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Need suggestions on mixers

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Caramel's picture
Caramel

Need suggestions on mixers

Hello,


I'm trying to buy a new mixer for bread and laminated dough. I already have a kitchen aid for everyday use, and wanted to buy a good and strong spiral mixers with a reasonable price. I only bake for my family and friends, so looking into 8, 10 or 12 quarts size for 1-2 KG dough. Not sure what kind of brands is good out there, so I need everyone's help. I was looking to Eurodib, Anvil, Univex, globe or Centaur mixers. Does anyone familiar with those brands?


Thank you..

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Mixers is a topic that has been pretty thoroughly discussed here at TFL, so you might start out by doing a search using the TFL search bar.  You'll find lots of opinions and once you've explored those threads, do post any questions. 


 

Caramel's picture
Caramel

I will. Thanks. I'm new and still exploring the website.

verminiusrex's picture
verminiusrex

I got a 10 qt Anvil mixer about 2 years ago for making bagels at the local farmer's market. I destroyed my KA600 doing bagel dough, the Anvil is a countertop commercial mixer built for that kind of work My usual bread dough has about 2 lbs of flour in it (total dough about 3.25 lbs when liquid is added, I wouldn't go higher than that). It takes up about the same space as a KA600 but sits a few inches taller.

Caramel's picture
Caramel

Thank you for the suggestion. Just curious, do you use your Anvil to mix anything else? Or just strickly for bread dough?

Grimaldi 1's picture
Grimaldi 1

I picked up a Univex 20 quart off of craigslist awhile back and the thing is built like a tank. They are commercial mixers and are not for everyone...over 300 lbs, so moving them is major issue.


We are doing a monthly market selling wood-fired pizzas and had to have something big enough for 20lb dough batches (several). I burned up the KA just experimenting, so, anything home kitchen level wasn't going to get it done.


Univex is as heavy duty as Hobart, but you can find them used for probably half of what the same size Hobart goes for.

SurebetVA's picture
SurebetVA

If you have any of the attachments to the Kitchen Aid you might want to research Hobart 10 quart C-100 or C-100T.  They have the same #10 hub as the kitchen Aid.  They haven't been manufactured in 20 years or more but are usually available on Ebay for $900 - $1100 if that's in your budget.


I have one that I really love.


 

Leolady's picture
Leolady

The church I loaned my C-100 mixer is in LOVE with it.  There are some that look good to me on Ebay right now I was looking at recently. 


When I say look good to me, I mean that from the descriptions the mixers work properly, although they may not be cosmetically perfect. 


You can always get a good working mixer painted, but you may find yourself in over your head trying to get a perfect looking mixer to perform well.  JMHO


 


 

Caramel's picture
Caramel

Hello Everyone,


Thanks for all the reply. I just moved recently, so It was hard to find time to go online. Although I have to admit everytime I look, it seems that it is much easier to find used Hobart 20 qt rather than the smaller one including other brands. Sometimes they even have the same price. So, I really dont know what to get now. 20 qt seems to be overkill for me, a home baker.


Thanks again, Everyone..

SurebetVA's picture
SurebetVA

I have seen 20 quarts cheaper on Craigslist sometimes.  Some important info for your decision is that the A200 20 quart weighs about twice as much at 200lbs and has a #12 hub.  The upside is attachments and bowls (both SS & Plastic) are much easier to find and cheaper.  Hope that helps.

Jeff Whatley's picture
Jeff Whatley

For what it's worth, I recently looked at the Centaur mixer and did not like its build quality.  It was plastic where it should have been steel.  It looked pretentious but I got the feeling that it would not hold up like my old standby, the KA-5A.  Subsequently, I tried the new Hobart 50 but it was not all that much more machine than the one I had.  Finally, I viewed te Qlobe 10 quart mixer and really fell for it.  Weiging over two hundred pounds, it is a beast but a good-looking beast. It does everything and then some.  It is the first planetary mixer that I have worked with that is almost as good as my SP-5 spiral mixer.  Highly reccommended.

Caramel's picture
Caramel

Okay.. So I went online last night and do more research. I like Hobart C-100, but some people had some problems with it. I'm afraid once its broken, I wont be able to fix it. Besides I dont have any attachment for my KA. I also got a chance to look at Hobart A-120 personally yesterday. It was a beauty. But not sure if I should get that. It's really heavy. Univex is also way too heavy for us. It might kill my husband's back. LOL..


I also looked at Anvil 10 qt,  globe 8 qt and Thunderbird 10 qt. I even called pleasanthillgrain.com to ask about the thunderbird, and they recommended the Electrolux DLX instead. They said it is almost as good as any commercial stand mixers for half the price. Especially for a home baker like me.. Yikes, I even more confused. I want to invest a good mixer and ready to spend around more and less $1300.. 


So please help guys.... Thanks again..

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi,


Reading your original post, I gather you want a mixer that can handle up to 2 kg of dough. The DLX or Bosch Universal Plus will handle this without even breathing hard. They can handle twice this weight, in fact. Getting a larger capacity mixer seems not only a waste of money but they are optimized for larger batches and may not mix your 2 kg dough as well.


If you have some compelling reason for getting a spiral mixer, that's another story. But why use an elephant gun to swat a fly?


Am I missing something?


David

proth5's picture
proth5

Yes, it's expensive and heavy.  Yes, it may be overkill.


But for mixing larger amounts of bread dough a spiral is just the thing.  Really.  I've used the big boys and loved them.  Now I have my own mini and while I'm having to adjust a few things, it is a joy.  It is a specialized tool that does a specialized thing very, very well. (And in the general price range that you mention)


SP-5 from TMB.  That's my bad boy...


Won't say you can't make good bread without one, because we all know that's not true.


Won't say any number of other mixers won't do a splendid job.


No, they are not for everyone, but if you want to mix doughs for bread like products, they will not disappoint.

Caramel's picture
Caramel

I'm familiar with the mixer. I go to SFBI classes once in a while. I love the people. Michel is such a nice guy. Anyway, I saw the SP5 from TMB. But too bad it is only have 1 speed. And I heard the cleaning process is hard, since you can't take the bowl out. But overall it really is a good mixer. SFBI even have a special student rate for it.

proth5's picture
proth5

Yes, too bad on that one speed, but I'm finding that it is a sufficient speed for getting good dough development.


Cleaning process - many spirals have fixed bowls so I've learned some tricks (Because I've had to clean big spirals) - Mostly, just after mixing, spray the bowl with water (you know from one of those pump sprayers...) and cover the bowl with a damp towel.  In 15 minutes or so, sponge the mixer bowl and spiral hook, use soap if you want and then sponge the thing again.  Use the wet towel to wipe out what you can reach.  Turn the mixer on for a brief time to expose parts of the bowl that were hiding behind the dough hook and repoeat the sponging/wiping in those areas.  Fold a paper towel int fourths, put it on the bottom of the mixer and turn the thing on to pick up anything hiding under the hook and done.


Sounds like a lot of steps, but they go fast and it's not too bad.  (Of course some days my alternative is hauling out the pond vac and cleaning the pond - so it may be relative.)  Not as easy as plunking the whole thing into the dishwasher, but I've heard the complaint that it is hard to clean also so I expected a lot more hassle than I found...


Good luck with your choice.  I am really enjoying my SP5.  I always wish that others should enjoy their choices as much as I do mine.  That's all that matters.


Happy Mixing!

Caramel's picture
Caramel

Thanks for tips. Lots of SFBI students love their SP5 mixers. You're right.. Everybody should enjoy their mixer. It is an expensive investment. Not to mention, they take alot of space in the kitchen.

Caramel's picture
Caramel

Hi David,


Yeah.. I only going to mix for up to 2 KG. Maybe more if we're going to have a party or something. But overall it is only for my family. I was told to buy about 8-10 quarts of spiral mixer. I go to baking classes once in a while, and love the 20 quarts spiral mixers. I always wanted to have a smaller one at home.


I will consider the DLX mixer. Have you use one before? Do you like it?

berryblondeboys's picture
berryblondeboys

Many of us have DLX mixers here (as well as the Bosch Universal). I have a love hate relationship with the dlx. I love the open top making it easy to monitor the dough, adding ingredients and so on. What I struggle with is getting it to mix without constantly having to intervene/help. THOUGH, I'm still learning (even after 5 years). Like, just the other day, I realized that making cookie dough is WAY better if I turn up the speed as it whips the butter off the beater. I've gone back and forth with the roller versus dough hook and today, I barely had to do anything with the roller and scraper, where the other day I had to 'help' every 10-15 seconds.


I keep looking at other mixers too and there are so many great options, but, besides the bosch and DLX mixers, you got to spend a lot more money and add a lot of bulk. Huh... I used to think the DLX was expensive - I guess it's all relative, because now I realize it's quite the bargain really.

Caramel's picture
Caramel

Yeah.. I read alot of DLX reviews in this website. Almost all of them said they have to babysit while it's mixing. Thanks for the reply. I will think about it.

Eidetix's picture
Eidetix

What follows is a list of 10-quart Web-offered stand mixers, arranged alphabetically by manufacturer with item weight, advertised cost and retail advertiser noted for each. Unless otherwise specified, prices are for new mixers.


I have no knowledge as to quality regarding any of these units. It seems difficult to get testimonials on mixers of this size, a fairly narrow niche between home and commercial baking applications. At these prices, it would be prudent to try before you buy.


(.com is implied in all retailers' names. Prices are current as of Nov. 5, 2010. Much of the following information is obtainable through NextTag.com.)


Good luck. Let us know what you settle on.


Anvil ⎯ 52 lbs. ⎯ $1,200 ⎯ Kirby Supply

Berkel FMS10 ⎯ 122 lbs. ⎯ $1,575 ⎯ KaTom

Centaur CEM110 ⎯ 166 lbs. ⎯ $855 ⎯ Restaurant Source


Eurodib/Linkrich ⎯ 128 lbs. ⎯ $943 ⎯ Amazon

General GEM110 ⎯ 166 lbs. ⎯ $937 ⎯ LionsDeal

Globe SP-10 ⎯ 132 lbs. ⎯ $2,028 ⎯ Burkett Restaurant Equipment, two others

Hobart C100 ⎯ 91 lbs. ⎯ $1,450 used (untraceable new) ⎯ eBay

Hobart HL120 (12 quart) ⎯ 189 lbs. ⎯ $4,413 ⎯ various

Uniworld UPM-10E ⎯ 198 lbs. ⎯ $823 ⎯ Amazon

Vollrath 4075 Dynasty Series ⎯ 52 lbs. ⎯ $1,000 ⎯ thewebrestaurant store

SurebetVA's picture
SurebetVA

Great summary Eidetix.  I would add there are refurbished Hobart C-100's on Ebay right now for $935. 


Also I would add Thunderbird to that list at 74 lbs and $1,150 new


Plus I saw a Thunderbird 10 Qt sell last week on Ebay used for I think $420. 


I believe the Anvil & Vollrath are the same mixer or at least built by the same company. 


I saw the Eurodib 10 quart on Costco's website for $799 with shipping and handeling included.  Sam's club has the Berkel at $1,660 with shipping included.


Wonderful to have so much to choose from.


 

Caramel's picture
Caramel

Thanks Eidetix & Surebeth.. Awesome list... It really helps...

nonna3js's picture
nonna3js

I have been looking on line at the 10 qt Uniworld mixer.  I really want a Hobart but it's a little pricey.  I am not familiar at all with Uniworld and haven't found any reviews.  Anybody out there have one?  I live in a small community so on line is all I have to go on.  What is it that makes the huge price difference?

Nonna

fpatton's picture
fpatton

After reading numerous reviews of various mixers here and elsewhere, I just ordered the 20 quart Uniworld from my local restaurant supply house. The 10 quart model doesn't seem to be rated for any sort of stiff dough, but the owner said he guaranteed I wouldn't have any trouble using the 20. He also said his mother uses this mixer for tamales!

I had just about settled on a used Hobart A200, but was balking at the price of repair parts. There was also a comment here about used Hobarts really being USED Hobarts, and that started to worry me.

This will replace a plastic-geared KA 5 quart that I inherited from my grandmother. I've personally replaced two gearboxes in it in the past two months. Sadly, when I got her shiny new one, I gave away my 30-year-old Hobart-built unit, not realizing that they weren't that tough anymore.

When the mixer arrives, I'll post a review.

thomaschacon75's picture
thomaschacon75

I'm the one who caused you worry about used Hobarts. I think you made the right decision in avoiding them.

The mixer you purchased has many brand names, Uniworld, Bakemax, etc.

I own the Bakemax version and can assure you that you've purchased one fantastic mixer.

http://www.bakemax.com/equipment/food-service-equipment/planetary-mixers/20qt-encore-planetary-mixer/

fpatton's picture
fpatton

Thanks! I noticed that there seem to be a variety of names attached to the same mixer. I also picked up a used 12 quart bowl for it, and have bead on a compatible whip and paddle. (My supplier said the Uniworld and Hobart are completely compatible for attachments and bowls. Hope he was right!)

Can't wait for the mixer to arrive! I've got a sourdough starter that's looking for a big batch of bread.

Fred

thomaschacon75's picture
thomaschacon75

I wanted to get the Hobart meat grinder attachment, but couldn't swallow the $700 price tag. I don't eat $700 of meat in 5 years!

I never actually thought about getting a 12-quart bowl. Not really sure the 12 qt bowl will work with the 20 qt bowl lift, but it might. (I just took a closer look at mine and I don't see how that would work; maybe one can purchase bowl extenders for the arms or something?). You'll be pleased to know that the 20 qt bowl and attachments work just fine with smaller quantities, like 2x of a home recipe. You don't need to 5x everything, although it's tempting. 

My mixer was delivered in a giant wooden crate. It took me half a day and a lot of swearing to get it out of that box. The feet are bolted to the crate. I decided to leave it bolted to the piece the feet are bolted to (like having it sit on a foundation instead the floor). That was a good decision, because much more than 5 lbs of dough and it'll start to rock. If you're not careful, it has the power to tip itself over. I'd suggest leaving it bolted if yours arrives as mine did (or, if you want to spend the money, buy a compatible stand you can bolt it to).

If yours is identical to mine, it has a warning feature. It'll tell you in no uncertain terms (makes a strange sound that'll make you think you broke it) that it's not happy when you've put too much dough in the bowl (or are using too high a speed for the amount of dough).

fpatton's picture
fpatton

That's good to know about the smaller quantities. I did wonder about that.

I got a reinforced work table that I intend to bolt the mixer to. The 12 quart bowl isn't a standard one - it's a Hobart part that is meant specifically for 20 quart mixers. The whip and the paddle are non-standard, but are also designed to go with it. (Apparently the dough hooks are almost impossible to find, but I don't intend to use the 12 qt for dough.) Anyway, since the guy said the Uniworld and Hobart are completely compatible for attachments, I figured it would be okay. I'll report back when they all arrive.

As far as the meat grinder goes, it's not a Hobart, it's a Uniworld or some other Chinese-made equivalent. They had two varieties, one that looked like junk, and the other that seemed pretty heavy-duty. (I used to work in a machine shop, and have some experience with this sort of thing.) Anyway, it was just $100, so I figured I'd go for it. The plastic one for the KA never worked for me, but this one would have some "oomph" behind it.

Fred

fpatton's picture
fpatton

Nonna, I realize we didn't really answer your primary question which was, what accounts for the price difference? I have to say it's likely the difference between "Made in the USA" and "Made in China". The Uniworld is made in China. (Mine actually came as a "Sybo". Apparently, that's the factory's name. The importer is local, and I got it through them rather than waiting for the one with a Uniworld label to come up from LA.) I just couldn't justify the extra cost for even a used Hobart, given how relatively little I will use it compared to a pro bakery.

Pictures will be coming soon, but the Uniworld (sorry, "Sybo") 20qt is now installed in my kitchen. I have not put any dough in it, but just giving it a quick spin, I'm sure it will be able to handle anything I throw at it, which concerned me about the 10qt. However, it is big. Don't get one thinking you're going to put it on your counter. I put the bowl next to my KA5, and the top of the bowl was even with the KA's chrome trim ring. I had to borrow a neighbor's lift cart to put it on its new stainless steel work table. I don't think it's as heavy as the spec says, but we estimated it around 150-175 lbs. And even though the work table is reinforced, the mixer rocks around quite a bit at high speed. I'm going to have to look into further reinforcement. I do have it bolted to the table.

I'm also persuaded that even with the 20qt bowl, I won't have a problem with small amounts of dough. The dough hook is clearly well-designed. We'll see if the 12qt bowl turns out to be a good investment. I wasn't able to get a dough hook for that, but the paddle and whisk are coming. They may end up back on the auction site...

Fred

fpatton's picture
fpatton

Home at last!

The bowl is HUGE!

On the lift, waiting to go up.

The power switch/gear shift side:

Marks for drilling the mounting holes.

And finally, with its little brother! Note the meat grinder on the lower shelf.

Fred

thomaschacon75's picture
thomaschacon75

You'll love it.

Mind if I ask how much you paid? I paid $1375 + 400 shipping. I wish I would have had a local distributor. I had to order mine from Nova Scotia. ;D

Tip on cleaning the bowl, which can be a challenge: Fill it with water, add liquid dishwasher detergent (not dish soap) and leave it to soak overnight. Dishwasher detergent is so strong that, by morning, it's cleaned itself. You just have to pour out the water and rinse.

fpatton's picture
fpatton

Don't have the receipt in front of me, but I think it was $975. I assume it was lower because the importer is local, and it didn't go through Uniworld (still had the Sybo label on it). Downside is that warranty is only 1 year parts rather than parts and labor, but my supply house offered 60 days labor on top of that.

Thanks for the tip on bowl cleaning. Sounds like a very good idea.

It sure is quiet.  I'll be doing my first dough with it tonight.

Fred

fpatton's picture
fpatton

I've now been through a couple of batches of dough with the 20qt. It's fantastic! Both batches were in the 3lb range (Peter Reinhart's sourdough from the BBA), but the massive dough hook had no difficulty dealing with the relatively small amount. As luck would have it, the bowl fits just fine in my sink.

I'm going to give the paddle a try tomorrow with some cookies. I've already offered the KA to my sister. Won't be needing it anymore!

Fred