The Fresh Loaf

A Community of Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts.

Kouign amann

jl's picture
jl

Kouign amann

This is something I've wanted to try for a long while now. What put me off was the fact that it seemed to require quite a bit of effort, because most videos you see on YouTube feature meticulously laminated single-serving-sized pastries. But then I saw a guy from Douarnenez making the authentic version:

I think his name is Thierry Lucas and he can be seen in another YouTube clip:

Turns out it's super simple and can be made with everyday pantry ingredients and there's no need to be particular about lamination.  I even had foil pie plates in the cupboard. (Ended up buying extra salty butter, because I wasn't sure how much salt they put in theirs in Brittany. Finnish extra salty butter is 2% salt.)

The dough was AP flour, 70% water, 2% salt, 1% dry yeast. Lucas' dough looked quite a bit looser. I think it's because he doesn't let it rest between the folds and it's easier to roll out.

500g of dough with 250 g butter and 250 g sugar is enough for cakes baked in 25 cm/10* pie plates:

Forgot to brush with milk and baked both simultaneously ~ 30 min at 220 C. Noticed afterwards someone suggesting in the comments to bake small ones 25 mins at 200 C and large ones 45 min at 200 C. Still, the cakes weren't too doughy on the inside.

I don't have much of a sweet tooth, but I ate three slices straight away. It's very buttery as one would expect. I still would like to taste the original some day, because for something as simple as this, the devil is most certainly in the details.

 

  

Comments

semolina_man's picture
semolina_man

Looks great!

 

Have a look at Bruno Albouze's Kouign-Amann video for another take on this:

https://youtu.be/XqVbT-xVrh0

 

jl's picture
jl

I've actually seen this one. I like his channel (love the presentation) and I want to get a stand mixer just to try some of his recipes, but this one is way too elaborate, in my opinion.

Abe's picture
Abe

I'm no fan of butter [an understatement]. Always had an aversion to it for as long as i remember. If it's disguised enough in a recipe and one can't taste it then i can be fooled into eating it. I'm all to well aware of how much butter goes into this and it's something i'll never have. So take this as a real compliment when i say it looks delicious. 

jl's picture
jl

Now I'm genuinely interested: how do you feel about croissants?

Abe's picture
Abe

A lot of what I don't like is the texture of butter. Don't like the taste or smell but more so in butter form. So when it's changed it's form within a scone, croissant, cookie etc. then it's ok. I once had a warmed croissant, on a flight, where the butter started to ooze out and it was awful. It also depends on how strong of a taste it has. Does it merely compliment the food item or is it overwhelmingly buttery?