The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

High Altitude Bread Baking

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kbk's picture
kbk

High Altitude Bread Baking

Hi


 


Im new to the site and have recently moved to a location at about 5200 feet (not Denver).  Looking for advice on bread making at high altitude.  I have discoverd that reducing yeast by about 33% seems to work.  Thanks for any advice.


 


KBK

maggiem's picture
maggiem

I live at almost 8000 ft and have no problems with my bread baking. The only thing I can say is it seems that it rises a bit faster. I don't make any adjustments and mostly bake with my sourdough starter.

kbk's picture
kbk

Thanks Maggiem -  Since you don't adjust yeast - do you stretch and fold during the first rise?


KBK

maggiem's picture
maggiem

Yes, I autolyse for 30-40 min then add salt, knead just a couple of minutes and do 1 or 2 stretch and folds during the first rise.

jabby's picture
jabby

I live in SLC at about 5000 feet and have not made any adjustments for altitude with my bread baking. I do autolyse (usually only longest for 30 minutes) and then proceed as usual. I do not think my bread rises faster than normal and really that seems to be  more a factor of temperature than altitude. I have a homemade proofing box that I use because my house was to cold and bread baking became a game of wait, wait, wait....... not anymore with proofing box. Good luck.

kbk's picture
kbk

Thanks again.  I'll try that approach.


kbk

naschol's picture
naschol

I also have not made any adjustments for high altitude.  I DO live in the Denver metro area.  I did have a bread machine for a while and noticed that I did have to cut the yeast a little.  But, for doing it the non-bread machine method, I just do it the same as low altitude folks.  I do notice it rises slightly faster.


Nancy

smasty's picture
smasty

I bake at 6000 feet, just south of Denver (suburb).  When I use yeast, everything rises too fast.  I think your 33% reduction sounds about right...I'd say 33-50%.  90% of my bakes are now w/ my own sourdough culture.  Our cultures (or mine at least) here in Denver aren't very sour--they taste much better retarding overnight.  When I use my own culture, I need to plan a 6-hour bulk ferment (nothing much happens for the first 4 hours).  I like to overhydrate just a tad (since it's so dry) and I love stretch and folds.  Also...I find my breads come out best at a 200-200.5 internal temp, instead of the 205 that most people shoot for.  I use a digital probe to get the internal temp. 


Sue