The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

John Boos Knead Board

Djehuty's picture
Djehuty

John Boos Knead Board

I've just acquired a John Boos Knead Board (which can be flipped over and used as an enormous cutting board).  I think I like it, but I'm not sure.  One thing I noticed immediately was that the dough seems to stick to it, and it's a bit of a pain to clean the dough and flour off.  The grain seems to hold flour.  I thought this wasn't supposed to be an issue with end-grain maple.  Did I get a defective board, or do I just need to adjust to it?

Any tips would be greatly appreciated.

 

prijicrw's picture
prijicrw

I would reccomend the LÄMPLIG Chopping board from Ikea. It's absoluty the biggest board I have seen in stores (18" X 21") and you can't beat the price at $9.99.

hsmum's picture
hsmum

Just a caution about this Ikea board.  Hopefully I simply got one that was defective, but mine split in two after I'd had it a couple of months.  It was only used as a cutting board, quickly washed and immediately wiped dry, and never fell to the floor or anything that could have weakened it.  However...at $10 for a wooden board, it's worth a try for sure.

Karen

Djehuty's picture
Djehuty

Hmm... When I tried scraping it, it didn't remove all of the flour and stuck-on dough.  I had to use a wet sponge to get that off, and even so I think I feel a residue.  It seems the dough and flour get into the minuscule holes in the grain.  Is that to be expected?  If so, how do I get the rest of the left-over gunk off the board?

I don't mind the "grabbing" effect, I'd just like it to let go at some point so I can clean it. :)

 

Djehuty's picture
Djehuty

The only way to keep it clean is to scrape so hard you risk tearing up the surface?

Yikes.  If I can't use this dough kneading board for kneading dough, what can I use?

 

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

I don't mean to insult, but you are using a bench scraper? This shouldn't be a big deal or problem, if so.

Betty

Djehuty's picture
Djehuty

There's nothing insulting in that, it's a reasonable question. :)  I have a bench scraper, yes.  When I scraped with it, a fair amount of dough and flour remained behind, stuck to the grain of the wood.  I could scrape harder, but I don't want the scraper to become a chisel, scratching the wood or peeling up curls of it as I go.

 

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

brand of cutting board. You shouldn't have to scrape hard ..period. I've used a number of wooden boards, not of Boos quality, and have never had a problem. I'm totally puzzled. Can you post a picture? What were you making?

Betty

Djehuty's picture
Djehuty

I was just making plain old French Bread.  A photo wouldn't do any good, unfortunately.  The board doesn't look any different now, but it feels different.  Not quite as smooth.  I think I was able to wash most of the dough and flour off, but it feels as if there's some left.

If scraping should remove most or all of the dough, how hard can one scrape these boards?  I've been known to break things which were supposed to be very sturdy, and I don't want to repeat the experience with this board.

 

summerbaker's picture
summerbaker

I have a Boos butcher block table which can be incredibly hard to clean after kneading - especially rye.  As Dan says, the scraper works well and IMO it is much more effective than scrubbing, however you must keep the board well oiled if you scrape it often.  Don't fall for advice that tells you to buy special wood oil, just get plain mineral oil from Wal-Mart (pharmacy section) and let it soak in overnight before wiping it off.  I do like the way that the wood "grabs" dough for loaves, especially drier doughs, but I don't use it for pastries or anything else delicate or really wet.  I have a 2'x3' piece of Corian for this which is nice and slick.  I'm too much of a clutzy beginner to be able to cope with the butcher block texture for anything that requires fine shaping like croissants, etc.  I just end up using too much flour.  Hope this helps.

Summer

Djehuty's picture
Djehuty

Sorry about the delay in responding.  I'm in the middle of preparing to move.

Thanks for the advice, everyone.  I guess I'll have to send the board back.  I'm not comfortable with a board that's this difficult to clean.  Dough may be a much safer food than, say, raw chicken, but if left around it'll still grow unpleasant microorganisms.  Scraping just doesn't do the trick -- if I scraped any harder than I did the last time I tried, I'd gouge the heck out of the board.  Given a choice between washing it and making it fall apart, or leaving it unwashed and risking my health, I'll just return the blasted thing.

Thank you all very much for your advice and remarks. :)