The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sacaduros

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Avie93309's picture
Avie93309

Sacaduros

New at this baking. I do love this recipe. I can not really tell the difference between the Kosher Salt and the Fleur de Sel. However, I'm going to try the Irish Butter and see if that will. Sacaduros

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kdwnnc's picture
kdwnnc

I have been tempted to try that recipe, but have not gotten to it yet.  Yours look great!!!

Avie93309's picture
Avie93309

Thank you! This has been a hit with all my co-workers. It's so addicting, once you've tasted your first Sacaduros, the memory of that first bite will haunt you...if only it's not so labor intensive.

whiskers's picture
whiskers

They look very yummy!! I would love to see the recipe or find a source of the recipe....

Avie93309's picture
Avie93309

Whiskers - these are very yummy bread indeed. I apologize for the delayed response. I have been sooo busy. But you won't regret trying this. I make this as a gift to others, as it's not available at the store unlike other popular Artisan Breads. It's just time-consuming. I also made it with Italian Sea Salt flavoured with Black Truffles.


It's on page 315 of The Bread Bible by Rose Beranbaum. I also copy-pasted the recipe of the Basice Hearth Bread from her website.


3/4 recipe Basic Hearth Bread (about 1 pound)


Flour for the shaped buns (about 3 cups)


Butter and Fleur de sel (14 x 1/2 inch cubes; a pinch of salt)


1. Divide the dough. One at a time, pinch off 2 Tbsp/1 oz. pieces of dough, keeping remaining dough covered. Shape each into a ball.


2. Prepare the flour bed. Fill a 13x9 baking pan about 1/2" deep with flour.


3. Preheat oven to 475 F 45 mins. before baking time. Have an oven shelf at the lowest level and place a baking stone or sheet on it and a cast iron skillet or sheet pan on the floor of the oven, b4 preheating ( for steam later)


4. Fill and shape the bun. Working with one piece of dough at a time, on a lightly floured counter, gently flatten the dough into a 2" disk. Place a cube of butter and a pinch of fleur de sel in the center. Gently but firmly pull 2 opposite edges of the dough, fold them over the center of the filling, and press down in the center just enough to seal the dough. The object is to seal the folded over dough as you complete the shaping, but not to seal it so securely as to prevent it from opening up during baking. Pull the two other sides of the dough out and fold them over in the center, pressing as before to secure the dough. Reperat the process one more time, for a total of 6 pulls (3x); for the last 2 pulls, take only little pinches of dough. Turn the roll upside down and set in the flour pan. Continue with the others.


5. Bake the buns. Lift each ball of dough out of the flour bed and, without dusting it off, set it flour side up on the prepared baking pan. Quickly but gently set the pan on the hot baking stone or sheet. Toss 1/2 c. of ice cubes into the pan beneath and shut the door. Bake for 5 minutes. Lower the heat to 400F and continue baking for 10-15 mins.


6. Cool the buns.


Basic Hearth is below.


Rose’s Basic Hearth Bread Adapted from Rose Levy Beranbaum, The Bread Bible, W. W. Norton & Company, 2003 This is the recipe as it appears on the back of the flour bag but with a few additions, variations and lots of tips! (Note: to print the out, select the text and copy into a word document) Makes: About 1 3/4 pounds of dough: An 8 inch round loaf, or a 9 inch sandwich loaf, or 16 dinner rolls, or 12 hot dog buns, or 8 hamburger buns



  • 3 cups/1 pound Harvest King flour (measured by dip and sweep)

  • 1/4 cup/1.25 ounce whole wheat flour

  • 1-1/4 teaspoons rapid rise, bread machine or other instant yeast

  • 1-1/2 teaspoons fine sea salt

  • 1-1/3 cups/11.25 ounces room temperature water

  • 1 teaspoon mild honey, such as clover

five by five's picture
five by five

Sorry to dredge up an old post, BBL's instructions confuse me a bit when they say to use the basic hearth bread recipe. Do i let the dough go through a first rise but not a second? The recipe says rise time: 0 minutes, but I didn't know if this was just after shaping. Thanks!

roselevyberanbaum's picture
roselevyberanbaum

new to baking? oh my! these are the hardest breads to shape in the book. bravo! i'm sure you've gone on to many more successes.

great photo!

roselevyberanbaum's picture
roselevyberanbaum

new to baking? oh my! these are the hardest breads to shape in the book. bravo! i'm sure you've gone on to many more successes.

great photo!