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Bröterich's blog

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Bröterich

I coped this from the Breadtopia website (https://breadtopia.com/brie-flower-bread-rolls/).

I am very impressed with the outcome. The was this morning's bake:

 

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Bröterich

dmsnyder's recent blog entry "San Joaquin sourdough two ways" (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/53813/san-joaquin-sourdough-two-ways) piqued my interest.

I had to try my hand at Pain rustique. I stuck to the recipe faithfully. I found the dough rather soft and had trouble shaping it. The dough didn't stay in shape for the last proofing phase, and the little buns appeared a bit flat but the final result is everything I had hoped for. This is my 1st. attempt at SJSD and I will definitely keep at it.

merci beaucoup mon amie

Tom

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Bröterich

I've been baking this traditional sourdough for quite a while now.

The method is described here:

http://breadtopia.com/whole-grain-sourdough/

I changed it by using rye sourdough starter rather than wheat as called for in the description, and because I was a little low on whole wheat flour this particular bread has a higher proportion of spelt.

Proofing was done in the fridge overnight and the dough had risen nicely and appeared to have nice gas bubbles in it. I de-gassed only lightly, formed a boule and rested in a bannten for about an hour before baking in a cloche. 

My question is: Do you think the crust is broken up too much. I slashed the bread but it almost looked as is if the top came off like a 'square academic cap'.

 Kind of scholarly, come to think of it :)

But what would be the reasons for such a break-out? Too little de-gassing, should I have given it more time for the 2nd proof?

Thanks for your input.

Tom

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Bröterich

I tried to recreate this nearly 100% rye bread according to the well known German bread blogger "brotdoc".

For a description, see here: https://brotdoc.com/?s=Poal

You can use the English translation of the website.

I modified the method somewhat, didn't use a machine to knead the bread, didn't have fresh yeast, and used a cloche to bake it. It turned out alright. The crumb is pretty dense and a day after baking is still very moist. It is close to the German tradition, however, as I remember it.

Tom

 

 

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Bröterich

Followed the recipe, except I used rye sourdough starter.

The beets came from our garden. The taste is superb, the crumb retains nice moisture.

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Bröterich

This is a modification of the Overnight Country Brown that Ken Forkish describes. In fact, I changed it so much that one might argue that it is not the same bread, but here it goes for one loaf:

Levain, active rye sourdough, 100% hydration, 110g

white bread flour, 250g

whole wheat flour 130g

12 grain flour 100g

water 340g at approx. 35 degrees Celsius

salt 11g.

I tried an autolyse but got impatient after 15 minutes and mixed everything by hand and kneaded it until it looked half-way mixed. I followed by 4 S&Fs in the bowl approximately 15-20 minutes apart. Then I let the dough rest for 2 hours at room temperature after which I placed it in the fridge for approx. 18 hours. I would say that the dough had more than doubled and had that nice spongy appearance when I I emptied it onto a floured board. Without messing too much with the dough I shaped it into a boule and placed it in a banneton for 45 minutes. I baked it in a cloche. The bread tastes absolutely fantastic, it has a fairly light open crumb, and the crust also had a good crunchy feel to it. To me it's definitely worth repeating.

Tom.

 

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Bröterich

This was first described here by freerk. 

I modified the recipe by not using yeast and using a very active rye starter (100% hydration). As high extraction flour I used Red Fife. The dough was very slack so that I could't really formed a batard, and I used an oblong cloche. The taste was beautiful.

Tom.

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Bröterich

I hadn't baked for a while and decided to make Field Blend # 2 form K. Forkish's FWSY.

I prepared the levain using 100g active rye sourdough starter and used Red Fife flour instead of the wholewheat.

Then I realized that the recipe calls for only 360g of the levain, and that 640g would be discarded.

Dang! As others said this sounds incredibly wasteful. So I thought of using the 640g of leftover levain.

It had risen nicely over 7 hours or so and looked almost like a poolish.

I took the 640g, added 100g Red Fife flour, 100g dark rye flour., and 160 g H2O. This gives an almost 80% hydration dough I believe. I did four S&Fs in th bowl over the next hour and let the dough rest for another hour. It was very slack and pretty much impossible to shape. I slid it into an oblong banter and placed it in the fridge overnight. I baked it straight out of the fridge in an oblong cloche. I didn't slash it. It came out pretty nice and it takes excellent.

In the future I'll think a bit more ahead but this 'experiment' turned out rather well.

(As an aside, I don't know what I'm doing wrong. I took this picture with an iPhone and for some reason the picture is rotated when I upload it. Any suggestions?

Tom)

 

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Bröterich

I tried to make this bread, being inspired very much by the video that FREERK made: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ik_UKKkjKLo

I baked this one in an oblong cloche.

Tom

 

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Bröterich

I tried this recipe yesterday which I found on the popular German site Pötzblog (http://www.ploetzblog.de/2014/08/02/leserwunsch-dunkles-bauernbrot-no-knead/),

essentially a sourdough wheat/rye mix. The author says it is one most of the most read recipes.

I made 2 loaves one in the dutch oven the other one a cloche. I was very pleasantly surprised.

My wife and I ate almost half of a loaf this morning for breakfast.

Tom.

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