The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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KipperCat's picture
KipperCat

I was visiting with my sister in Wisconsin, and we joined several other family members for a July 4th get-together at my cousins' cottage. I decided to bring bread for my contribution and thought it would be best if baked fresh. So the night before I started 2 loaves each of white and whole wheat NYT No-Knead bread. In the morning, I folded each loaf and placed in an oiled ziploc bag. The bags were carefully placed in a soft sided picnic-cooler-on-wheels. At that point I realized that the cooler-on-wheels wasn't about to stand up straight and give the dough the gentle treatment I had hoped! It flopped over there in the kitchen and did so more than once more throughout the day.

Anyway, the cooler was stowed in the back seat and we headed off 100 miles to the cabin. After visiting for awhile I was going inside to bake my bread. Cousin Jeff told me that wasn't a good idea. It seems a squatter had been resident in the oven the week before. While the mouse had been evicted, the thorough cleaning needed after a bad tenant had yet to be done. So my cousin and I walked around the pond and up the hill to the other cabin. At that point I was very glad for the wheels! This kitchen was spotless, and even had a bench knife in the drawer to help with the final fold. When I opened the cooler, the zip bags were puffed out like plump pillows from the risen dough! Here I shaped and baked the loaves. The bread was very popular, with 2 requests for the recipe. I wish I had pictures - of all the family, and the bread that did just fine with that rough handling. :~)

 

Dolly's picture
Dolly

How long has it been since anyone has thought of the Tassajara bread book? I actually have a 1978, twenty first printing, copy of what to me back then was the ultimate zen bread bible. Much water has flowed under the bridge, I've left bread baking, come back to it, on may occasions. I have started and done away with more sourdough starters than I can count. Now I'm back baking with a vengence, obsessing over artisan style loaves, no knead 1869 recipes, growing a starter that is being very generous to me. For the last six months I've been baking all my families bread. Hubby loves it, the kids like certain things like French bread, pass on the seven grain, gobble the cinnamon buns, devour grandma's bun recipe but still look longingly at their favourite cardboard foam bread when we pass it in the supermarket. I figure another 3 months and they will stop. They are getting more adventerous; they are beginning to realize we won't be going back.

What has promted this rennaisance? Heath issues that force me to retire? Turning 50? Being concerned about what goes into our food? What ever it is, I love my homecoming. I am having fun.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I'm wiped out tonight. Had a great weekend taking the kids camping for the first time, rafting down the Sandy River, and generally enjoying summertime.

Nevertheless, I baked. Well? No, not at all. I made a mess of most everything I touched, but they still tasted quite good.

(Perhaps that could be a a new motto for the site: "Artisan Baking: Because even your mistakes are tasty!")

I tried a bunch of recipes from Daniel Leader's soon-to-be-released book Local Breads: Sourdough and Whole-Grain Recipes from Europe's Best Artisan Bakers. As I said, I screwed them all up, but that isn't the books fault, that was me thinking "Oh, I can make it down the river in time to not overproof the loaves." I was wrong. I also mixed up my whole wheat starter and my rye starter, so my final rye and whole wheat breads ended up tasting quite a bit like one another.

Picture time.

french breadsSimple French Bread Loaves

rye breadsPolish Rye Bread

rye bread insideInside the Rye (with Caraway)

I'll write up a real review in the next few days, but I definitely think the Daniel Leader book is a winner. Solid recipes, nice design and typography, very accessible. Definitely a good one, and going to give Peter Reinhart's new book a run for bakers interested in whole grain baking's money this fall.

I also baked an Orange Honey Prune bread from Beth Hensberger's The Bread Bible. Convenient since, as zainaba22 pointed out, the theme of this month's bread baking day is bread with fruit.

prune bread

Very good stuff. I'll post the recipe in the next couple of days.

beenjamming's picture
beenjamming

So for a while I've been meaning to start documenting my baking a little better, and contribute a bit more to this wonderful site, and today! today is the day.

This weekend I had three buddies from Rochester come down to ithaca to visit for the weekend, and I had some more friends over and I pounded out half a dozen pizzas. I had some serious doubts that my apartments rickety half-size oven was up to the task. Turns out the bugger gets up to a solid 550F and is fantastic for pizza (though it heats kinda unevenly, but nothing a mid-bake spin can't fix). My camera batteries were dead or i'd share some pictures but for fun, here's the lineup: 2 Margherita, 2 Chicken Wing(fried chicken tossed in franks red hot, sharp cheddar, low moisture mozz, danish blue and a few dots of roasted garlic), 1 roasted tri-color pepper pesto pie and 1 sauted mushroom and roasted garlic pie. Those last couple had healthy dollops of herbed riccota, fresh cow's milk mozz, parmigiano and all the pie were on top of Reinhart's neo-neopolitan dough with an extra tablespoon of honey. Far as i'm concerned, that's about the easiest to handle and best tasting pizza dough i've ever had. Here's a pic of an older pie, white pizza with tomatoes:

white with tomatoes

This afternoon I also put my young starter to the test and mixed up a batch of thom leonard's kalamata olive bread from Glezer's "Artisan Baking".

tlkob

I took a few liberties, which is to say I didn't listen to ms maggie when she told me to mail order olives, and I used a smalled percentage of ripe oil-cured olives to replace the softer kalamatas she calls for. Loaves turned out pretty well...the crumb is a bit dense and the loaves sourness isn't terribly pronounced. I've been having some issues keeping my starter sour. It was very sour initially, but one miserably hot week later its sweeter and much less potent. I've been feeding it with ice water (lowering the temp to promote acetic acid, not sure if it's working) and trying to catch and feed it before it smells even faintly alcoholic in order to bring back it's potency (it's smelling less sweet and has got a little tang back). Any suggestions on this front would be really appreciated.

crumb

 

As for the crumb issues, I think i could have let the dough proof a little longer and i also forgot to fold it until the 2nd hour of fermentation. I rushed the proofing a bit in a frustrated fit after I tripped over my still unpacked slow cooker in my bedroom floor and broke my pinky toe. It had been a bit to long since a mid-baking injury occured. i suppose i was due, haha.

I was pleased with how everything turned out and have to say that buying glezer's book was probably the best decision i've made since getting bba. Absolutley gorgeous pictures and warming baker profiles. I highly recommend it to any fellow intermediate baker. This following weekend I'll be in NJ, but there'll be plenty more bread on the way this week (i'm planning a roasted garlic/asiago cheese ciabatta, a saranac b&t loaf with caraway and onions, and maybe some pane siliciano). take it easy everyone!

zainaba22's picture
zainaba22

Becke from Colombus Foddie has unveiled the new theme for breadbakingday #02 - bread with fruit.

More information about how to participate, deadline etc. you'll find here.

1 cup white flour.


3\4 teaspoon baking powder.


1\4 teaspoon baking soda.


1\2 teaspoon ground cardamom.


3\4 cup dried dates.


1\3 cup hot water.


1\2 cup butter.


1\2 cup brown sugar.


1 teaspoon vanilla.


4 eggs.


1 teaspoon salt.


1 cup Chopped walnut.


1/2 cup fresh dates, chopped. (Optional)


1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds.

1) Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

2) In a small bowel mix together:1\3 cup hot boiling water + 3\4 cup dried dates. (let it cool before use it).

3)In the bowl of an electric mixer cream together butter and sugars for 2 minutes.

Add eggs mixing well, Reduce speed to low and add dates mix, dry ingredients, vanilla, fresh dates and Chopped walnut; mix until well combined.

4) Pour the batter into the prepared (9 inch pan), and smooth the top. Sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds.

5) Bake for 20-25 minutes. Serve with Arabic coffee.

 

http://arabicbites.blogspot.com/


ryan_d's picture
ryan_d

Being new to the baking world, I've been trying out different breads that caught me interest. The first one was made about two weeks ago with help from my girlfriend. Being a Philadelphia boy living in Atlanta, I've been missing pretzels. Watching Good Eats the other day was a new episode dedicated to pretzels so I figured why not.

 

Here's a picture after the baking soda soak. Watching this pretzel episode, Alton Brown shows how to use bowling baking soda instead of the lye bath to get nice color on them so this is the route I took.

This one I'm quite proud of. My girlfriend and I couldn't find pretzel salt anywhere and we didn't want to order it online because we wanted to cook that night. Our best idea, go to the mall and sweet talk the Auntie Anne's Pretzel girl for some. What we got was almost a full pound of the white stuff.

 

Lastly, a few shots of the final product. I didn't rotate them properly so the ones on the top rack got darker than the bottom, but they were all good.

 

The second bread was made last night and was my attempt at italian bread. It came out quite good but I'm still having a problem w/ a lot of my breads where the top is rock hard. I'm going to have to ask in the forums when I get a chance. Otherwise, this was quite tasty, especially for a midnight PB & J :)

 

 

 

Thegreenbaker's picture
Thegreenbaker

SO, I havent made bread in a little while apart from my LSA mix bread that tasted great but never cook properly. I have been hankering for some good real bread.

So Monday evening I mixed together my preferment 1kg of flour in total, but a mixture of rye, wholemeal whole wheat, white unbleached wheat, semolina flour, gluten flour, salt, yeast, Rice bran oil.

I left it out all night until around 10am when I begn to make it into bread.

I added Wholemeal wheat flour, white unbleach flour, gluten flour and medium grind semolina into one bowl. I added half the preferment, 1 cup of water and 1 cup of buttermilk, 1 teaspoon of yeast and 1 of salt. mixed and kneaded and left of an oiled tray covered with a wet teatowl to rise.

I then mixed another bowl with wholemeal wheat, white unbleached wheat, gluten flour, rye flour the rest of the preferment, oil and buttermilk, salt and yeast. Mixed and kneaded this also and put aside to rise as I did for the other dough.

I left them for 3 1/2 hours. Came back, folded and left for another 2 hours.

Came back and divided and shaped the semolina dough which I came to call the Pugliese (even though a Pugliese doesnt contain rye or buttermilk.....it is my version of it now ;))

I loosely chaped it into 3 rustic loaves and 2 rolls. the rustic loaves I tried to shape into ciabatta loaf shapes and one I made my first Fendu. Turned out nicely :)

The rye I left for a third rise as I just didnt have time to shape it, so I folded it and left it covered for another 90 mins.

It became a big sandwich loaf and 5 rolls.

It all came out so well, and I am so happy with myself! What lovely bread!

 

The Fendu isnt in the picture because we had already eaten it!!! 

 

Thegreenbaker

 

xabanga's picture
xabanga

I've been craving chocolate lately so I made these on a whim:

Here is the recipe link.

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

HAMBURGER BUNSHAMBURGER BUNSHAMBURGER BUNS HAMBURGER BUNS

Thanks Bill for the great recipe. These were fun to make and I'll certainly make them often. I made them 3 oz. each so ended up with 12 or 13 rolls for each batch. I made sandwichs with the first tomato from the garden and our lettuce too. I didn't have time to take a better picture because my husband was standing there begging for his second sandwich. He said I take more pictures of my breads than of my grandchildren:D.

 

 

Anyway, I have to improve my shaping some but otherwise these are sooo good and easy to make.

 

 

By the way, what does 30g of olive oil come to in tablespoons? 

Thegreenbaker's picture
Thegreenbaker

I decided to make a quick loaf of bread yesterday. As I was mixing the half white half wholemeal flours I thought to myself "What could give this extra flavour?" I then remembered that I had just purchased some LSA mix (linsees, sunflower seed and almond all ground up) and threw in 70 grams of it.

Once hydrated the dough was sticky and I had to keep adding flour to get it to not stick to my hands.

It rose nicely, but not as high as my normal daily bread and the oven spring wasnt as good as I normally get it either.

I baked it for 45 mins at  190 degrees celcius. I took it out of the oven and let it cool for a good 15 mins then broke it open and it was so moist and doughy I was shocked, so I put it back in the oven and baked it for another 15-20 mins.

The crust was nearly burned but it was still moist.

I think it was the LSA mix.  Linseed has a quality to it that makes it a good binding agent. It gets gelatinous and gooey and is used as an egg replacer. I once added them to some muffins (whole not ground) and soaked them first to make them easier to chew and the water became gelatinous and was absorbed by whatever the coating is around the seed to make the whole lot quite icky looking, lind of like fross eggs.  (I know! Sorry about the mental picture!)

So I am pretty sure it was the ground Linseed but am now worried about the state of the oven. :S

 

Although the bread was doughy, it was actually cooked....just very very moist, and it tasted wonderful........SUCH a pity about the effect the linseed has! (flax seed) 

 

thegreenbaker 

 

 

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