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% of sourdough in pizza

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patnx2's picture
patnx2

% of sourdough in pizza

I've been reading a pizza blog and there was a discussion about doing long ferments using small amounts of sourdough starter. One user mentioned using a 5% mix with an 18 hour room temp ferment. Does this sound right? I wonder what's the difference in results vs cold ferment. Also could this be used to do artisan bread with what different results.Flavor amd crumb? I will be trying some experements.  Any ideas would be nice to hear if it might same me some mistakes.   Patrick


 

rossnroller's picture
rossnroller

Hi patnx2. I've been home-baking sourdough pizzas for quite a while now. Now and then I try other yeasted recipes, including some that have poolishes and extended fermentations, but to my taste there is no comparison with the flavour you get from a good SD pizza. Then again, I like traditional thin-crust pizzas, so factor that in.


I've got my recipe and directions on my blog, as well as some background you might find interesting. See: Sourdough Pizzas - As Good As Home Oven Pizzas Get


If you've got access to a woodfired oven, so much the better!


Let us know how it goes.


Cheers
Ross


 


 

spacey's picture
spacey

I find that my best results recently have been with 2-4% sourdough starter mixed in 2 kilos of AP flour, allowed to bulk for 2-8 hours (it depends on whether I forget it before I go to sleep - DOH!) and then letting the dough proof and warm up for 2-3 hours after taking it out of the fridge and doing some stretch+fold on the bulk of the dough before shaping little rounds for the pizza.


I prefer thin crusts, and this makes dough that tastes great, isn't too sour, and is easy to stretch using either the slap+fold or just a hanging stretch technique.

patnx2's picture
patnx2

about 18 hour warm ferment. warm being about 70F. Any ideas about how or if it could be used with bread with what results? Patrick

spacey's picture
spacey

18 hours, in my experience, is about the outer edge of what you can do with sourdough.  Even with 2-3% starter, when the hydration is above 65%, greater than 12 hours is when the acids start to make the gluten weaker, which makes handling much more difficult for pizza.  It's a bit easier with breads if you treat it as you would a high-hydration no-knead, but again after 18 hours I haven't had much luck in getting a good oven spring. 


The water in your area may be harder, which could make longer ferments reasonable.  In NYC our water is very soft.  Salts slow down fermentation, so my experience would probably be different if I was using harder water.

rossnroller's picture
rossnroller

That's way too long @ 70F in my experience, patnx2. I retard my pizza dough for as long as 3 days, but that's in the fridge.


As spacey indicates, you'll be battling to get much oven spring if you leave it that long. Even with a thincrust pizza, you don't want it flat and dense and without some nice airy lift in the thicker parts towards the rim.

patnx2's picture
patnx2

Thanks spacyand rossnroller. I' ll post any experiments. Patrick