The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

So what might have happened exactly?

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arlo's picture
arlo

So what might have happened exactly?

Tonight I went ahead and started to bake my Whole Wheat Hearth Bread from WGB by Reinhart. I followed the recipe precisely, and had the biga and soaker ready when I came home from work that I prepared the night before. I added the final ingriedents, mixed well, kneaded, let rise till at least 1 1/2 times the original size (ended up being one hour as suggested in the formula) in my 4 Liter container with markings to get a near precise measurement to the best of my ability. Then went ahead, shaped it into a batard, dusted with flour and let rise for 40 minutes covered on my counter before I poked it. This is where I ran into issues. As I stated in my last blog my batard seemed to burst open at the score due to what I believe after help from (sorry can't remember your name) someone who pointed out it might be due to under proofing. So this time I wanted to make sure that wasn't going to happen. Since I did bake a loaf of Vermont Sourdough with Increased whole grain and the same issue happened two days ago; pale crust, extra large burst at the scoring.


So I searched for what 'should happen' when you poke a loaf when it is ready for baking. I came up with many different answers, mainly; The dough should spring back slowly, or the dough will not spring back...


I couldn't figure out what it should be, so I decieded to put it in the already heated oven since it appeared to be almost 1 1/2 times the size now. The oven was already at 500 degrees and the stone had been in there the whole time. I proceeded to carefully place the loaf on the stone, score it (I realized now I didn't do it deep enough or was it over proofed??) and threw some ice in the oven and squirted the bread twice. After twenty minutes I rotated the loaf, and to my surprise on the other side of the loaf low and behold, my two poke marks were still in the loaf...


Whole Wheat Hearth Batard


 


So...did I under proof, over proof and just fail all around : /


And here is a picture of the batard lengthwise to get a better visualization of the scoring if it helps any more.



Any thoughts on the matter? They'd be much appreciated! And tomorrow morning after I slice it and have some for breakfast I'll give some input on the crumb and taste.


 


Arlo

flournwater's picture
flournwater

The ear looks pretty good.  The evidence would suggest over proofed ...


Let's wait until we've examined the crumb to reach a verdict.

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

Those dents from your finger indicate that the dough was over-proofed... No biggy though.  Live and learn.  Bake it sooner next time.. Got any pix of the crumb?  Looks awesome otherwise!  Flour is cheap... Fun is cheap... Keep it up!


Brian


 

arlo's picture
arlo

Ah, overproofed this time eh? So does that mean when I do the poke test, it should spring back then?


Crumb pictures soon, I just had two slices for breakfast and they were pretty darn delicious! But I am off to work.

flournwater's picture
flournwater

Yes, it should "spring" back.  That's not the same as "snap" back.  Your indentation in the dough should respond by gently raising back toward the surface, but it shouldn't come up all the way.  That would mean underproofed.  It should raise back to about half the depth of the "poke" indentation.

arlo's picture
arlo

Thanks flournwater for the answer! I plan on baking my next loaf Wednesday (with some small pastry bakes in between) and I will use this advice and watch closely to what happens when I poke the loaf!


Here are some pictures of the crumb from the Whole Wheat Hearth bread by the way;


flournwater's picture
flournwater

Hey,  Arlo, it's been a month since your last post and we haven't yet seen how the next loaf turned out.  Haven't abandoned us have you?

di trep's picture
di trep

my inner oven glass has broken,I think it might be attribuable to pouring cold water in the pan for steam. Any advice?still trying to produce a rustic bread tasty AND with a light crumb.Love this blog!Merci

flournwater's picture
flournwater

You've posted on a forum, not a blog, so I'm not sure you meant to make your comment here.  Additionally, the posting is off topic so it's not likely to be viewed by anyone wishing to reply specifically to your post.


Cold water doesn't provide any more or any better steam than hot water.  If you avoid using cold water when pouring water into your pan for steam you'll have less chance of damaging your oven.

di trep's picture
di trep

so sorry for my error,thank you for the advice though.(I found what I needed in "Misc")

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

Make mistakes and lots of'm ...It helps you fit in with the rest of us!  No worries...


Brian