The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Gringes..."Ive got to admit it's getting better..."

  • Pin It
wally's picture
wally

Gringes..."Ive got to admit it's getting better..."

This past June marked the 42nd anniversary of the release of the Beatles seminal "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band," and with it, one of my favorite songs of the album, "Getting Better."


Today marked my umpteenth attempt at successfully scoring poolish baguettes, and to my utter joy a success at last!  So now I'm humming the tune in my head....over and over.



I did two bakings actually: My first mix this morning was for the baguettes with poolish, and I followed that up with another poolish-based rustic bread: Hamelman's Pain Rustique by way of James MacGuire and Raymond Calvel.  I love the fact that this no-knead, no-shape bread is ready to bake in just over two hours (not counting the overnight fermentation of the poolish).  What other bread can be created in such a short time with the distinctive nuttiness of the poolish-based dough?



As for the baguettes, I think I'm getting closer to the secret of getting my gringes to open consistently.  The biggest factor, I believe, has been the transition to a couche for final proofing.  And in particular, allowing the baguettes to rise seam-side up, as we did at King Arthur Flour.  Although I've repeatedly heard and read that allowing the dough to develop a "skin" will defeat successful scoring, my experience since using a couche has been that the up-side of the dough gains more surface tension, and it's been obvious to me in that my cuts are no longer dragging the dough, but (for the most part), cleanly cleaving it.



The second factor, I think, is a quick misting of the loaves just after scoring and before loading.  Finally, I've started consistently throwing 3-4 ice cubes into my cast iron skillet in the bottom of the stove about 1 minute before loading.  That's followed by a cup of boiling water onto the skillet once the bread is just in.  And then at 2 minute intervals I'm again misting the loaves very quickly - just twice.  So when I set the timer for 24 minutes, which with my gas stove is a full bake at about 460°, I'll mist at 22 minutes and then at 20.  After that I leave well enough alone.


Tomorrow I'm off to pick up a bag of lava rocks at David Synder's suggestion to see if I can successfully generate steam that lasts longer - as opposed to one scorching burst.


Anyhow, as the Beatles put it so well those many years ago: "Getting so much better all the time."


Larry


 


 

Comments

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Great looking loaves, Larry!


Sylvia

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

That can't be..I'm too young!! It's OK, I was only 13... :  )


The song is fitting though..you are getting better all the time!


Betty

DonD's picture
DonD

Nice grignes Larry. Also, Sgt Pepper's Lonely Heart's Club Band happens to be one of my all time favorite LP's. Boy, we are dating ourselves...


Don

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Your breads keep getting better looking Larry. Great looking loaves!


Eric

chouette22's picture
chouette22

in both of your loaves. Beautiful!

wally's picture
wally

Thanks everyone for your comments!  Yeah, it is hard to realize it's been 42 years since that album.  The good part is that we're all here to have the memories!


Larry

SumisuYoshi's picture
SumisuYoshi

Beatles and bread is quite the combination! I wasn't around when it, or any other of the albums came out, but still one of my favorite bands!


And those are some good looking loaves, definitely some nice scoring on the baguettes. Keep up the good work!


Noel

wally's picture
wally

Noel,


Thanks for the kind comments.  With the re-issue of their discography, you'll have the opportunity to experience what we did - though frankly the price is enough to keep me humming what I remember!


Larry

alannaturally's picture
alannaturally

You mentioned Lava Rocks to prolong steam.  I have never heard of that.  What is the theory behind it?


alannaturally


PS Great looking crumb on your loaf.


 


 


 


 

wally's picture
wally

Thanks for the comment!  My assumption (underlined) is that they promote steaming in two ways:


1- They're porous, so will absorb water


2- They create more surface area than the cast iron skillet I place them in.


Today I baked a sundried tomato and roasted garlic fougasse, and the color of the bread was the best I've achieved.  I simply poured one-and-a-half cups of water over the lava rocks after loading the bread.



Tomorrow I'll repeat the experiment, but this time I'll soak the lava rocks in water for an hour prior to loading them into the oven when I heat it (usually 45 minutes prior to bake time).  Then I'll pour the same amount of water over them when the load the bread.


We'll see if there's a difference.  The real test for me will come with baguettes and batards where it's important for the scoring to open allowing oven spring to achieve its maximum effect.


Larry

alannaturally's picture
alannaturally

Will be interested on how it turns out.  Having trouble with my oven thermostat right now so will have to try later.  


 


alannaturally