The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Norwegian breads

  • Pin It
manicbovine's picture
manicbovine

Norwegian breads

I lived for awhile in Norway and had some things there that I have been completely unable to find outside of Norway. Norwegians make excellent bread -- the very best bread per my tastes. Many Norwegians complain about the quality of breads in other countries (I witnessed this even while travelling with Norwegians in Denmark and Sweden). Norwegian breads are typically very coarse, dense, and strongly flavored. After returning to the States, absolutely everything I've had seems as light and flavorless as white bread. (Incidentally, Norwegians also eat massive quantities of bread. I regularly watched my lunch companions eat a loaf of buttered bread for lunch, sometimes with small bits of cheese or meat for garnish.) 


The first thing I cannot find is a Spelt bread. My supermarket sold it as "100% Gastro Spelt bread". It was a dense loaf of spelt bread coated in sunflower seeds. The texture was similar to a Danish or German vollkornbrot, but with a more open crumb and a good toothsome crust. I ate it sliced as sandwich bread.  Can anyone point me in the right direction on this bread? (The Norwegian grocery chain ICA makes a good version of this bread.)


The second is actually what I'll call "Norewegian vollkornbrod". The Norwegian vollkornbrod, frequently called "Danish rye" in Norway, are much denser and coarser than their Scandinavian counterparts. The Norwegian version seems to consist of nothing more than very coarsely ground rye berries and some sort of sourdough starter. I've had "vollkornbrod" in Germany, Denmark, and Sweden, but none were the same as the Norwegian version. I joked with my Norwegian friends that Norwegians make better Danish rye bread than Danes. Does anyone know what I'm talking about, and can anyone point me toward a formula? The brand "Euro shopper" actually sold a good version that was simply labelled "rye bread".


I started baking regularly at home with the specific intent of building these Norwegian breads myself. I think I have enough experience to tackle some more complicated whole grain loaves.


Also, we had these great bread bags in Norway. They had tiny holes all over the bag that allowed the loaf to breath perfectly. Has anyone come across these in the US?


I just now started searching for these breads on the Norwegian sites, but I thought I'd cheat and ask here. I'll post an update if I find anything.


 


 


 

poppyfields's picture
poppyfields

but I'll be watching this thread for more information.  I'd love to learn more about Norwegian bread.

jannrn's picture
jannrn

I'm sorry...I gave you the wrong link above....the one below is correct! SO SORRY!!


www.webstaurantstore.com


Hope it helps!!!

rhomp2002's picture
rhomp2002

I wish they had this product in packs of about 200.   !500 is a whole lot of bags!!  Seems as if that would be about 5 years worth to me at least.


 


http://www.webstaurantstore.com/plastic-bread-bag-10-x-16-with-micro-perforations-1500-cs/130PPF1016M%201500.html


 


Are there produce bags that have perforations?  I have seen some that seem to have perforations on one side packaging grape and you can rinse them in the bag.  That might work for bread as well althoug I would really rather have Kraft paper bags with perforations..


 


 


 

Nickisafoodie's picture
Nickisafoodie

Please update your post if you find the recipies, I am seeking similar style breads!!

Zeb's picture
Zeb

Nils on ye olde breade blogge has some fabulous vollkorn bread recipes including his current one which is for a dinkelvollkorn bread.... http://theinversecook.wordpress.com/2010/03/22/dinkelvollkornbrot/  I hope that's ok to put the link here to his blog. 


 


I have made his saftig kerniges roggenbrot, which is very grainful and very very good and his Guiness one and can really recommend his formulae! 




I have a friend with Norwegian connections and I will ask them if they have any family recipes too


cheers Zeb

Doc Tracy's picture
Doc Tracy

I will be following this thread as I'm also trying to learn about the breads of this region. I love the dense ryes and seed breads, spelts. My mother is Finnish and my grandmother used to live with us for a short time, baking her wonderful breads for us.


My good friend in TX lived in Denmark for about 13 years and just last week he remarked on how he misses the heavy rye and seeded breads that are a meal in their own. He also spent some time in Norway. I'm going to bake him some Mini's favorite rye and perhaps give a go at a spelt or seeded variety and try shipping it back to Texas as a present to he and his wife.

rhomp2002's picture
rhomp2002

I looked for inversecook and came up with this URL:


http://theinversecook.wordpress.com/2008/01/09/vollkornbrot/


 


No idea why yours came up 2010/03/22.  I assume you got the URL from the website.  Very strange.  Anyway the URL above works.

Zeb's picture
Zeb

Whoops,


Hi Rhomp2002!


 


yes I did get the url from the website but you are quite right it gives a not found now. I don't understand why.   Sorry, but if you do want to see the spelt bread (dinkelvollkorn) it's a different one from the one you have linked to.


Anyway the recipe and Nils post  is there -  if you look in his recent posts about half way down the right hand side.  I just copied it again and it looks the same as what I posted, sorry about that.....  I love vollkornbrot.  The one I made above  has a salted sourdough starter and a very coarse rye soaker, and an old bread and seed soaker,  its very grainy, juicy and absolutely delicious.  It is in a post called saftig kerniges roggenbrot but the post itself is in English!


 I have learnt a huge amount about working with rye and grains from Nils, so imho it is well worth visiting his blog  and looking through his old posts.  I just tried to copy the url again, and they work in preview mode but not when it posts properly, sorry I have no idea why.


Zeb


 


manicbovine's picture
manicbovine

The photos of the dinkelvollkornbot look very similar to the spelt bread I was talking about. I just got a load of spelt flour, so I'll start this one tomorrow and go from there. Thanks!

badgerbaker's picture
badgerbaker

Have you looked at the baking books by Beatrice Ojakangas?  She has one specifically on Scandinavian breads.

manicbovine's picture
manicbovine

I had never seen that book, but I just now ordered it. Thank you. I'm particularly excited about trying the "Ale raisin bread", which I had completely forgotten about.


 

Rahneo's picture
Rahneo

Thanks for the lead to Ye Olde Breade Blog; this may be the bread I've been looking for!


Where can I purchase beet syrup?  Can you suggest any substitutions?


Best wishes!


 

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Beet syrup seems to be available to buy online in the US from a company called Au Marché and also direct from their store in Kansas - http://www.aumarche.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=store.prodDetail&prodID=49. Amazon stocks it currently in their Grocery department as do German Deli http://www.germandeli.com/4000412010808.html. It is reading up as being a German product so may also be available in specialist foodstores? Notes in another forum mention it sometimes being available at IKEA, which would make sense as they do stock a small range of Scandinavian and other foodstuffs.


Best of luck with the bread making. Do keep us posted!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

If you type "dense" into the site search box, you will come up with all kinds of recipes that made dense loaves much to the disappointment of the contributor.  It appears that making a dense loaf is so much easier than baking a fluffy one.   It wouldn't be hard to read through the problems and apply them to any recipe and come out with what you're looking for.


Other words to try:  compact loaf, heavy, brick, seeds, seedy, pumpernickel, vollkorn


Mini

Rahneo's picture
Rahneo

Thank you for your help!  I think I'll try this recipe and stumble along from there.


Rahneo

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

But to answer your Q on beet juice, it is the syrup from processing sugar beets for their sugar, much the same way molasses is from cane sugar.  Beet syrup is a heavy sweet syrup but very mild.   Golden syrup would be similar and so would just simple syrup.  I would dissolve yellow (beet) sugar, or light brown sugar which ever you prefer in some water, heated to make a syrup and use that. 


Mini

Zeb's picture
Zeb

Being english, we don't have beet syrup but I think I probably use molasses or any dark unrefined sugar syrup. Do you have such a thing, treacle, molasses, something of that sort. The hardest thing to get for these breads in England is the cracked rye, or coarsely ground rye which is what you need for the soakers very often. I get friends to bring them back from Germany. 


Mini I would agree that making a bad dense loaf is quite easy, but to make a good loaf showing clear aeration when you cut it,  out of a mix with a high proportion of seeds and grains and coarse flour is quite challenging.  There are many bakeries in England which sell 100 per cent rye bread, heavy, starchy and quite horrible. They don't have any understanding of how to preferment the rye and the grains and of how to create the traditional vollkorn style breads of Europe which when good have a spongey and almost bouncy texture. I don't know the Norwegian breads the original poster was looking for, so suggested Nils's work as a starting point in their search for great vollkornbrot!

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Zeb,


I don't know if this is the same product you are looking for or if it would be the same quality as that brought directly from Germany but the Watermill, Little Salkeld, near where I used to live in Cumbria, offers cracked rye in its online shop http://organicmill.co.uk/acatalog/bfm11.html. Forgive me if you know this already or have tried this product and found it unlike German rye, but they were pioneers of organic flours and grains in the UK and their products are normally good quality.


Regards, Daisy_A

Zeb's picture
Zeb

Hi Daisy,  I hadn't looked at Little Salkeld when I was looking for the rye, thanks for the tip! I have been there a few years ago - I have relations who live in Cumbria - it is a wonderful mill and I did buy flour there, and had a look around the mill and ate their lovely organic bread and cakes in their tearoom. 


 


I will look again at their catalogue. Many thanks.  Zeb

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Dear Zeb,


Glad you had a good time at Little Salkeld! Hope you find the grains you need.


Regards, Daisy_A

Rahneo's picture
Rahneo

Dear Zeb,


Thank you for your help!  I think you understand what I'm looking for.


R

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A


Not Norwegian I'm afraid but here are some links to recipes for sourdough rye breads with higher levels of whole grain and seeds than in many widely available recipes.


The first by Dan Leader has a minimal range of ingredients, similar to those described by manicbovine, with a relatively high proportion of cracked berries and cracked rye http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/cooking-live/vollkornbrot-recipe.


The second is a batch baked sourdough rye with treacle and beer.  Sourdough fermentation is by the reservation of dough method. http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A500482.


Regret I've not tried these recipes yet but after this discussion am tempted by the second.

 

manicbovine's picture
manicbovine

Thanks! That Dan Leader recipe looks like it may produce the results I'm after. I'll post here once I've tried it.

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Great! Hope it works out well and look forward to hearing more.

BakeryBits's picture
BakeryBits

My Norwegian aunt tells me that the Norwegian name for this bread is "Helbrød" (hel meaning whole, brød meaning bread). She gave me the following recipe which I have transalted but, I confess, have still to try (although it works in Norway!):


It makes quite a lot of dough, so you might want to scale it back a bit:


Ingredients:


500g Wheat grains (28%)


500g Wholemeal flour (28%)


500g Rye flour (28%)


750g Stong White Flour (44%)


35g salt (2%)


75g fresh yeast (4%)


1600g whole milk (91%) A little more to brush dough before baking


 


Method:


Mix all the dry ingredients. Stir the yeast into a little milk then add to the dry ingredients. Work the dough until sticky. Leave until doubled in size. Kneed well then divide into 4 pieces and form into individual loaves.


Put all loaves together into a buttered pan, adding a little butter between each for easier division after baking.


Allow to rest for a further 30 minutes.


Brush with milk and stick each loaf with a fork 4 times.


Bake in the lower par of the oven at 225DegC for about an hour.


 


Still meaning to try it - never seem to have 500g wheat grains to hand other than that which I give to the chickens...


 


Patrick