make it look easy, but I recognize a pro baker if I see one ;-)

I'll post the results on here (if there is anything worthwhile to post, lol)

Happy baking!

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Freerk,

That looks deliciously tasty. I can see how that would merit a detour from an exhibition of Miró, or whatever.

I don't know if you have come across the Spanish bread board Madrid Tiene Miga. As some of the Spanish and Spanish-speaking bakers on TFL can attest, it has some great bread recipes and is also written in a witty style. There is a recipe for Mallorcan ensaimada on the link below. Obviously not caballo de angel but you also ask for guidance on process and input from bakers with a cultural knowledge of this bread.  

On another note, I can understand that some bakers don't do lard but I would suggest from my experience of British style shortcrust pastry that this is a light pastry because of rather than despite the lard. The formula below also uses manteca de cerdo. It's interesting that it also seems to use a pâte fermentée or sourdough, as well as fresh yeast.

http://madridtienemiga.wordpress.com/2010/03/20/madrid-california-mallorca/

Hope this goes well. I would be grateful for insight into how this beautiful bread bakes up!

Kind regards, Daisy_A



freerk's picture
freerk

Hey Daisy!

Very nice! That Madrid Tiene Miga goes straight into my bookmarks bible :-) The caballo de angel is put on hold until I find the appropriate fig leaf squash, but I am sure going to give the ensaimada a try. I got some pata negra lard from a Spanish woman I know. Probably won't make a difference in taste, but I was glad I got my hands on it anyway, also for other cooking purposes.

 

I'll keep you posted on any progress!

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Freerk,

I'm glad Madrid Tiene Miga appealed! They do have some interesting recipes on their site and also the occasional report of a visit to a bakery producing special Spanish breads. Obviously they are interested in international recipes also. Members of the site were active in promoting the translation of Dan Lepard's Handmade Loaf into Spanish. I think it was issued as Hecho a mano, which I love as a title.

Pata negra lard! That sounds the business. Do you think it might taste of acorns? Look forward to the taste report. Haven't seen that here but we can get a lovely sweet, nutty lard from our butcher. Not so sure how it would go in pastries but it is great in braised meat dishes. 

You're brave to tackle advanced lamination! I've done croissants but it still makes me nervous. I think you did a great job on the first ensaimada. This has got me interested in this pastry.

I also found MNJ's telling of the back story really interesting. I have to say I'm game for breads and pastries that take a long time. However they have to repay us by being delicious. This is delicious, no?

Turns out it may be possible to buy the curcubit seeds in the UK. I've grown veg. for several years now but had stuff all success with curcubits in the garden. Still we have a small lean to conservatory. Time for another try maybe?

http://www.originaltouch.co.uk/acatalog/Cabello_de_Angel.html

Wishing you the best for your further baking!

Best wishes, Daisy_A

 

freerk's picture
freerk

Sweet! I know this brand of seeds and I have seen them around here as well. Let's see if I can get myself some. I'm living in the dead center of Amsterdam without a garden unfortunately, but my brother has a huge veggie garden, maybe he will grow some for me (next year, I suppose, seems to be too late to start now).

I just put up some pics of the second batch of ensaimadas, with a filling of pimpkin jam. check em!

The taste report: the first batch were a bit chewy, but tasted close to what I remember eating on Ibiza. The second batch is softer, less crunchy (the added olive oil to the dough?) more bready. The second batch will be the winner with my friends and family, but I like the first better :-)

I still have to try the third ensaimada (with both filling and lard and  added olive oil) but for the moment my tummy is more than satisfied on pumpkin jam, dough and powder sugar :-D

 

X Freerk

kim's picture
kim

Hi Freerk,

For the jam/filling, I think I know what kind of squash you are looking for; they are called Cucurbita Ficifolia aka Shark Fin Melon (魚翅瓜 in Chinese). In Asia, we use the melon to cook soup sometimes I use them in my pineapple tart filling when I don’t have enough pineapple. In Costa Rica, my friends use them to fill her empanadas. So I think you are looking at the same thing I am talking about. Here are the links that I think it will be helpful:

Cucurbita Ficifolia aka Shark Fin Melon:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cucurbita_ficifolia

Cucurbita Ficifolia filling/ Ensaimada de cabello de Angel filling:

http://azulpurpuranuria.blogspot.com/2008/09/cabello-de-ngel-dos-formas-de.html

Ensaimada de cabello de Angel making:

http://drapet.blogspot.com/2011/02/ensaimadas-paso-paso-tmx.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQnJQrxlQe4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RPZdwWc2zwg&feature=related

My Spanish is rusty so I better stay away from translation. I hope you don’t mind.

Kimmy

freerk's picture
freerk

Hey Kimmy,

 

Yes indeed, thatis the squash I am looking for. It's wonderful to see how it accumulated all these different names through the course of time, from "fig leaf gourd" to "shark fin melon". I am pulling some serious strings here to get my hands on it, it's just a matter of time :-). Today I'm starting on the recipe that Daisy included in her post, that one looks the most appealing somehow. I'll post the results later!

 

Thanks for sharing the information!

 

Happy baking!

mnjrutherford's picture
mnjrutherford

Greetings!  My father is from Palma de Mallorca.  Ensaimada is the speciality of Mallorca and is registered.  It is correctly spelled "ensaimada" because the word parts define what the word means.  "Ensaymada" is used variably for the Philippine pastry by the same name.  While the traditional Mallorcan pastry is similar in content structure to the French croisant, the Philippine pastry is more similar to French brioch.  Darn delicious too, I might add!!  =o)

Here is a good page to read about it:  http://www.mallorcaweb.com/reports/traditions/the-ensaimada/

Anyway, I've been trying to figure out the recipe and method for many years.  I have yet to perfect the method, but I do have the ingredients down pat as it is a specific ratio of ingredient to ingredient.  This would be for a kilo of dough:

Flour power: between 45 and 55% m / m  (500 gm high gluten flour)
    Water: 18 to 20% m / m                             (200 gm room temp water)
    Sugar: 16 to 20% m / m                             (200 gm sugar)
    Eggs: 6 to 10% m / m                                  (crack and weigh the liquid egg, usually 4 to 6 depending on size)
    Dough: 4 to 6% m / m                                 (100 gm of my basic wet starter which is 1 part by volume water to 2 parts by volume flour)


I blend these to a scrap dough, cover with a moist towel and allow to rest for an hour.  I then use my mixer fitted with dough hook to knead the dough until it comes away from the bowl, approximately 1 hour on medium low speed.  Slow and gentle is the name of the game with this dough.

I ferment it without folding in a large plastic container with the lid on until it is doubled in volume.  Depending on the ambient temperature this takes from 6 to 12 hours. 

Next, the dough is portioned (10 to 12 pieces), rounded, and rested for an hour before being shaped.

I coat the work surface with lard, my hands, everything is coated in lard.  Using the heel of my hand I smear the dough to a long, thin, rectangle.  I then lift and stretch the dough upward as much as I can.  Now it's a bit like a triangle.  When it starts to tear, I stop.  Roll into a long cigar then twirl the cigar clockwise into a VERY loose snail on the baking sheet.  Allow it to rise until double again.  Another 6 hours or so. 

Bake at about 375 for 15 to 20 minutes.

I like to put a sprinkle of grated Callebaut chocolate at the inside of the roll.  Not a lot, just a sprinkle.  Cherry jam is yummy as well.

This recipe is NOT perfect in my opinion.  But it's as close as I've been able to get so far.  I'd love to hear from others who try it!

freerk's picture
freerk

hey MNJ,

YES!!!! this is wonderful!

As we speak I have 3 ensaimadas proofing. One without filling from one recipe, and two others from another recipe, both with a pumpkin filling (not caballo de angel). One is with, and one is without lard. I didn't have enough lard, but was left with enough dough and filling for another ensaimada, so I went for olive oil. Will be interesting to see the differences.

Your recipe is definitely up next!

Your remark to take it slow and gentle is a good pointer for me. I went at that dough like crazy to develop that gluten. I got there alright, but it also cost me my Kitchen Aid, grrrr ;-)

So far, there's not much going on. The first one has been proofing for 5 hours, has risen slightly, but not as much as expected.

The same goes for the ones with the filling. I suspect that the fermented dough pieces (stiff) were not as active as I remembered. I made it last week or so, so it's still good... I am going to give it a little more time :-)

I was pleasantly surprised that I found it quite easy to stretch and roll the dough. Wether it was luck or wisdom, I will never know, but my counter top gave perfect resistance, without breaking the dough. There was a big window pane on my table :-D I even did the trick with pulling it over the side of the table and using the rolling pin to cut a straight line. I felt proud all three times :-D

Thank you very, very much for this input. I'll post the results of the coming three ensaimadas on here tomorrow, so check back in!

Greets from Amsterdam

Freerk

mnjrutherford's picture
mnjrutherford

GOOD LUCK GOOD LUCK GOOD LUCK!  Getting the paper thin layers is definately a trick!  I have yet to master it.  I don't know how the lamination process will work with olive oil.  I'm really interested in your report on that because we have dropped pork from our diet and olive oil would be my substitution of choice.

Another word regarding the cabello de angel.  It is indeed "ficiolo" or the Shark Fin melon mentioned in another comment.  The moshata type is a different melon all together.  This is not readily available here in the states.  I don't know about Amsterdam.  I have a few precious seeds.  My issue will be to grow it here successfully.  A major trick as it's a very long season, high temp plant.

I eagerly await your report and encourage you to try the shaved chocolate filling. 

freerk's picture
freerk

Hey MNJ,

Not as thin as the Balearic masters for sure, but not too bad either. All in all not bad for a first try

I got some "separation" as you can see.I should have waited longer before putting it in the oven, but I got a little impatient and it was getting rather late, so I went for it.

I found this first try to be a bit on the chewy side...

I have two more fully proofed try outs ready to go into the oven. I left them out the entire night, and they have proofed nicely :-)

I am curious about the olive oil one as well, I don't have very high hopes :-/ Have you ever tried just using butter instead of lard? Technically I don't see a reason why that wouldn't work. Look at it as a rolled up croissant :-)

 

My hopes of finding the "ficiolo" (that IS indeed the one) are dwindling. Reading how much they love the sun and looking out of my window at the typical Dutch summer convinces me of one thing; they will need to be imported and won't grow here :-(

 

But, as you suggest, there are many other fillings, and today I might just browse around for some nice Kallenbaut ;-)

 

What do you think?

 

Freerk

 

 

kim's picture
kim

Hi Freerk and mnjrutherford,

Why it's called Shark's fin melon? It is because the flesh falls away from the fruit in ribbons or strands like spaghetti or shark's fin (when cooked in a soup form - Asian style). You can get them easily at Asian grocery store in US and some of local farmer markets also sell them. Here is garden forum that discuss about the melon:

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/load/asianveg/msg0722541710549.html

I hope both of you have a great weekend.

Kimmy

mnjrutherford's picture
mnjrutherford

I wish I knew about these melons when I lived in the Bay Area where Asian markets abound.  Where I live now the markets are few, far between, and poorly stocked.  Produce is non existent.  I want to try my hand growing them anyhow.  We are working towards being self-sufficient and grow a lot of our own food. 

It will certainly be a great weekend, we are in the middle of our harvest of garlic and potatoes!  YUMMY!!!

freerk's picture
freerk

there's nothing I like more than a NEW POTATO!! enjoy them to the fullest :-)

mnjrutherford's picture
mnjrutherford

Potatoes make a nice dough ya know.  Email me if you would like some very special seeds.  I have a friend who lives in Amsterdam and has an allotment.  He works with potato master. 

 

freerk's picture
freerk

Done!

freerk's picture
freerk

Hey Kimmy,

 

What I understand is that it got that name because it is actually used in a soup ressembling "shark fin soup" (indeed for its strands of "hair").

It's not a melon though, and neither is it a pumpkin. But it  IS a member of the Calebas family, that's what everybody on the net seems to agree on :-)

Checking out your link now!

 

Freerk

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

All under the gourd family Cucurbitaceae (complements WIKI)  

Pick out your favorite!

Those Ensiamadas look really tempting!  Pretty too.  I'm reminded of a fake apple filling using sliced zucchini (the kind that get too big) which has been soaked in lemon juice.   

Mini

freerk's picture
freerk

hey Mini,

 

Amazing how many different names this baby carries (melon, squash,gourd,  pumpkin etc etc.)  And the Spanish lady around the corner calls it a "cidra" which puts her near to Portugal, because that seems to be how they call em over there :-)

Here are some pics of the second batch of ensaimadas with filling (I made a straightforward pumpkin jam)

  

These two were made using a recipe with both olive oil and lard. I made one with and one without lard. I'm not sure, but I think this is the one without the lard, because it is has a lot less separation and crunch to it!

I know, I should have marked them somehow but I forgot. It's very tasty, even though it is more "bready' than my first attempt. I like the texture of my first try the best so far; it comes closest to what I ate  in the Balearic.

I don't get what you mean with the fake apple filling?

X Freerk

mnjrutherford's picture
mnjrutherford

These breads are beautiful.  I don't think it matters how close they come to the Mallorcan version, they are exquisite.  The colors are particularly lovely and appitizing.  I have had occasion to get the dough fully fermented then not had time to carry on with the details required for ensaimada so I've done different things.  I've rolled pieces pan size then layered them with cinnamon sugar and toasted nuts then baked like an American style coffee cake.  I've also used a compound butter sweetened with brown sugar and various spices added then make cinnamon buns.  Everything is wonderful with a unique "Spanish" air to it. 

When it comes to cooking, variety is key.  Variety with ingredients, cooking methods, and handling techniques.  I figure that the more I know, the more capable I am of bringing my family through life successfully.  ;o)  Besides, I don't want to be bored!

freerk's picture
freerk

I sometimes wonder why I seem almost obsessed with baking.

What you say is the best reason I have heard so far. Bakers are here to help family (and the rest of the world) get through life successfully :-D

I am so ready for summer, dinner under a tree, poking up the wood fire and what have you. And it's just around the corner (theoretically, of course in these parts of the world)

The toasted nut layer coffee cake sounds delicious! Spanish cinnamon buns?I wanna know more about that!

Happy baking

Freerk

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

with a little extra fiber from being too big when picked, maybe comes close to the shark-fin you're looking for without all the searching.  Here is a You Tube LINK for mock apple pie.  This used to be done while waiting for the apples to get ripe.  Now we can get apples year round.  You can add lemon or not and the spices are up to you.  Just throwing out ideas here.   Great looking pictures! 

freerk's picture
freerk

Ah, now I understand what you mean!

Checking it out now :-)

I found out you can also get the cabello de angel in a jar :-D just for ease of mind that I made it ALL THE WAY even if only once I'm carefully browsing my adress book and facebook to see who's going to be my victim to bring some back for me, hihi

mnjrutherford's picture
mnjrutherford

You did a wonderful job getting the sheets nice and thin!  I am SO sorry to hear that you managed to execute your Kitchen Aid on the dough.   I've done the same.  Perhaps you can refurbish it?  The problem is probably that the gears immediately over the paddles at the front of the case have been stripped.  New ones can be ordered and they can be replaced.  If you have trouble getting parts because of your location, I could obtain them and send them on.  I have a good relationship with my local parts dealer. 

I would consider butter except that it would completely alter the flavor of the pastry.  :: EN SAIM-ada ::  means "encased with lard", specifically pig fat.  These pastries evolved several hundred years ago during the inquisition.  It was a way for wealthy Jewish persons to "establish" their "Christianity" publicly without actually ripping into a piece of pork.  The sugar and long, intricate procedure made them a bit to expensive for the lower income classes. 

The issue of the sugar is another issue at question.  These were made before Columbus came to the Americas.  Did cane sugar exist in Europe at that time?  Were the original pastries made with cane sugar, beet sugar, or honey?  I've often pondered this.

As for growing "ficifolia" (I think that's the correct spelling), you would need a greenhouse in your part of the world as your growing season is far to short.  On the other hand, I know of gardeners above your latitude (or is it longitude?) who have grown the plants successfully even though they have not been able to acquire fully ripened fruit.

If you can get giandujia...  I think that would be pure heaven in the ensaimada! 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

but in limited quantities mostly for those who could afford it.  Check this out.  Farther down the link, Columbus brought sugar cane to the Americas.

freerk's picture
freerk

Amazing back story!

I thought that "saim" was an Arab word. I would love to read more about it, if you have any links.

I'm deeply in doubt about what to do with my KA. I feel a little 'had' if I will need to pay for it, especially if it's going to cost me a 1/4 of the original price. It's a dirty marketing technique in the end, Apple did the same with me when my graphic card blew just after the warranty ended... Or the guy at the supply store charging me 45€ to replace the cutlery holder of my dishwasher... In today's world I think it's an indecent way of doing business. I might take you up on your offer. I'd rather get the part from you and pay an honest guy that I can easily find out on the net who can repair it for me, than giving some rich guy even more money. Sorry for venting my anger here, but it feels good, hihi

My experiment with the olive oil was not successful. That is to say: the ensaimada became more "bready" instead of the "crunchy" I am looking for, and yes, I do miss the taste of the lard. When baking the lard ones, I noticed the specific smell it produces during the bake. Not necessarily your average baking smell ;-)

I need another Manteca de cerro. I made it from scratch from a chunk of pata negra. I wanna try the stuff they sell in the Spanish store. It doesn't always have to be home made, right?

I think all your questions about sugar have been answered lower in the thread! I love TFL :-D

As far as the infamous ficifolia; I know this girl who does all sorts of squash, pumpkin etc. And she is my best shot. Haven't reached her through my niece yet. Otherwise it will just have to come out of a tin. I should have gotten it at the airport in the first place but I was snooty, hihi

Giandujia, check! I love hearing about things I don't know, call me old fashioned

X Freerk

mnjrutherford's picture
mnjrutherford

"siam" is "lard" in Mallorquin.  Mallorquin is a dialect that is VERY similar to Catalan.  It's possible that it has Moorish influence, but I have no verifiable evidence one way or the other.  Good question though!

Feel free to take me up on the offer.  I detest giving my money to weathly persons for little or no return.  That's why I'm going to learn how to make solar panels... among other things  ;o) 

As for the lard... well...  I confess, I miss pork and pork products intensly.  However, I gave them up for an even greater love so I don't feel like I'm suffering.  I just look for different ways of doing things.  Once we are raising cows, perhaps I'll try beef tallow?  I've heard that the fat around horse kidneys is particularly tasty.  That would be something to try as well.

As for the chocolate...  How about a good hard chocolate heated gently over a double boiler with some good butter and cream.  Mix till completely incorporated then add a shot or two of your favorite liquor.  I would use kirsh or rum.  Cool till hardened and make truffles or serve warm over ice cream or make a chocolate cappucino?

Feelin Crumby's picture
Feelin Crumby

Ahhh, Ibizia. As a young sailor I fell in love with Ms. Anna Maria there . . . .

Oh, wonderful job on the pastry, too!

Jim

freerk's picture
freerk

I'd say: bake an ensaimada in honour of Anna Maria!

Feelin Crumby's picture
Feelin Crumby

Now you're talkin'. Well said, my friend.

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi freerk,

I'm getting obsessed with this bread now too and I haven't even eaten it that I know of!  Still I'm always happy to try a new Spanish or Mallorcan delicacy :-)

I found the site below, which seemed useful as it had photographs of one way of shaping the ensaimada. It also confirms that although angel hair jam might be the desired flavour it is authentic without!

I've put the Spanish link below and the English translation by Google so it's accessible to more bakers.  Just some words of warning about the translation, however. It's obviously machine translated and the 'bot has come up with some offbeat if not downright dangerous translations.

For example, the English text says to coat the inside of the dough with 'butter'. Obviously bakers might choose butter if they don't take lard. However from the Spanish text, ingredient list and photos I'm pretty sure it's lard all the way in this recipe.

The end of the English texts advises: 'Add sugar and oak and glass and got ready to eat'. Might be good for a Surrealist banquet where the loaf is not actually going to be consumed but obviously not good for everyday eating! I'm pretty sure that this is the 'bot's random rendition of something more like 'Sprinkle with icing sugar and these are ready to eat'...

http://ileypanes2.tripod.com/id19.html

http://translate.google.co.uk/translate?hl=en&sl=es&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fileypanes2.tripod.com%2Fid19.html

Mmm...I've got lard. I might try this...

Best wishes, Daisy

 

freerk's picture
freerk

I am just coming back in the house after unsuccesfully trying to "score" lard somewhere, anywhere in this city! It's Pentacoste (the vaguest of national holidays), and more shops are closed than on X-mas day for some reason :-|

So, with no rye to start my new sourdough, a KitchenAid out of service and no manteca to whip up another ensaimada there's only one thing to save the baking day; bring out the old hand mixer and go for something with.... CHOCOLATE!

Glad to hear you might give the ensaimada a try. I found the video on the Madrid tiene Miga blog very useful when it came to shaping! It's a lot of fun, and it worked all three times, even though I anticipated that to be the toughest part of the proces. One thing I  have learned after three tries: use lots of roomtemp manteca, and apply it before stretching the dough to a window pane, it will spread itself practically.

 

Any chocolate recipes that I can try out? :-)

 think i will try this one

Freerk

Daisy, I wish you were my neighbor!

 

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

At least here it is.  Stores are still closed but gas stations are open.  A travel day for all those traveling to their family first communions on Pentecost.   Can't wait to see your chocolate creation.

freerk's picture
freerk

Yup, same here: and these cookies are here to stay! X Freerk

 

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi freerk,

Oh great - you made the Mexican crackle cookies! They look delicious - really crackly and appealing :-).
Great little bites, aren't they? I have to say I'm passing this recipe on down the line, but it's a good 'un. 

I thought you wanted to be neighbours to come and borrow lard LOL! Turned  out I had beef dripping. We had to go and get some lard as well. 

I did make the ensaimada, though, using the technique on the Madrid Tiene Miga video link as advised. Many thanks for recommending that. I rolled a line of homemade almond paste into the collar of the pastry, where the baker on the video uses chocolate. Boy was that tasty :-).

BTW did you see video 2 where they fill the baked ensaimada with pastry cream, sprinkle it with sugar and brand it with a hot iron? That was awesome. 

Man, those things are enormous, though! I can see how they would make a good pastry for a breakfast party. I quartered the amount in a recipe for a kilo, started with a sweet little hand-mixed dough ball about the size of a tea saucer and ended with a coil of pastry that wouldn't fit on the largest plate in our house! I had to put it on a picnic tray. 

I was able to roll the pastry out thinly on a marble slab, and the crust came out good and crunchy and golden. Unfortunately I got so distracted with inserting the almond paste and with other comings and goings in our household that I bungled the lard and had to re-roll, so lost most of the laminations, sadly. I also blame this on having had a wisdom tooth out last week. Have not been quite the full shilling...

It was still delicious tasting, though and not 'lardy' at all. In fact it was one of the lightest pastries I've ever tasted. Thanks for putting me on to this. I'll have to have a second try to get my head round the laminations. It's an interesting alternative to the fold and turn form of lamination. 

There should be some pictures below:

Wishing you continued happy baking and lots of delicious chocolate creations! Daisy_A

 

freerk's picture
freerk

Even after bungling the lard, it looks very tasty! Next time I'm going to make it with even more lard; I see them use ridiculous amounts in the video, and Madrid Tiene Madre ( I think) also writes somewhere to use more than you think is "normal". And I'm dying to try MNJ's recipe,but I need the real Manteca to to do that. Maybe I have some time to run out and see if some of the shops that carry it are open today.

 

And yes, I want myself one of those very manly irons that I can set fire to my pastries with as well.... mmm, saying that, I wonder... if my old and never used clothing iron (also just man enough to hate ironing, hihi) would do the job.....

 

I want you to be my neighbour so we can exchange the most beautiful pastries and breads! But this works as well :-), I guess on TFL we are all neigbours.

 

For today I have a Filone going (the dough is way too slack, giving me a headache, so I just threw it into a banneton and hope it will come out in one piece. I am going to try a cold bake, at least the dough will have some integrity, I hope. I love my Filone, but extra finely milled Durum is very hard to come by at the moment, even the baker that sometimes gives me a kilo or 2 is holding out on me... wonder why that is? Against better judgement I'm using Durum that is just "fine", let's see what comes out :-)

 

AND my Tortano dough is happily autolysing in the kitchen. That one looks promising, I'll keep you posted!

The crackled chocolate cookies were a total hit. I'm receiving a friend today for a "computer lesson" (me being the teacher) and I sort of baked them for his visit. There's four left..... hardly something you can make a nice presentation with, hihi

 

Speak to you soon! and if you make a second ensaimada, be sure to post it here, I wanna see!!!!

 

X Freerk

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi freerk,

Yes it would be good to be near enough to exchange pastries. I was eyeing your pandoros in the snow rather wistfully when they were made...

Loved the story about the crackle cookies. I imagine the chap has come and gone by now. You probably thought of this but another time maybe slip them into a little box? Works for macaron sellers, no? More than a day's wages for 4 macarons? Ah but they are in a lovely box....

Probably can't say we have never been there... However, it also reminds me of the scene in The Importance of Being Earnest when Algie and Earnest prepare cucumber sandwiches for Lady Bracknell, eat them all and then persuade the butler to come in and say 'There were no cucumbers in the market this morning, sir [...] Not even for ready money'. I guess this is the situation with fine durum wheat? Hope that some turns up soon. Filone looked great.

I'm definitely doing the ensaimada again. It was one of the most delicious cakes I've ever eaten. Thanks again for the introduction. I thought I heard in the video that the baker said they retarded it for 24 hours. Following a suggestion by Andy for croissants I wondered about retarding it before a breakfast party. Problem is getting it in the fridge. The one I made was a version with only 1 egg and it was huge. I guess the 4-6 egg versions feed the whole extended family and friends. I am thinking for test runs to beat half an egg, freeze half and try a half egg version. I did use lots of lard - 3  times the amount on the original scaled down version (75g rather than 25).

Re using the domestic iron. I take it this is half in jest but my prediction would be that first time out the iron would get covered in burnt sugar and seize up. That would prove to be even more difficult that returning the Kitchen Aid. What were you doing sir when the appliance broke? Why merely ironing some sugar, as one does...Might be worth checking traditional ironmongers if in Spain or the Balearic islands? My experience of mainland Spain is that they still carry iron goods for home cooking. 

Glad to see the Tortano also came out so well. Have a left a comment on that other post.

Wishing you continued happy baking! Daisy

 

freerk's picture
freerk

Both filone and Tortano were delicious :-) The durum wheat I had, behaved much nicer than expected and yielded a very tasty slug :-)

 

Actually, you might know this: is it even possible to put a wet dough in a wicker banneton? I did it again, and even after making sure that I really flowered that thing royally, the dough still managed to get stuck. My guess is; wet doughs and wicker bannetons are a nono, but what sort of banneton would work? I got myself a big piece of linen today to see if i can construct myself a couche that'll do the job. plastic and some oil? Do you use a couche?

 

X Freerk

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi freerk,

Glad the durum you had worked so well!

Wet doughs in wicker bannetons are fine. You have to get a really fine, non-glutinous rice flour and dust really well with that, right up to the top of the basket. In between just shake out the loose bits of flour and let the banneton dry without wetting it in an airy place in order to keep it seasoned. Doughs should pop out no problem. 

I have a 'couche' (very stiff, old, linen tablecloth),  but I tend to use it for torpedo shaped loaves and multiple batches of smaller loaves. You can see it in use on the thread below. After flouring it and pulling material up between the loaves, I covered the loaves with the rest of the material. I think professional bakers pull the linen up even more between the loaves. I think at first I used durum flour to dust the couche, but now I only use rice flour as it is the best flour I can find to prevent sticking. Most professional bakers say that the professional couches are even better. The Jan Hedh formula on this link calls for Durum flour. Let me know if you try it - it's one of my favourite breads!

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/19216/sourdough-wholemeal-lemon-bread-adaptation-jan-hedh-formula

I also have some elasticated cotton covers for my bannetons. I hardly use these, however. Firstly I like the banneton marks and secondly the rice four does such a good job. I can imagine I would use them if I needed a smooth surface on a loaf, for example if I wanted to do lovely stencils, like breadsong does. Not got that far yet...Covers are great for other things in the meantime, though - like straining berry sauces. Just put the elasticated bit over a bowl and you're away.

Do try rice flour if you have not tried it so far. It is really great for stopping sticking. I use in on the peel and also sometimes a light dusting on the top of a very wet loaf before inverting it for peeling. 

Best wishes, Daisy

freerk's picture
freerk

Hey buurvrouw! (neigbour in dutch)

Aha, so that's why there is a big bag of rice flour in my cupboard! I knew there was a very good reason why I bought it at the mill about 4 weeks ago, even though at the time my bannetons were still quietly hiding at the rail way museum shop (!) somewhere in Germany, where my sister discovered and brought them home for 4,99 a pop. Sometimes life is sweet.

Arm with rice flour I must myself; may be with me the force!

I got the thickest linen I could find, not even close to the thickness I had in mind :-| I'm giving it a spin. I have these sausages made out of plastic bags with lentils and beans that I use to keep my dough in shape. I think I have virtually spent this year's tax return 3 times already, but nevertheless, I must get myself a pro one!

I finally got my lard source! A quality butcher in the heart of the Jewish district (it seems to become a theme) has it the way I want it: clarified, sifted, nice wrapper around it, cheap as it should be, no additives. Thank you! I also got the beef version, although I have no idea yet what to do with it :-) but I thought; if my neighbour has it, I need it as well!

Elasticated cotton covers, mmmmmmm. My sister is handy with that kind of thing, and come to think of it, I can imagine plastic saddle covers in this bike heaven that also would do the trick :-)

The lemon bread is added to the list. Sounds interesting!

Freerk

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi freerk,

'Buurvrouw' - that's a lovely word for neighbour! I like that about TFL that we can wander into each other's virtual kitchens and see what's cooking and get support.

Glad you got some good lard! It sounds like you have a good source now.
Also the German bannetons do sound sweet. They are supposed to be some of the best and can be a lot to import. What a generous sister! 

The linen also sounds good and rice flour should do the trick for the dusting. 

You tickled me over the beef fat. To know more about why your buurvrouw has beef fat it's worth knowing where your buuvrouw grew up. Answer: the North of England where beef fat is the traditional medium for frying chips. Not that we have chips with everything - we don't. They are a special treat and we've mostly been taking them as we seem to remember eating them in Amsterdam, actually. That is in a cone of paper with mayonnaise. Northern style is normally in newspaper, with salt and malt vinegar, a pickled something (onion, gherkin, egg), and Vimto...Still with a bed full of organic potatoes coming to fruition I am thinking of things to go alongside the more regular tortilla española and patatas bravas. Ideas welcomed! 

  

Do let me know if you do the lemon bread - I find it a lovely bread. I'd also be pleased to know if you bake the ensaimada again. Thanks again for introducing me to such a lovely pastry. Wishing you continued happy baking! Daisy_A

freerk's picture
freerk

salt n malt vinagar, mmmmmmm!

 

I am going into 2 weeks of a lot of work, but I am most certainly going to make the ensaimada again when I have the time! I'll let you know!

 

Yesterday my manitoba flour arrived, and I'm dying to make something with it, but it'll have to wait :-)

 

have a nice weekend!

 

freerk

 

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi freerk,

Ensaimada 2 is cooling its boots on our rickety old cooling rack as I write. Even made with 1/2 an egg (other 1/2 whipped and frozen for the next try), it's as big as a plate! Let's see how this one turns out.

 

Best wishes, Daisy

freerk's picture
freerk

Looking wonderful again Daisy!

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Second ensaimada was even crunchier than the first (which was also pleasantly crunchy). I definitely got better separation of the layers on this one and the almond paste stayed under its 'collar'. I shaped so over-zealously the first time I managed to mash the almond paste throughout the dough. This made me wonder if this is how pandoro work, but it wasn't the effect I was looking for!

This version looks much more like the picture you posted in your first entry. However I also followed through Kimmy's useful links and that version was much more open and cake-like, like the first one I baked. Problem is I've not really sampled these lovely little cakes in their traditional setting so am not so sure what I am aiming for. Maybe some fieldwork is in order? :-).

Hope work goes well. Glad your flour came through. I have responded on the other post. Hope you enjoy using it.

Best wishes, Daisy

freerk's picture
freerk

I would definitely recommend a nice stay in the hills of Ibiza to do some fieldwork! We were unlucky weather wise, but hey, I might have never left the beach to discover the ensaimada if the sun would have been out all the time. Plus the rain was a blessing for the horrible forest fire the island suffered just prior to our arrival.

Crunchy is good! I did eat the traditional no filling one, and I still regret not buying the cabello de angel at the airport :-| my guess is it would be just slightly less crunchy with the filling if one manages to keep it in check in the collar, like you did. That is what they use the excess pieces for in the video, right? That's how interpreted it.

Great job! Now I wish there would be something like taste-mail :-)

Freerk

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi freerk,

Ibiza sounds interesting. I've heard the interior is beautiful.

Yes taste-mail on TFL would be great! I did follow the video by rolling a strip over the edge of a marble board, cutting the excess and using it as a collar. I grasped the rolling up a lot better on the second ensaimada, but the collar worked well to encapsulate the filling.

Best wishes, Daisy

LiliN's picture
LiliN

I baked Ensaimadas mallorquinas today, using this recipe, and here is the result:

Filled with my homemade pumpkin jam

We all like it very much. Happy baking

freerk's picture
freerk

A bit of a late response, but boy do those ensaimadas look appatizing or what!

rolls's picture
rolls

i've been wanting to try this also, the first recipe i stumbled upon and which i really want to try is this one:

 

http://www.deliciousdays.com/archives/2009/07/31/ensaimadas/

if anyone has tried, please let us know how you got on :)

 

rolls's picture
rolls

tried the recipe today, these pastries are the best! :) posted pics here http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/26283/ensaimadas-so-much-easier-croissants#comment-195939

freerk's picture
freerk

They look really good!

rolls's picture
rolls

Thank you, I forgot to mention that I used butter not lard :)