The Fresh Loaf

A Community of Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts.

Brioche with Tangzhong

scoyu's picture
scoyu

Brioche with Tangzhong

 

It seemed like I was never going to find a fully enriched brioche recipe with tangzhong, so I went ahead and just tweaked a recipe I found in french ( http://www.dumieletdusel.com/archives/2013/10/18/28235220.html ). I ended up using a 120 gr of tangzhong which was sweetened with honey.

This worked beyond my wildest imaginations, I bulk fermented in the fridge overnight, no S&F, treated like a laminated dough to get layers, then rolled into a log and cut portions out to rise. The 'lamination' gives a great shreddable crumb. The tangzhong is a definite plus in rich brioche

 

Oh and I forgot to egg wash, doh

 

crumb shot

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

THis is beautiful.

 Thanks for the link.  How did you translate it?  I did not see an English version or a way to translate it on her site.  I know no French at all so am at a loss and would love to read her whole process.

Thanks for the inspiration.

Janet

scoyu's picture
scoyu

Thank you Janet! 

Alas, I am a native french speaker so I didn't have to translate it, really helps knowing that language for anything food related, the resources are tremendous and I'm just recently coming to appreciate it.

I think a google chrome translation would work ok as WildYeast said, if not, I can have a go at translating it for you. The brioche itself seems pretty straightforward, the particularity is the three turns she gives the dough pretty much exactly like a croissant without the beurrage.

 

 

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Scoyu and Wild Yeast,

Will have my teenage son help me operate my Google translate.  I just couldn't get it to work for me last night.  Some blogs have a translation tab built into them which make things easier so I have lost my Google Translate skills by relying on the built in translations..:*)

Janet

Wild-Yeast's picture
Wild-Yeast

@Scoyu,

Beautiful pastry! I went through the French recipe and decided that it's something I'd like to try in the coming holiday season. Madame Marie-Claire Frederic, the recipe's author is renowned for her seasonal tastes and naturally derived food preparation.

@Janet. Download Google Chrome and install it on your computer as an additional browser. It has the ability to translate foreign web pages into just about any language on the planet.

Wild-Yeast 

scoyu's picture
scoyu

Merci! I love how straightforward her instructions are, this one is a keeper.

If you try the tangzhong substitution, be aware that you might need a couple splashes of milk gradually to loosen the dough, mine was a little dry, but it worked out nicely in the end.

Papa

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

in their bread?

I was looking at the thick water from last night's noodles and wondering.   Potato water, and porridges act like water roux,  We are talking gelatinised starch, right?

Lovely brioche!

scoyu's picture
scoyu

Thanks Mini Oven!

I really like that idea,  if you saturated the water with pasta and end up with a creamy consistency it might be totally awesome. Very Interesting, I may try that soon

edroid's picture
edroid

Scoyu,

Your loaves look fantastic!

I would like to make the brioche with tangzhong, but can't quite figure out how you did it. 

The recipe calls for only 50 grams of milk. My understanding of how to make tangzhong is that if you used all the milk, it would only make a total of 60 grams of tangzhong, which would be only a bakers percent of 2%, yet you indicated you used 120 grams of tangzhong. 

Did you double the recipe, or did you adjust the hydration somehow? 

I might have to tackle this without the tangzhong first, then go back and experiment. 

Thanks for the inspiration! 

scoyu's picture
scoyu

Thanks edroid! glad to inspire in turn, floydm and txfarmer inspired me to try this with their tangzhong breads.

I left 50 grams out of the eggs to compensate for the extra hydration. So all in all I had

480 gr King Arthur AP Flour

120 gr Tangzhong (with KA Bread flour, milk and some honey)

175 gr eggs

5-10 gr of milk (maybe my tangzhong lost a little too much liquid when I was cooking it, but I had to add some milk gradually to combat stiffness during early mixing)

Good luck! It's been the favorite brioche I've made at my house so far.

Antilope's picture
Antilope

based on my experiences using the Tangzhong technique:

My Tangzhong FAQ

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/39723/my-tangzhong-roux-faq

edroid's picture
edroid

Thanks Antilope! I find the tangzhong method to be extremely interesting! Can't wait to try it. 

edroid's picture
edroid

I love the sound of Madame Frederic's recipe: Here it is with a truly painful translation using Google translate: 

https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=fr&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.dumieletdusel.com%2Farchives%2F2013%2F10%2F18%2F2823...

Notice how she makes a sponge in the center of the flour, and uses it to activate the yeast! 

I would like to try this recipe using tangzhong. I will use 10 grams of the flour and the 50 grams of milk to make the tangzhong. I will weigh the tangzhong to make sure I have the full 50 grams of hydration. 

My question is: can I use the tangzhong exactly as she uses the milk? In other words can I use the tangzhong to make the sponge (with instant yeast - je suis désolé, Madame Frederic) in the flour the same way she does? 

scoyu's picture
scoyu

Yeah! With instant yeast I don't see any troubles lying your way, you shouldn't even have to wait like she did with the fresh yeast. I actually used active dry yeast and didn't wait at all to mix it.

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Scoyu,

I have a question in regards to shaping. Did you fold your dough and then roll it out again before administering another folding as is done in a laminated dough or did you simply roll your dough out to the 2cm thickness she specifies and do all 3 foldings at one time with no rolling at all?

Thanks,

Janet

scoyu's picture
scoyu

On the site she suggests patting it into a rectangle when you pull it out from the fridge to a height of 2 cm, which is what I did. I then just folded it in thirds like a letter, then rolled it out to repeat.

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

THanks scoyu.  I wasn't sure if she did use a rolling pin or not.  Nice method for an easy mock laminated dough….

Janet

scoyu's picture
scoyu

No problem Janet! I added honey to my tangzhong based on your honey whole wheat loaf btw, great result even without the butter, so thank you as well!

edroid's picture
edroid

That was a lot of fun to make, but boy was it expensive!

First, the Kitchenaid mixer was worthless as far as mixing and kneading - underpowered and inefficient. I'm going to sell it. Then, I burned up the Cuisinart food processor - actual smoke. Finally got the dough sorted out and baked. Wow! Incredible crumb!

I used undersized bread pans. Next time I will use full size.

The expensive part came when I ordered an Ankarsrum mixer. . . 

Brioche w / Tangzhou

scoyu's picture
scoyu

Beautiful! Those look like some light and fluffy loaves.

I really thought my KitchenAid was going to crap out, but it pulled through. Could've fried an egg on top of it after though, think I may need a dedicated bread mixer in the near future, and use the KA for pastry or smaller doughs.

 

edroid's picture
edroid

Thanks again for the inspiration. It was a fun bread to make, incorporating new techniques that I had not tried. 

I loved how she in effect made a sponge right in the middle of the flour. Much more elegant than how Reinhart does it and much easier to scale. 

I will give the tangzhong a try in other breads, and the laminating has made me think I should try my hand at croissant. . .