The Fresh Loaf

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100% whole wheat

jl's picture
jl

100% whole wheat

Reused the previous whole spelt recipe for this one. This dough felt a lot stiffer than spelt, but still the hydration could be lowered a bit.

  • 15% pre-fermented flour (stiff starter), 86% hydration
  • 0.5h autolyse
  • mixed in salt and starter
  • 2.5h bulk fermentation
  • divided and pre-shaped very lightly
  • ~20 min rest
  • shaped and proofed ~45 min
  • baked 20 min with steam, 40 min without @ 220 C

The crumb looks much better in the picture than in real life. This is dense.

I was expecting it to be bitter(ish), but this is actually very tasty.

 

Comments

justkeepswimming's picture
justkeepswimming

Really nice looking crumb, sorry it's more dense than you care for. How is the chew?

I have been playing with various ratios of hard red  and hard white wheat. My recent favorites are 75-100% whole wheat, with about 20-25% as hard red.. The hard red I have is more bitter than I care for when I tried it by itself, but really adds a nice flavor when mixed with something else. Adding a little spelt is nice too. 

Mary

jl's picture
jl

Do you mill yourself? 

justkeepswimming's picture
justkeepswimming

I do mill at home. I am not as much of a home milled flour purist as some, occasionally adding some AP or bread flour. Some friends really like the flavor of the Jim Lahey no knead bread and I make that for them, sneaking a smidge of home milled flour into the loaf. 😉

Using home milled flour definitely adds another layer of baking complexity and has its own learning curve. I would have benefitted from mastering a few things before diving into the deep end of the proverbial pool, but at least it has all tasted good. And getting into home milling helped keep my sanity during lockdown, so there is that added benefit.

Mary

Benito's picture
Benito

You’re right, the crumb does look quite good in that photo.  You said that the dough was stiff yet you also said that the hydration could be lowered more.  What leads you to that conclusion?  I ask because the bread doesn’t look over hydrated to me and I’m wondering what I’m missing.  That bake looks great to me, it wasn’t a pancake like so many of my 100% whole red fife loaves have been.

Benny

jl's picture
jl

I think the loaf would have been taller and more round with a bit less water in it. On the other hand, mixing 1400 g of dough by hand would be even more work at a lower hydration. It may be worthwhile to try to bake it a bit sooner to make it more round, but the crumb would probably be even more closed.

justkeepswimming's picture
justkeepswimming

Have you tried this recipe using mostly wheat with a little spelt? Maybe 10% of the flour as spelt, without changing anything else? It's amazing what that little bit does to the dough texture.

You can get a little bit of a feel for the difference the spelt makes by mixing maybe 50 gm whole wheat with water, and 40 gm WW/10 gm spelt with water. Or less, these are just easy numbers to work with. Let them rest for a bit (autolyse), then see what you think. It's a fun experiment without committing to making a whole loaf.

jl's picture
jl

That hadn't occured to me. Thank you for the suggestion! Another interesting thing to try would be to bake whole wheat and whole wheat & spelt loaves side by side and compare the taste. 

HeiHei29er's picture
HeiHei29er

Looks like a great crumb to me!  I like the rustic look of the loaves.  Proof them seam side down?