The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Lovely taste but where's that smell??

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marlnock's picture
marlnock

Lovely taste but where's that smell??

Hi all, i've been baking on and off for about 2 months now and am really enjoying many of the recipes on this site.  I've mostly been making sourdoughs, ciabattas and my own everyday bread loaf i made up. 


The taste of the bread is great but my question is, Where's the smell?


You know the one I mean, that smell of freshly baked bread that you might remember from your Grandma's or from the local bakery.  For some reason my bread doesn't seem to want to give up a smell.


Any ideas?

daughterofbaker's picture
daughterofbaker

You may want to take a look at the Farine blog where MC posts an article by Bob Lowe about the development of aroma in bread. He is a micro-biologist and gives a very thorough explanation.

Brot Backer's picture
Brot Backer

Try walking out of the house take a few deep breaths, or even a whiff of coffee beans, and walk back inside. Half the time you don't smell something it's because it formed gradually and you tuned it out.

wassisname's picture
wassisname

I don't really notice the smell much anymore either.  Partly, I think it depends on the bread.  Something with sweetner and/or dairy will be pretty noticable, but leaner, sourdough breads not so much.


I agree with Brot Backer, a little fresh air helps, but I've mostly resigned myself to the vicarious pleasure of listening to the deep breath and long, "aahhhhh" of other people when they first walk into the house on baking day.  I've noticed a similar effect with most things I cook - except when it's time to make hot sauce, that still just about knocks me over every time!


Marcus

midwest baker's picture
midwest baker

With age, our taste buds and noses start to lose it. Sad, but true. Kids have a great sense of taste and smell. That's why they're so picky.

marlnock's picture
marlnock

Thanks guys- i might try some of the more complicated breads with butter and the like and see what happens.  Looking at the article that daughterofbaker posted, it could be that sourdough simply won't get that much of a 'bread' smell because of the bacteria

rodentraiser's picture
rodentraiser

 I don't know about baking bread, but one day I was trying to get a sourdough starter going and I also had two poolishes out and had two doughs rising (with poolishes in them). I stepped out for a moment and when I stepped back in, it was as if I were making wine in my kitchen. It smelled so good.