The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Publix 5 grain Italian bread

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Lindal010101's picture
Lindal010101

Publix 5 grain Italian bread

Have been experimenting with trying to make an Italian 5 grain bread similiar to Publix Bakery.  Has anyone ever tried and succeeded?


HELP!

flournwater's picture
flournwater

Never tried to duplicate that one but, considering a "slice" of bread weighs about 42 grams, and it appears that's what they base their reference to the bread's nutritional value on, my guess is they're using a flour with about 12% protein and fortifying their dough with about 2.5% fat and about 7% sugar.  Those figures should give you a place to start.

chefdann's picture
chefdann

the fat comes from the 5 grain mix.  The flour is the same flour as they use for their Italian sandwich bread, White Mountain, French bread, French burger buns, water rolls, and hoagies.  The real trick to that bread will be getting a wet enough grain mix that isn't femented.  The topping is a dry version of the wet grain mix.  The wet mix comes to them in a big bucket and the dry mix in a box.

Lindal010101's picture
Lindal010101

So being a new bread maker, what does that mean exactly?

chefdann's picture
chefdann

Well, it means you have to find a way to make the grains parcooked.  The mix at Publix has dextrose added to it, which makes it pretty darned sweet.  Almost like candy sweet.  What I would recommend is chosing your grains, add boiling water (ratio of cup to cup) to the grains and allow to steep, covered with plastic wrap.  Your final dough will need less water for the grains have added liquid.  I would avoid any added sugar.  Sugar makes the dough move faster and that takes away some of the brilliance of the crumb.  Add the grain mix to the start of your mixing.


 


Good luck.  Hope it works out well for you.

chefdann's picture
chefdann

Well, it means you have to find a way to make the grains parcooked.  The mix at Publix has dextrose added to it, which makes it pretty darned sweet.  Almost like candy sweet.  What I would recommend is chosing your grains, add boiling water (ratio of cup to cup) to the grains and allow to steep, covered with plastic wrap.  Your final dough will need less water for the grains have added liquid.  I would avoid any added sugar.  Sugar makes the dough move faster and that takes away some of the brilliance of the crumb.  Add the grain mix to the start of your mixing.


Good luck.  Hope it works out well for you.