The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Bruschetta

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teketeke's picture
teketeke

Bruschetta

 I found this recipe on Cookpad. ( Japanese)  It is very good to eat this in summer using juicy fresh tomatoes, fravorful fresh basil with your own baguettes. I love it without doubt. This recipe was posted by suru-zen. Thank you, suru-zen!!


 My favorite's Bruschetta recipe:




Ingredients  



*Large fresh tomatoes ( Peeled and diced)

2

*Basil

6-7 leaves

*Garlic (grounded)

1 clove

*Olive oil

4Tbsp

*Parmesan cheese

2Tbsp

*Salt

2 pinch

*Freshly grounded black pepper

1-2 tsp

French bread ( sliced and toasted)

 1  baguette

Cream cheese

As much as you want

1. Put * all ingredients in a medium bowl and mix lightly and refrigerate it

for 1 hour.

2. spread some cream cheese on the french bread and put some * tomato mixture on them.

Sprinkle parmesan cheese a little bit  and ready to serve.

Thanks to SylviaH & Sagharbormo, I could have another delicious version of bruschetta. I cut the baguettes lengthlwise and pulled  some soft crumb out and broiled them until golden brown. After that, squeezed 1/2 ripen fresh tomato in the crumb,  spread some cream chease over on it, and put  my *ingredients on, and sprinkle some olive oil and parmesan cheese ( I like cheese :))    It tated very good.  Thank you, folks!

 

Comments

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Your toppings look so delicious!  I broil the tops of my bread slices or grill with butter in an iron pan.  So delicious and refreshing on a hot summer day.


Sylvia

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Hi, Sylvia :)


Thank you for your reply and compliment :) I will try your idea next time!!


Best wishes,


teketeke

wassisname's picture
wassisname

That looks sooo good!  I'd forgotten all about bruschetta, even whith loads of tomatoes in the garden.  So, I went and picked up a baguette ("demi" - didn't want to overdo it =)) but then... I spotted a couple of really hungry-looking hitchhikers on the way home.  I looked at them.  I looked at my baguette.  I looked back at them - and handed over the baguette.  They were pretty happy.  Easy come, easy go.  I can always have bruschetta tomorrow.


Marcus

teketeke's picture
teketeke

I wish I were one of the hitchhikers!  What a generous you are! 


I like the way of you talk, I can see that you know how to enjoy your life. :)


And, I have a question! What does ("demi" - didn't want to overdo it =)) mean?


I don't know " demi" honestly.   Anyway, I will make another baguettes tomorrow. :) which means I can always have bruschetta tomorrow too!  


I will try to make whole-grain breads like you soon :P 


teketeke

wassisname's picture
wassisname

It's just the smaller baguette they make - about half the length of the standard baguette.

teketeke's picture
teketeke

I was looking up the word using google search, then that I saw was Dimi Moore or some girls faces showed up. Thank you for your help. Now, I know :)


Happy baking,


teketeke

sagharbormo's picture
sagharbormo

Your bruschetta do look lovely. The addition of cream cheese is novel, but it sounds good. I've been using a sinful amount of Marscapone lately & perhaps it is on a higher order in heaven than sour crea; maybe with the Seraphin; cream cheese with the Powers.


I had a knockout of a similiar offering of an amazing simplicity that was only matched by its deliciousness. A Zen version. A baguette is cut lengthlwise and much of the soft bread pulled out. With a very ripe tomato just moments before it starts to descend into its demise and collaspe, cut in 1/2 and smear one side with the tomato slowly squeezing out its juice along it length. Then the other side with other half of tomato. Depending on size of baguette and tomato, you can use another tomato.


Very lightly sprinkle with small grained sea salt and fresh pepper. Drizzle with exta virgin olive oil. I like the French olive oil from Provencal, but the Greek calamata olive oil is great too Palestinian olive oil is out of this world, but hard to obtain as each year more of the Palestinian olives groves are bulldozed by the occupation authorties and more water diverted to the settlements. In addition, the recent separation or aparthied (depending which side of the wall you reside) wall has made many fields and orchards inacessible to dozens of villages the wall bisects.The NY Times, in a blind tasting found Goya olive oil the hands down favorite--and so much cheaper than all those boutique brands offered by Williams & Sonoma. 


 I found this snack the immaculate consumtion into heaven. --mo

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Thank you for your wonderful comment.


I think that Marscapone tastes better on the bruschetta. I can't find Marscapone around my area unfortunately. 


I really want to eat the zen version's. It makes my mouth water :) as if I am watching a famous French(or Italian) cuisine show.  And, Thank you for the information about olive oil.  I feel like I can smell them now.   I like Goya brand and it is not only cheap but also tastes good.


Regards,


teketeke 

jyslouey's picture
jyslouey

I also like to use n a bit of fresh mint and black olives when I make my bruschetta.  I cna have inexpensive cherry tomatoes which makes the chopping eaiser.   Which reminds me it's time for me to make some of this to go with my breads, if only I can turn out some good bread this weekend.


Judy

teketeke's picture
teketeke

Using fresh mint, black olives, and cherry tomatoes sound very good! I will try it next time. Thank you, Judy:)


Best wishes,


teketeke

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

Near St Stephen's Green in Dublin, in a small alleyway behind the hotel, we found an Italian restaurant ...except that the chef added an Irish flair to everything.  They had bruschetta that was prepared on lightly toasted Irish brown bread ...and it was outstanding!  I'd have never guessed that it would have been, but it was!


Brian


 

teketeke's picture
teketeke

I looked up "Irish brown bread" on Google search that I always do when I don't know.


Is it the bread that you are talking about?



That is interesting! My husband is Irish although he was born in America and he never been Ireland. He likes any kind of Irish food. I better try that.:) Thank you, Brian.

chetc's picture
chetc

Not to hijack this thread, but if anyone has ever heard of the Pittston Tomato Fetival in Pittston PA, that is going on this weekend, but they had some good bruschetta's there too along with other Italian foods.


 


 


   Chet