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dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Maybe this belongs in the "You know you're a bread baker when ..." topic.

I'm going to visit my younger son and his family next week. I haven't started packing, but I have the breads baked. 

 

This is basically my San Joaquin Sourdough but made with the Gérard Rubaud flour mix. I tasted this loaf's mate yesterday (as in 4 slices). The truth is, Rubaud's flour mix is better when baked using Rubaud's formula and methods, and the San Joaquin Sourdough is better using my usual AP with 10% dark rye. Live and learn. Not that this is bad bread. It's just not astonishingly wonderful. (My grand daughters deserve astonishingly wonderful bread.)

 

These boules are the San Francisco Sourdough from Michel Suas' "Advanced Bread & Pastry." It's a wonderful bread. I spiked my starter flour mix which already has 10% rye with extra rye and made a very firm starter which was allowed to ferment for about 16 hours at room temperature. I got a bit more sour tang than previous bakes, which was what I was shooting for. 

The crust is nice and crisp, and the crumb is quite open for moderate hydration (67%?) bread.

 

And, mostly because of how my wife's face lights up when she walks into the house while it's baking ...

The Cinnamon-Raisin-Walnut Bread from Reinhart's "The Bread Baker's Apprentice." 

I feel better, knowing we won't starve in Las Vegas.

David

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Hey All,

Just wanted to let you know that I found a place that carries malted barley flour in NYC.  I haven't checked the other markets that I usually go to, ie: Fairway, Whole Foods.  I found this at the Korean Market "Han Ah Reum" on 32nd Street between Broadway and 5th Avenue in Koreatown.  It is the Choripdong brand.  They also have malted barley that's crushed.  It's $4.99 for 2lbs. 

Tim

Sedlmaierin's picture
Sedlmaierin

Quick recap of the baguette baking:

-followed the recipe apart from the fact that I did not have enough AP flour on hand and sifted some stone ground white whole wheat flour to make up the difference.I think the ratio was about 3/4 AP to 1/4 WWW

-read and re-read about pre-shaping and shaping three times........even though it might not look it, that part seemed to go a lot better

-final proof was for about 1 hour 15 minutes

-the crumb is very light  and has a beautiful fragrant flavor;deeper taste probably due to the inclusion of the whole wheat

overall I feel this is an improvement from the last two tries......if I keep on working on baguette baking I  guess I will have to buy a peel.That was the most frustrating part-transferring my nearly perfect looking risen loaves to the oven-and scoring................let's not even talk about it! I don't know which way to adjust-am I scoring too deeply,does it need to go deeper?

Anyways, am happily munching on these guys!

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Hey All,

Just wanted to share with you my attempt at No Knead Bread from 4/25/10.  Enjoy!  The recipe will be posted below.

Tim

Ingredients:

1000g AP (Hecker’s)

800g Water

22g Kosher Salt

1/4 tsp Active Dry Yeast

1823g Total Dough

Instructions:

Night before baking

9:15pm – Mix all ingredients together in large mixing bowl with a wooden spoon.  Mix well so there are no dry spots or lumps.  Transfer with plastic scraper to a lightly oiled 6L plastic container with cover.  Leave on counter overnight.  (I used a 4L container, which was too small for the dough.  It popped the top of the container off)

Morning of baking:

6:30am – Turn dough out onto well floured surface, divide into 2 equal pieces, shape into boules, place into well floured linen lined bannetons.  Place bannetons into large plastic bags, proof for about 1 1/2 hrs.

7:15am – Place 2 baking stones on different levels, along with steam pan, preheat to 550F.

8:00am – Turn loaves out onto lightly floured peel, slash if desired, place in oven directly on stone.  When all loaves are in, add 1 cup of water to steam pan, turn oven down to 450F.  Bake for 25 minutes at 450F.  Rotate loaves between stones, turn down to 425F, bake for another 25 minutes or until internal temp reaches 210F.  Cool completely before cutting and eating…

Notes: I proofed the loaves for about 1 hr, which is probably why I had some blowouts.  I hid them with some careful photography...  Also, the crumb was very even, but very light and airy.  I probably handled them too much during the shaping...  I am quite happy with the result and taste and will probably make more of this no knead stuff out of sheer laziness...

 

wspahr's picture
wspahr

I am looking for information about how long one can store bread in the freezer without degradation or absorbing freezer odors. I am making some english muffins, scones and baguettes for a week long training session at our church. There will be about 30 people at the training session so I will need to stockpile to have enough. I have frozen bread before by wrapping in plastic wrap and then putting in a plastic bread bad from KA. If any one has any suggestions about wrapping bread prior to freezing, they would be appreciated.

Thanks

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Hey All,

Just wanted to share with you my 50% rye bread with a bunch of seeds from 4/24/10.   It's got flax seeds, sunflower seeds, and pumpkin seeds.  Enjoy!

Tim

djd's picture
djd

The pictures probably tell the story here, yes?

 

sourdough1

sourdough1

 

davidg618's picture
davidg618

Friday

 

Saturday

 

Sunday

 

David G

Jw's picture
Jw

Instead of waiting 30 minutes (or so) to put the dough in the fridge (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/12571/lazy-bread-twenty) I put it in right away after mixing. Overnight not much happened and in the morning I took it out for a few more hours slow rising at room temperature. The taste is much better this way. Note: I don't shape the bread either (lazy me...).  The mix of flour: 1/4 is of a 'five grain' type, 3/4 is plain white.

Cheers,
Jw. (still going strong with my study, glimpsing at great TFL results every now and then).

 

 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

This is the high extraction miche i made from Peter Reinhart's Whole grain breads.

For nearly a 100% wholewheat, it was surprisingly light. It benefited from a 3 days retardation in the dridge, talk about crazy schedule!

I havn't tasted it yet, but iam sure it should taste ok.

 

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