The Fresh Loaf

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autolyse for bread machine

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LLM777's picture
LLM777

autolyse for bread machine

I have been trying an autolyse for my bread machine. (I am trying to find an everyday sandwich bread.) I grind my own wheat and for the moment, I still like the convenience of the bread machine because I can't seem to make it well by hand yet.  The texture of the bread seems to be doing better but it still is crumbly when you cut in the middle and falls apart for sandwiches.  I have tried following JMonkey's recipe and procedure for whole wheat sandwich bread and put it in the bread machine for kneading and then baked in oven and also, baked in the bread machine. Is there a way to make it less crumbly?  What ingredient or technique could improve the texture (besides doing it all by hand)? 


Thank you!

umstetter's picture
umstetter

I use my bread machine all the time for making whole wheat bread that is "foldable".


The only thing I do differently with 100% whole wheat (which I also grind myself) is for a 1.5lb loaf I add 1 Tbs "vital wheat gluten". You can either make this yourself or buy it in the aisle next to the specialty bread flours. My package cost me about $1.69 for 6.5 ozs.


I have several posts on my blog about how using the bread machine, along with recipes, but I'm not sure if it's ok to post my info here, so until I know it's ok, I won't do it.


I"m a long-time lurker.


HTH,


Darlene


 

LLM777's picture
LLM777

I forgot about gluten as a solution.  I will try it to see if it improves my texture.  I know others post their blogs so I would appreciate knowing yours. I'm sure there is a good sandwich bread out there that can be made in the bread machine.


Thank you!

LLM777's picture
LLM777

Why is it that the bread machine whole wheat recipes call for gluten or lecithin to help it rise or its texture?  If I mimic the times in the machine like doing it by hand such as an autolyse, 25 minute knead, 50 minute rise (until doubled), punch down, 25 minute rise, punch down, 40 minute rise (until doubled), then baked 40 minutes which I've done- Why is there such a difference in the bread or ingredients compared to doing it all by hand?


I guess I'm trying to cheat the system with the bread machine but I just haven't the experience by hand yet to know WHY there is a different product produced.


 


Thank you so much for your help! :)

umstetter's picture
umstetter

My blog is:


http://mamasnuthouse.blogspot.com/2007/08/whole-wheat-sandwich-bread-abm-foldable.html


The only thing I can think of is that a machine kneads the dough so much more efficiently than we tend to do by hand.


In my machine, you put in the wet ingredients in first, they the dry with the yeast last. I use olive oil and honey for sweetener, so those go in with the wet ingredients. Then the salt, gluten, milk powder - if I use it, and the flour. I make sure the flour covers all the liquid then I add the yeast on top. (This is the order my machine instructions calls for.)


My machine is then set and turned on. It starts with a minute of slow revolutions of the paddle, sort of like pulsing a food processor. Then it comes on and starts the kneading - much like a nice KA or Bosch mixer would. It kneads for about 10 mins and then lets it rest.


You could probably mimic the beginning process by placing the ingredients in the bowl minus about 1/2 of the flour and then using a hand mixer, mixing it for say 5 or so minutes on medium setting. Then add in the flour, by hand, until you have a properly hydrated dough. (Opinions seem to vary on this board as to how wet or dry that is. Don't look at me, I'm a newby to the way people here make bread! lol) Anyway, I would then continue kneeding the bread until it's elastic and let it rest. Then I would go about my recipe like you normally would.


This is all just a guess, but it seems logical to me. The mixer will superactivate (is there such a word?) the gluten and gets the yeasties going. A regular mixer can NOT handle a regular-density bread dough, it CAN handle a thick, almost slurry. So how well does your mixer handle cookie dough? Make it a little thinner than that cookie dough and after it has mixed for a while, add the rest of the dough by hand. I will hazard a guess and say the problem would be fixed.


By the way, vital gluten can be made at home. I have a recipe for it and I "think" I've posted it on the above blog. If not, I surely need to and can repost it here if you guys want it.


HTH,


Darlene