The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Super Hydration + Scalding Heaven

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Super Hydration + Scalding Heaven

As a follow up to my last post on super hydrated dough, I have been making a loaf every day now for 3 days. My first batch had 10% dark rye and my daughter thought it was uncommonly delicious. That's a big statement from a 17 yo daughter.

Day 2 brought a batch with only 5% rye and a less intense bake in the  early stage. The loaf was lighter in color and still delicious.

Today, I made a double batch and stayed with 5% rye which I scalded and cooked for 1.5 hours. After cooling to RT, I incorporated the rye and went to an autolyse period of 20 minutes. At that time I added the salt and yeast and folded for a dozen or so times to incorporate the salt. There was quite a difference in the way the dough felt and handled after delaying the salt for 20 minutes.

The flavor is quite unique. The nutty after tones are still there and it seems just a little sweet and wholesome. I don't think that is a very good description let me think about it and  talk to my testers.

Sorry I don't have an image to show at the moment. I'll try to get one up when my camera returns.

Eric

Comments

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Eric,

Let me guess; your camera is "on loan"?   In demand elsewhere in the family??

I've still managed to pick up on your current mission.

Not really thinking about the latter version with the cooked flour, but your other techniques seem to pull you back to Professor Calvel again.   No starters; just straight dough with truly long fermentation.

One for my Level 3 students to get their heads round methinks.

Great work as ever; thank you

Andy

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I get caught up in how good the flavor of sourdough is. I sometimes go Months without doing a yeasted bread. Every now and then I need to remind myself that I can still make really great bread using a small amount of yeast and cool dough. It doesn't really take much longer and certainly not over night to do this procedure. The results are amazing no matter what additions you use. In my humble opinion, every student should be proficient with this procedure as a base level of baking.

Eric

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Andy,

My wife is a painter and painted a park bench as a commission from a local arts foundation. Today was the auction where all of the artists had their works sold to the highest bidder. She wanted to take good photos of some of the other artists.

She was very pleased that her bench drew the 3rd highest amount out of 40 artists in a town that knows good art. You never know with these things. Mary was pleased.

Cheers,

Eric

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Can't wait to see your scalded version. I need a hard-core close-up image of the crumb :P.

khalid

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I'm sorry to say, the bread was gone before I had a chance to take the class picture.

My final thought about this trial is that the 10% rye was a better flavor. I really enjoy the fact that I can get the idea to make fresh bread this morning and have it for dinner that evening. And, it's not a compromise in flavor at all. There isn't any secret in the dark rye I don't think. Any rye is fine I think.

I just wanted to say khalid that your breads have come a long way over the last few Months. You are a serious student of the craft.

Eric

ananda's picture
ananda

That is exactly what I had in mind Eric.

My aim is for the students to be able to make a dough first thing in the morning practical at 0900, and take a few slices with them as they go for lunch at 1300.

This should just about equate with your ideas as written here, yes?

4 hours though...this is my idea of a "genuine" quick bread...made the real way!

BW

Andy

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Hehe, thanks Eric, iam Serious, my wife and kids are now dependant on my loaves, no more commercial bread. You, and others in TFL deserve much credit.

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Eric, could you point me to the earlier thread on this scalding method?

Ron

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Ron,

There have been several threads about scalding rye to bring out the sugars. The best way for me to send you to a place where you can get caught up on the process is by asking you to search under "scalding rye" in the search feature. There are some good threads and a reference to a bread from Dan Lepards latest book. The bread is Black Pepper Rye and calls for scalding the rye. It is a terrific bread and there is a lot written about it. I hope that points you in the right direction. I hope you give it a try, it is a great procedure that delivers a unique flavor.

Eric

RonRay's picture
RonRay

Thanks, Eric-

I had a brick on DL's Sour 100% Rye Bread in HML, which used the gelatinized rye, as well.
I'll search, as you've suggested, thanks again.

Ron

 

ehanner's picture
ehanner

When you add hot water to rye flour, you should plan to use at least 200% to 300% of the flour weight in water. You don't need to actually boil the mixture. Just bring the water to 180F and mix it in the flour. Check out the black pepper rye recipe I posted on. That will show you what to do and the bread is outstanding.

Eric