The Fresh Loaf

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Feeding the Tribbles Again...

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proth5's picture
proth5

Feeding the Tribbles Again...

 For the one or two of you following my continuing work with triticale, the Great Triticale Crisis of 2011 had me down to my very last bag of tribble food which finally I decided to mill.


In the meantime, with the help of MiniOven, I found a paper from researchers at Colorado State University that contained the vital Mixograph and Absorption numbers that might help me make a breakthrough.  Turns out that hydrations over 68% produce an elastic "wheat like" dough from triticale while lower hydrations produced the putty like dough that had convinced me to treat triticale like rye.


The Mixograph results showed that triticale would have a lot less mixing tolerance than wheat (had to be careful not to overmix) and the researchers reported that they had no success using a Hobart dough hook, but better results with the paddle attachment.


The work in this paper was done with white triticale flour, so I decided to mill a "closer to white" flour than I had been using.  I followed my standard wheat milling process to get about an 85% extraction flour.


I decided on a very simple formula with 30% of the flour pre fermented in a 68% hydration levain based pre ferment.  4% shortening, 4% milk powder, 2% salt, 1.2% instant  yeast, 1% honey, and 69% water. (Calculation of the weights left as an exercise for the reader - it's really just a basic "sandwich loaf" formula - loaded pretty heavily with yeast.)  I mixed for about four minutes with the Kitchen Aid paddle attachment, the switched to the dough hook - which worked well for me -  for another 2 minutes.


The dough was a very soft, sticky dough, but was fairly elastic with what I would consider low/ moderate gluten development.


Thinking that I was now dealing with more of a wheat like dough than a rye, I gave it an hour of bulk fermentation - during which it actually doubled - which had not happened before with the triticale dough.


It was a mess to shape and my shaping flaws probably influenced the crumb , but it doubled nicely in the pan.


I baked it for 35 minutes at 375F and for the first time in my experience with triticale dough, got some oven spring.


The results are pictured below. 


 


Not shredibly soft or fluffy, but for a near whole grain flour of a grain that is considered inferior  for bread baking - not bad at all.  Although light can shine through the slice, it was sturdy and stood up to handling and soft butter. I should have included something to show scale, but it is a nicely sized slice for a sandwich.


I am informed that my new shipment of triticale is winging its way to me as I type and I'll be able to continue this general track of baking.  Next time I will lower the hydration somewhat  (to take the hydration of the honey into better account)and give it a longer bulk ferment with a fold.  In general I don't feel the need to do intensive mix for these panned breads and the Mixograph readings tell me that I can over-mix very quickly, so I don't think I will be increasing mix length by much, if at all.


As an aside, some of my reading tells me that triticale was once considered an acceptable bread grain and was widely used in the North American West, but the structure of farm subsidies encouraged wheat production and triticale became less used for human consumption and because of its high yields and superior protein content was used for more for animal feed.  It forces me to think about how policies determined in some far away corridor of power can impact what we eat and how we think of things.


I am more encouraged on the triticale quest than I ever have been.  People keep remarking that the bread is unusually delicious.  Time to get cracking on some real formula development.

Comments

RonRay's picture
RonRay

I may have missed it. but I did read through, how does it taste?

Ron

proth5's picture
proth5

I find the taste of triticale to be quite delicious - and I have added it to wheat based breads in small amounts to good effect.

The 100% triticale bread has a pleasant taste - like whole wheat with a bit of rye (obvious, given its parentage.)

My faithful limo driver and bread taster likes it very much... 

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Some time ago, I was interested in its nature. But at that, as I recall, it was quite limited with yearly variation in supply. Your post was the first recent mention of it that has caught my eye.

Thanks for the info ;-)

Ron

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

If 68% hydration is the boundary between rye-like and wheat-like behavior in triticale doughs,  why not try higher hydrations?  It sounds as though you are planning to nail the 68% number, accounting for the honey's water contribution, in your next bake.  Does it have something to do with the  "very soft, sticky dough" and "it was a mess to shape" comments on this bake, which was at 69% hydration?

I have zero experience with triticale, so I'm interested to know how this plays out.

Paul

 

proth5's picture
proth5

is that the dough will still be soft at 68% hydration, but this dough was ciabatta like in consistency - although - and I realize you don't have the expereince of handing both the lower hydration dough (which really was like putty) and the 69+% dough which was very much like a high hydration wheat dough - the transformation was quite astounding.  This leads me to believe there is a magic number - where the dough is elastic, but not fluid.  68% gave the best mixing curve on the mixograph - so I'm thinking that's the magic number.

My other thinking is to treat the 68% hydration dough like a high hydration wheat dough and give it a fold or two to bring it into line.  Because the mixing tolerance is pretty low I'm reluctant to give it longer mixer time, but folds might be a good solution.

I have to constantly remind myself  that these studies are oriented towards traditional commercial production and don't always introduce techniques that more hands - on artisan bakers would use...

Hope this is helpful.

When I get my new supply, I'm really anxious to try these theories - because I've been wrong before...

Pat

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

I hadn't picked up from your original post that the 69% hydration drove the dough into ciabatta-land.  That's definitely more than I would want to try to wrangle into a loaf pan.  And yet it produced such an even crumb!  Not at all like a ciabatta's crumb.  'Tis a strange and wonderful stuff, this triticale.  Sounds like you are still dealing with the "strange" aspect and in search of the "wonderful" part.

Paul

proth5's picture
proth5

Well, whern you are right, you are right.  Although the 69% hydration was runny and sticky, 68% was worse.  I got a rye like crumb, but not as much volume.

This is tricky stuff.  I will have several strong cups of Earl Grey tea and contemplate my next move...

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

The ol' sd punch?   If rye responds well to sour, would triticale respond as well giving a nicer dough at the 68% hydration? 

Mini

proth5's picture
proth5

at the formula again, you will notice that I gave it a significant sourdough (levain) punch.  I do think this helped as the papers I have read make allusions to dough conditioners - of which a levain pre ferment is one...

Yeah, much work to go...

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Pat,

Very interested in the consideration you are giving to hydration levels as optimum.   I'm sure you are quite right in assumptions made thus far, and Mini's research paper must have been revelatory.

However, I note you imply your precious grain is now ageing somewhat.   I wondered if you had taken this into account, as this often means some degree of drying out.   Would you anticipate adding more water to your flour now, than if you were making the same dough when you first bought the Triticale you are currently using?

All good wishes

Andy

proth5's picture
proth5

a new batch this weekend and kept thinking "I should have tempered this to 14% moisture content."   I have a very good grain moisture meter and could have measured that.  Why I did not do it, I do not know.  Write it off to my "real" job which is taking up way too much of my mental energy as of late.

But, great minds...

Actually, the batch I am working with is "new" and sealed quite tightly,  but I think the tempering process woulod be useful.

Please let me know ant other thoughts, because this is a great tasting grain and I feel it is neglected...

Thanks for the goo wishes - I really need them!

Pat

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I got an idea...  what if half the dough is mixed like wheat and the other half like a rye and then epoxy them together.  

Or what about the hot soaker or water roux?   It amazes me how much sticky that little process takes out of the dough (don't expect a miracle of sticky free.) Between 5-10% of the flour heated up with 5 times water?  Nuke it, it goes faster.  Twenty seconds on high, stir, 20 more sec, stir,  make sure you get up to 60°C and let it cool.  Weigh the mixture first before nuking so you can add back any lost water.     

Just mulling this around in my head...  

Mini

proth5's picture
proth5

I took a major step back my last bake and I started to wonder if I hadn't made a mistake by loading the dough up with yeast (great minds...) and if I shouldn't try a "no knead"  style with this grain.

Water roux is also something I've been considering.

This all goes slowly for me because of my schedule - and because next time I'm pretty set on the fact I must temper before milling which takes valuable elapsed time at home - which is in short supply right now.

I'll file the epoxying in the back of my mind if this latest thought turns out to be a dead end.

Thanks

Pat

Joyful Whisper's picture
Joyful Whisper

For all the work you have put into triticale recipes. I have been using a simple recipe for many years so I look forward to using the information you have provided. Triticale is one of my favorite grains.