The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

90% Rye Sourdough from "Bread" by Hamelman

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Sedlmaierin's picture
Sedlmaierin

90% Rye Sourdough from "Bread" by Hamelman

Ok, here I go again. I did try to take a few more pictures-semi succesfully.


 


Info about the actual bake and ingredients:


-I used Arrowhead Mills Organic whole rye flour and KA Bread Flour;no medium rye flour at all


-the freshening was done using my "old bread" rye starter-freshened with old bread,too


-I did not add the optional yeast


- the freshening fermented in my oven with pilot light on for 6 hours;basic sour on countertop for 24 hours(i figure the temp was around 68-70 degrees); full sour ripened for 3 hours in pilot lit oven


-bulk fermentation about 20 minutes; final fermentation about an hour, shaped into two loaves, fermenting on parchment paper


-painted the loaves with water, docked them and put them in the pre-heated oven on a baking stone with steam for 10 minutes at 490 and then 50 minutes at 410. i let them sit in the turned off oven for about 10 minutes.


-they rested for 36 hours before I cut into them


The taste of this bread  transports me back to my childhood-it is just like the bread I grew up on! This is the first time I feel that my bread actually tastes sour-which to me is a good thing! I mean it is very yummy-moist crumb, nice chewy crust, just the right density.I am very, very happy! The major thing I would do differently next time is to let the final fermentation occur in a brotform or lined/floured bowl-it might help the dough from spreading too much.


this is the fermented basic sour


full sour at mixing


full sour after it was fully fermented-I had to stir it down once during fermentation  because it rose too much(others might say because I put it into a too small bowl.......a small distinction ;p)


tadaaaaa, bread!


crumbiest, crumb shot


Comments

jeremiahwasabullfrog's picture
jeremiahwasabullfrog

nice one.


I think near 100% rye is something that not many people tackle, far less understand, but it is so worth it!


I like to toast it quite crispy, and spread it with a sundried tomato pesto - hard to beat!

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Nicely done, Christine.  The Arrowhead rye is a very nice rye and your bread looks wonderful.


Even better that it takes you back home in your memories.

Doc Tracy's picture
Doc Tracy

I was just looking at that formula and wondering if such a short rise time was doable when omitting the commercial yeast. Seems to have worked well for your bread. I'll have to give it a try as soon as my new batch of rye flour comes in.

Sedlmaierin's picture
Sedlmaierin

You know, Tracy, I have come to realize with my current starter that I actually have to be really ,really careful not to overproof. I keep forgetting that fermentation speeds up as it goes along and the final proof is always really time sensitive. So, yeah, if you have a vigorous starter it is definitely possible and I think the final proof needs to be watched over carefully!


happy baking and am looking forward to your bake of this bread!


Christina

Doc Tracy's picture
Doc Tracy

And looking at your lovely loaves. I've become addicted to these high percent ryes! Mine this time had to be part spelt (about 25%) but still tastes very sour and strong, very similar to my last 100% rye.


My rye was fermented for 10 hours on the final proof, until the dough doubled! I'm so surprised that yours doesn't come out as dense as a brick from such a short fermentation. When I looked at the optional yeast I wondered if rise time needed to be adjusted and apparently it didn't.


I've been wanting to try the Hamelman's volkonbrot with flax. Have you tried this yet?

wally's picture
wally

Beautiful looking!


Larry

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

how I'm going to time this Hamelman recipe.  Your loaves?  Spitze!  :)

Sedlmaierin's picture
Sedlmaierin

Mini, die schmecken echt SUPER! Wie das Pfister Spezial vom Hofpfister! Thanks for your comment! I am currently working on round #2 of the poolish baguettes.I am re-doing it since the description just seemed like I might prefer the poolish over the biga baguette,taking into account that I am not much of a white bread person(well, lets amend that to say, I could conceivably eat Hamelman's Ciabatta EVERY SINGLE DAY of my life....I might have to take more dance classes then ;p)


Ich hoffe es geht Dir gut,liebe Mini.


Schoene Gruesse aus dem sonnigen Chicago,


Christina


P.S.: Only niceties exchanged in German ;p

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

Darn Deutchlanders... I wish I paid closer attention when my german mother was trying to teach us kiddies german ...


Brian


 

Sedlmaierin's picture
Sedlmaierin

LOL, Brian!


C

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

You might have picked up on some basic skills thru her.  You just have to take it to another level.


Christina has a good background in Both.  Some words are just hard to translate and that is why everyone should know a second language, even more so if you want to understand a culture or someone you love.  Love is a great motivator.  Being understood also.  Love of bread, also a good reason.


Learning a second language when young is the easiest way to set up the brain to learn later on when needed.  Both my son's grandmothers had feared they wouldn't be able to communicate with my son so they did their best when around him whether he knew it or not.  Gave me an interesting window of opportunity to observe them and how they both taught basic language skills with words, songs, rhymes, games.  Variations of toe and finger games.  (I got to choose from both cultures which rituals I liked.)


These can come back to you in little pieces when you start to learn or hear a language.  When my American grandfather heard my son speaking German with his Austrian Grandmother at my cousin's Minnesota wedding festivities, he suddenly recalled nursery rhymes and songs learned 85yrs before from his German mother and Grandmothers! He wasn't sure of all the words, but he took the oportunity to clear up any fuzzy sentence structure and words.  My son and MIL were helping.  It was so 4th generation cute!  My son was also multitasking, translating any English slang for his grandmother so she understood the conversations around her.  Multi-culti experiences can be so fun and educational.


Go for it, it's never too late!  Did you want some translations? 


Mini

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

Yes, german does come back in bits and pieces now and then (learning from EGADS!!! forty years ago).  I can often get the gist of things, but certainly can't do much more than that.  My 17 year old son is now in his FOURTH year of german and loves it.  My wife speaks german fairly fluently, but since her family emigrated to Canada while she was yet 10 years old, people have critized her for speaking "childish german", whatever that means.  Still, I agree, it's good to keep your brain alive and learn 2nd and 3rd languages (like the rest of the world does).  We're going to France, Germany, Switzerland, and Austria for our 10th anniversary (she's my 2nd wife ...got a good one this time.)  Planning on spending the better part of a month over there ...if the volcano quits by then (It's OK ...gotta a couple of years to go!)


Brian