The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Recent Blog Entries

  • Pin It
rmk129's picture
rmk129

This blog entry is so that I don't forget what I did to make this loaf when I lose the scrap piece of paper I wrote it on :)

50% Whole Wheat Sourdough Bread 1 1/2 cups proofed white sourdough starter 1 1/2 cups warm water 2 Tbsp oil 1 Tbsp brown sugar 3 cups whole wheat flour ~1 cup of white flour 1 1/2 tsp salt 1 Tbsp vital wheat gluten

Baking schedule: -mixed together all ingredients (except salt) until moist -20 minute autolyze -added salt -kneaded with mixmaster for ~5 minutes 0 hrs->put in greased, covered bowl for first rise 2 hrs->folded dough 4 hrs->folded dough 5 1/2 hrs->shaped dough into two small round loaves and put them in my basket & tupperware "cloches" lined with floured dishtowels, then tied a plastic bag around the cloches. I put one in the refrigerator to retard overnight, and left the other out for the second rise. 9 1/2 hrs->sprinkled semolina flour on the exposed portion of dough mass (still in cloche), then carefully inverted onto baking mat, scored, and put in preheated oven

Still in oven right now...unbelievable oven spring!!!

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I made a simple dough this morning with the intent of making some type of a picnic bread today. Something with cheese and onion, perhaps olives or sausage mixed in. But then we ended up picnicing at the lake today as well. After a long day in the sun, I just couldn't face the prospect of baking in 90 degree weather. Actually, it wasn't the baking as much as having the house heat up, particularly the upstairs bedroom, which get sweltering on hot days. So I froze the dough for a later date.

The heat did not stop my son, however:

His toy broom, which has hardly a bristle left, has recently been transformed into a peel. A super peel, perhaps?

;^)

He spent a good half hour loading and unloading loaves in the oven (hot tub lid) while we made dinner.

rmk129's picture
rmk129

Thanks to this site, I baked my very first sourdough loaf today after two weeks of preparation :) Yippeeee!!!

It certainly is not the perfect loaf (quite flat), but I am just happy that I grew yeast from scratch that caused any rising action at all (thanks to a mixture of Floydm & sourdolady's starter recipes and advice)...
|
|
Here is a pictoral account of my adventure...Day 1 is the day I began making my homemade starter.
|
Day 5...my first big day of "bubble action" in my homemade starter!!!
June 16 003
|
|
Day 9...getting more ambitious with a white and a whole-wheat version of my starter
...and also a mini-mug of raisins soaking in rum for a bread-pudding and many supplies for drinking yerba mate! :)
June 16 009
|
|
Day 15...this is what my starter looked like after proofing it overnight for 15 hours
(no, I didn't sleep that long!)
I think I added 1 cup of flour and 1 cup of water to 1/2 cup of active room-temperature starter the night before, but I have no idea if this is the correct method???
June 24 007
|
Consistency of proofed starter after stirring...
June 24 008
|
|
I used sourdolady's recipe for Deluxe Sourdough Bread

Initial ingredient mixture...let rest for 30 minutes
June 24 009
|
After kneading
June 24 010
|
|
After approximately 5 hours at a cool room temperature, there was definite evidence of "yeasty action"!!!
I was SO happy :)
June 24 013
|
|
A few hours later, I thought the dough was ready for shaping (even though it had not quite doubled in size)
I like to call these wet masses of dough my pre-shaping "globs"
June 24 015
|
|
I shaped one using a basket as a cloche (it is still in my fridge unbaked), and this one I tried as a freeform oval
June 24 019
|
|
Both shaped loaves went into the fridge overnight.
In the morning, the oval loaf was significantly flatter, and there were chunks of ice on the baking mat!!! Yikes!!!
I took the oval log out and left in on the counter for 8 hours, during which it magically transformed itself into a Ciabatta loaf sitting in a puddle of water ;)
Whoops! Maybe I let it rise for too long?
Oh well....I thought the final product was yummy (slightly sour taste) and I loved the texture of the crumb.
Thanks to a World Cup game that captured my attention (Vamos Argentina!!!), the bottom was quite black, but I am getting quite adept at scraping black bottoms into the garbage can :)
|
Final product--My First Sourdough Loaf!!!
June 24 020
June 24 023
|
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
|
Pizza crust from starter leftovers....
I mostly followed Floydm's measurements to make a delicious pizza crust
1 cup starter
2 cups flour
1 cup water
2 tsp salt
2 Tbsp olive oil (my addition)
I had a lot of fun shaping this crust (like he suggestd, just turned it around and around, stretching the dough into an approximate circle), and it turned out well.
|
Sourdough pizza crust before baking
My husband likes to prebake the crust with olive oil, then bake it for a short time with toppings...works well for me too!
June 24 012
|
What was left of the pizza before I remembered to take a photo...sign of a yummy pizza :)
June 24 024

rmk129's picture
rmk129

Coffee Bread Pudding Recipe
June 24 003

Last week I found myself with a huge tupperware container full of staling bread of various types, so I made this bread pudding (from a mixture of different recipes I found on the internet) and it was a big hit at tea time. I want to record the recipe here before I lose the scrap piece of paper I wrote it on as I went... :)
-
Step 1: Soak raisins in alcohol
~3 days before, I started 1/4 cup raisins soaking in enough rum to cover them (3 Tbsp?). I thought I was going to make the pudding that night, but I didn't have time and boy were the raising yummy when I finally got around to using them!!!
-
Step 2: Mix and heat liquids to scalding
2 cups light cream
2 cups milk
1/2 cup strong coffee
-
Step 3: Beat together until smooth
5 eggs (room temp)
1/3 cup butter
3/4 cup brown sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1/8 tsp ground nutmeg
-
Step 4: Mix Step 2 & 3 ingredients together
Slowly!!! (so eggs don't cook)
-
Step 5: Assemble bread pudding
8 cups stale/oven-dried bread cubes (very approximate amount...I used a mixture of chocolate coffee bread and daily bread).
*I don't have many baking pans, so I simply divided the bread cubes and put them into 2 well-greased loaf pans, sprinkling the raisins and rum (Step 1) throughout the layers.
*Pour warm liquid mixture from Step 4 over the bread mixture and press the bread down so it is well-soaked.
*Let sit 45 minutes
-
Step 6: Bake!!!
I don't have control over my oven temperature, but I baked them at a "moderate" temperature for about 1 hour (until a toothpick in the center came out clean.
-
Step 7: Glaze (optional)
I made a quick glaze out of icing sugar, rum and lemon juice and distributed it over the top of the warm puddings.
-
Step 8: EAT!!!
Delicious warm or cold :)
-
*************************************************************************************************************************
Another bake from last week (not the most beautiful loaf, but it is beautiful in my eyes!)
-
Floydm's Rustic Loaf with rye flour...now a much-requested favourite of my husband's family :)
They can't get over how long is stays fresh-tasting for, and even the kids love it! Thanks Floydm!!!

June 24 005

Lee Geyer's picture
Lee Geyer

Made two loaves today...

The first was a sourdough from a whole wheat starter that has been doing just fine for the past month. I usually keep it 100% whole wheat but decided to emulate the sifted wheat flour as recommended by Peter Reinhart for the miche, but made two smaller loaves and am retarding one for tomorrow to see if it makes much of a difference. I put a little extra into the slashing for fun, emulating something I'd seen.

The next was a pugliese (Bread Baker's apprentice) now that I have my hands on some Duram flour. I decided to brush off most of the flour from the banneton and put a fleur de "Lee" using Semolina...next time I am going to leave the flour on, spray water on the stencil and then add semolina so that the loaf retains that rustic look with a logo. I am also retarding one of these for tomorrow to see if there is much difference. Today's loaf is as follows:

The results are as follows:

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

timtune's picture
timtune

My attempt at 100% Rye Finnish sourdough bread.
It seems that it's hung by the ceiling on a pole all year round. That explains the hole in the centre. It also seems that this bread's suppose to keep all year round especially in the cold & cruel Scandinavian winter. It's gonna be winter here too, in Aus... :)

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Well, since i lack a pole, that also explains the string tied around it. It's hanging in my closet alongside a slab of beef (dun ask why :P), drying and waiting to be tasted in a few days time.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

June 20, 2006

I can't imagine what my loaves would be without the wonderful special bread spices. Oh poppycock, yes I do, they would be bland and almost boring. You see I bake low salt. Now if I want to cut back on the salt something has to add some flavour. I started out putting in bread spices (the flavour) not because of the lack of salt but just because I like it. Reducing the salt was easy.

When my local baker found out I would be going off to a foreign land, and would probably be baking, (Why bother in Austria where the bread, cheese and wine are so good!) he would give me a good 1/4 kilo portion of his special brotgewürz. On one condition, that I don't bring any of it back with me and go into competition with him. Fair enough.

Rye is my favorite grain, followed by oats and corn. Now when I first started out with rye, something always seemed to be missing. I threw in all kinds of combinations and included molasses. Molasses was a key. Eliminate the sugar and add molasses. Caraway rye, well who never heard of caraway and rye? Now the rye needed some glue and white bread flour fit the bill, a handful or two, and sometimes powdered milk, sometimes a spoon or two of oil. The secret was the spices and plenty of it. Well, my baker died, God bless his soul, and with him his secret. Before I came here to China, I also knew I'd be baking so off I went to my Austrian Supermarket in search of spice.... and low and behold! They now sell Brotgewürz and in the handy 320gm plastic vacuum sealed jar! Perfect for traveling.

You may laugh about this or you may cry but I'm just happy. It isn't quite the same, but it's very good. Now what are those ingredients? Well a combination of Fennel, Coriander and Caraway seeds, crushed. Packaged by Kotanyi GmbH In what proportions it doesn't say but it wouldn't take too long to figure it out. I personally add more caraway and it is a very hard seed to crush. I even like it in white bread or sprinkled on top of rolls.

The recipe on the label is for Farmer's bread from Frank Zimmer, a classic:

Farmer's Rye Bread

  • 570 gm Rye Bread Flour
  • 60 gm Wheat Bread Flour
  • 500 ml Water
  • 16 gm Sourdough
  • 13 gm Salt
  • 15 gm Yeast
  • 4 Tablespoons Brotgewürz or mix of Crushed Fennel, Coriander and Caraway

Mix all ingredients into a dough and knead till smooth and elastic. Let rest 30 minutes. Put into the desired shape and form and eventually bake in preheated oven 200°c for 65 minutes.

I haven't tried this recipe but it seems in order. I would reduce the salt to less than 10 gm. (one teaspoon=5 gm) If you choose to use only sourdough and no commercial yeast, I suggest letting it rise in floured form for 20 min before putting into the oven. As you can see, there is no sugar, A flat tablespoon of honey or molasses might help the sourdough rise. If your sourdough is as soupy as mine, use two cups of it and reduce the water above to about 200ml or 300ml. The dough looks like a wet one. The kind I like to beat in the bowl with a sturdy spoon.

Try putting some spices into your favorite recipe. Have you tried any yet? It's great just wiffing the jar! Have Fun.... :) Mini Oven

Yeasty Loaf's picture
Yeasty Loaf

Hi All,

Just thought I’d introduce myself. I’m from England and new to the art of Baking Bread. I have been baking bread for about 6 weeks and have had lots of successes as well as lots of failures.

My greatest achievement has been a Wheatsheaf Loaf. I was so proud that I’ve varnished it!

I like baking using traditional methods and love making loaves that are rarely seen in British bakeries like a good cottage loaf. i have a few bread books namely Paul Hollywoods and Bread which was once published as the Encyclopaedia of Bread. They are great but can't wait until my order for the Bread Baker's Apprentice comes in.

I'm also really excited about having ago at my first starter!.

hopefully i will be able to knock off work early today and get some baking in!

On a serious note; the biggest problem I’m having at the moment is slashing my loaves. When I slash them, the knife catches on the dough and wrinkles it. Any top tips?

Look forwarded to updating you on my progress and sharing ideas etc. Great website by the way i've already had tonnes of top tips. thanks a million!

Floydm's picture
Floydm

For father's day, I chose to stick around the house, play with the kids, and bake. I made Dan Lepard's Flax Seed Wheat Bread again.

flax seed bread

Really good stuff.

flax seed bread

The big dessert was a cheesecake (store bought) with a raspberry sauce made with fresh, local berries. The strawberries are beginning to fade, but now we move into my favorite time of the year, when fresh Oregon raspberries and peaches are abundant.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I don't know if anyone else noticed, but today smiddlet posted the 1000th node on this site. Thank you, everyone who has contributed and made this site a useful place to visit.

I continue to be slammed at work, which accounts for my inability to provide fresh content here. There has also been the spring cleaning, getting the garden going, family visits, hyperactive children, and a nasty outbreak of moths (clothes moths, not grain moths) in our house to keep me occupied. I am determined to bake and post new content again soon.

Pages

Subscribe to Recent Blog Entries