The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hamburger Buns

Debra Wink's picture
Debra Wink

Hamburger Buns

  

I made hamburger and hotdog buns over the weekend, and thought I'd share my results. I used a soft, enriched, whole wheat sandwich bread recipe that has milk, egg, oil and a little honey. The formula is fairly ordinary for soft, fluffy bread, but the baking pan deserves a mention, so I thought I would post about it here. I actually have a hamburger bun pan, even if it always seems to be my last choice. When I'm making a full batch of 12 buns, I reach for a half-sheet pan. It's the perfect size for the buns to grow into each other just a little and support each other in the oven.

But this time, I wanted to use half the dough for hotdog buns, so I got out the hamburger bun pan, which makes six at a time. Then I spied the muffin top pan that I added to my bakeware collection not too long ago. Surprisingly, the wells are exactly the same 3 1/2 inces in diameter as the bun pan. I like the shape better, and the pan has a non-stick finish with no seams for easier clean-up. So, I gave it a test run. I may never use the hamburger bun pan again. The muffin top pan is my pick for a small batch of burger buns :-)

   

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I can see why you preferred the muffin top pan. Nice hamburger buns too :-) .

Thanks for telling us about this neat pan.

--Pamela

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Exactly?

Mini

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I looked it up on KA. It's intended use appears to be for making shallow muffins--less muffin, more topping. KA's brand is bigger than Chicago Metallic (bigger holes).

--Pamela

Debra Wink's picture
Debra Wink
xaipete's picture
xaipete

Great video. Why do I feel like we were just sitting ducks waiting for you to post it?

:-)

--Pamela

Debra Wink's picture
Debra Wink

That was such a classic episode, I thought everyone knew what muffin tops were. So, when Mini asked, that's what sprang to mind. A quick google search on Seinfeld + muffin tops, or even just 'muffin tops,' and references to the show come right up. There's even a Wicki entry on it. The video didn't take long to find. Glad you enjoyed it :-)

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I really enjoyed it. It made my evening! Got anymore funny youtube stuff? Please send it my way.

--Pamela

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Funny.  Thanks.  So baking muffins tops with regular muffin pans can create problems?  A muffin top pan is a solution to the problems of too many stumps?  Cute.  I'm speachless. 

Mini

Thoughts:  Cake like cookies...  no bottom crust wanted (papers?)... grease and line pan with flavor... top rack.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

So smooth they look like eggs!  Beautiful!

I can see why the left pan works better.  The pans also provides more bottom surface area, so more bottom & side heat too.   I have the problem when the dough rolls or slips, or parchment buckles going into the oven and two or more stick together.  Especially in a small oven.  I do tend to over-crowd the pan.  Thanks for sharing.

Could the second pan, the deeper one, be a tart pan?  I've seen shallow tart papers about that size. 

Mini

Debra Wink's picture
Debra Wink

The size would be good for individual tarts, or crumbcakes even. KA sells crumbcake liners, but they're 4". These openings are 4" at the top, but only 3 1/2 across the bottom. And, the pan looks more steel than aluminum, so not sure about its baking qualities for pastries. Guess I'll cross that bridge if I ever get to it :-)

deblacksmith's picture
deblacksmith

I have the KAF Hamburger pan (made by Chicago Metallic) and like it very well.  In fact, I got a second one so I could make 12 buns at a time.  I have made many hamburger buns using dough with, milk (powder), butter, and dark brown sugar.  Makes great buns.  Then one day when making my Italian dough that I use for both pizza and bread I decided to try making hamburger buns with that too.  They turned out great and I now use both doughs.  My spouse prefers the Italian dough – I use about 75 grams for each bun.

 Dave

Debra Wink's picture
Debra Wink

I scaled these at 2 1/2 oz, which is pretty close to your 75 grams :-) This batch was 50/50 white and whole wheat---I'm working toward 100% whole grain.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Those pans do make perfect looking buns!  I saw the hamburger one when I was ordering my giant Texas size muffin pan.  My husband loves those big muffins.  I bet either of those pans would work nicely for tarts to as Mini suggested!

Sylvia

ehanner's picture
ehanner

That was funny Debra. Great Buns!

Eric

mkelly27's picture
mkelly27

Can you make muffin tops in the hamburger bun pan?  I too, was perplexed at the similar qualities of both pans.  Is there a chance they have them mixed up?

 

Debra Wink's picture
Debra Wink

But, the bun pan is twice the depth (1") of the muffin pan (1/2"). That's really the only difference on the dimensions. And the bun pan is a heavy steel-aluminum. I guess you could use the bun pans for tops, but they may be more like small cakes. I imagine they would probably have a thicker, tougher bottom crust because of the weight and type of metal. Don't know that for sure.

jannrn's picture
jannrn

Where is the picture of the hot dog buns?? I have made hamburger buns for years and never used a special pan. Guess I am lucky!! But I haven't had the courage to try the hot dog buns yet.....PLEASE post the picture of them too!!!

Thanks

Debra Wink's picture
Debra Wink

When I'm making a full batch, I use a half-sheet pan, because I like to bake them together all on one tray, one oven shelf. I don't think luck has anything to do with it---just selecting the pan from my arsenal that is best suited for the size job at hand. Isn't that what other bakers do ;-)

There's a link to the hotdog buns in my original post, but it may be hard to see. This should take you there:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/12517/hot-dog-bun-pan#comment-73002

The hotdog buns don't look as pretty, because the dough was bucky and they were hard to shape. But this was another case of improvising with a pan made for something else. As Alton Brown would say, there's room in the kitchen for only one uni-tasker. (And that would be the fire extinguisher.)

I didn't proof the hotdog buns long enough. The hamburger buns got extra time while the others were in the oven. See what a difference 20 minutes makes...

 

jannrn's picture
jannrn

Debra...thanks SO much for the link! THEY ARE BEAUTIFUL!! You used a cookie sheet for these?? As much as I love special pans, I agree with some who love things in the kitchen that multi task, plus the fact of just being able to put something to many uses!! I will try to make them for the 4th!! I am INSPIRED NOW!!!!

Thanks again!!

Debra Wink's picture
Debra Wink

Sorry, I wasn't clear in my previous post. Talking about hamburger and hot dog buns at the same time. You can read a little more about the pan that I used for the hot dog buns over on the other thread. Here is what it looks like:

I don't see why you couldn't use a 9x13 (2 rows of 4, or 6 down the middle), or a sheet pan, if you're doing a large batch. Someone, somewhere, once gave a tip to shape the dough into ropes the same size as hot dogs. And I think that might work well for brats and sausage too---try to match the ropes to the size of what will be going in them---and allow enough space for them to spread. Wider buns for fatter dogs, or dogs with lots of stuff on top. I crammed 7 into this 11 1/2-inch pan, but six would have been better. Hope that helps clear things up :-)

Big Brick House Bakery's picture
Big Brick House...

The Pan looks really close to my Biscotti Pan... what are the dimensions of yours?

Debra Wink's picture
Debra Wink

Thanks for the tip :-)  The pan is 11 1/2 inches long by approximately 6 inches wide. But the sides curve out from 4 inches across the bottom to 6 1/2 inches across the top opening. It's the Hearth Bread Pan (for rye breads).

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Debra.

Now that you posted the photo and mentioned that this was the pan KAF sold for rye breads, I realize that's the pan I bought, used once and stashed!

I found I didn't like it for rye breads, but now I will try it for rolls!

Thanks! 

I don't like spending money on stuff I never use.

David

Debra Wink's picture
Debra Wink

I did the same thing. They sold it as a loaf pan for two pounds of dough, but I found that wasn't enough to get a well-shaped loaf. I think 2 1/2 to 3 pounds is more realistic, but more dough was too heavy for the whole grain breads that I like to make, to rise evenly from top to bottom. I almost got rid of this pan during my last kitchen clean-out. And then I got cold feet and put it back in the cabinet. It really did work as a small-batch hot dog bun pan, so I guess it has earned its keep for now. If you like the New England style buns, I think it would work great for those too. And now biscotti! The possibilities may not be endless, but at least I've found at least one thing I can use it for :-)

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Could also be a rectangular flatbottomed wok?  I just bought a deep medium size (24cm) frying pan (more like a flat bottomed wok) with a nice bottom curve and removed the handle.  It's dark outside and non-stick inside perfect support for my high hydration "rye rounds."  The low hydration dough got so excited it went fluffy on me as I tried it out.  Finished loaf weighed 1320g or 2.9lbs.

Mini

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Mini.

I don't know that a rectangular pan is suitable for stir frying. Maybe shove frying. Japanese omelets? Hmmmm ... A "magic bowl" cover for a single demi-baguette!

David

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Might need a bigger pan but thanks for the idea!  I got the seaweed sheets for the maki-zushi.  Would they come out 1/2 size?  I'm running on your "bowl" idea, David.   Would it fit over a regular loaf pan as a "Magic box" to keep in steam?  What if one were to use just a bread pan on top of another bread pan to create a steam chamber?  One might need fancy paper clips to keep them together:

They just might work on some bread pans...   Introducing the new "bread clips" !!!

allysnina's picture
allysnina

thanks for the great tip on using a muffin top pan!!