The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Can I use aluminum covered baking pan to bake recipes calling for 500 degree oven?

  • Pin It
ginnyj's picture
ginnyj

Can I use aluminum covered baking pan to bake recipes calling for 500 degree oven?

I picked up at a garage sale, a  large aluminum, baking pan and lid with the label "Household Institute" on the bottom.  I see it's an oldie but a goodie.  Would it be ok to use for the recipes that call for putting the pan in a 450+ degree oven to preheat and then placing the bread in the pan?


I don't have anything else that would work, expect possibly a covered pyrex bowl, and do not want to buy something new for $50+++ dollars.  I don't do a lot of bread baking.


 


Thanks,


Ginny

deblacksmith's picture
deblacksmith

Aluminum is good to greater than 900F (Melting at 1100 F) so why not.  Has been used for many years in commerical kitchens.


Note I worked for Alcoa, Inc. for 32 years and they pay my pension.


Dave Smucker

breadinquito's picture
breadinquito

Hi...course you can: I always bake my loaves in aluminum disposable pans...I put the loaf in one of them and then sprinkle with some drops of water the one I put on the top...after 20 minutes I take out the pan on the top and keep baking another 20 minutes. In my case it works better than trying getting a steamy oven with a pan of hot water boiling in it! Try and let me know...........Cheers and happy baking from Quito. Paolo

earth3rd's picture
earth3rd

Wikipedia states on "aluminum" that it melts at 1220.58F. so 500F should be good to go.

ginnyj's picture
ginnyj

Thanks guys!!


I guess I have no excuse now not to try one of the many recipes that call for that very hot oven!


Ginny


 


 

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

it's not coated with anything inside.  


You didn't state that there was any coating, but I keep picturing my mom's old aluminium baking pans.  My mother was fond of aluminum baking pans coated with teflon.  That should never be heated beyond 350 degrees or so.  The fumes from over=heated teflon (and similar non-stick products) are toxic.