The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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erasch's picture
erasch

Did you ever try the recipe for White Vienna Loaf from Waltrose Illustrated?  Your entry from a year ago fascinates me.

Thanks. 

beanfromex's picture
beanfromex

With living in a humid and hot country, I find my desire to bake dwindles when the hot weather is upon us.

Here, in southern mexico, by mid february, we are into the high 90's usually. In march ,105 F is usual. Kitchens are traditionally not air conditioned, as that is where the maid works. (Read "me" for maid when it comes to baking and cooking)

So last night, I could not go without bread any longer. I mixed up a huge batch (12 c) of AP flour and did the NYT method overnight, in the fridge. I discovered that a high sided oval plastic container I have would easily hold 24 cups of flour for the next time I do bread for the neighbours.

This morning, at 5 am, I started folding and bringing the dough to room temp.

I now have two 6 cup loaves in the oven. Both covered with bran.

The kitchen at 6:45 am is 30C.

One of the only ways I can get my brad "fix" is by reading the recipes and comments from the various participants of this forum..

Thank you everyone.

 

Regards from southern mexico

slothbear's picture
slothbear

flat flat ww sourdough

I was inspired by Jane and Srishti and the other folks trying whole wheat sourdough (thanks!), so I tried it. I started with the proportions I found here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/2059/100-whole-wheat-bread#comment-7919

My variations -- I halved the recipe, kneaded in my Zojirushi bread maker, and used my white sourdough starter and Whole Foods whole wheat flour. My my I love weighing ingredients, especially in grams. I just keep slinging stuff into the bowl, so fun and easy.

Everything proceeded nicely until the final rise. Instead of rising like New York, it spread out like Los Angeles. The resulting bread was delicious, but in the interest of bread art (and sandwiches), I'd like it to be a little taller. I'm still new to sourdough, but am loving every trial. My starter is quite vigorous -- I'm pretty sure that part is ok.  Any suggestions?

TinGull's picture
TinGull

Simple rye/honey/water starter.  This one came out SUPER soft...incredibley soft.  I absolutely am in love with the texture.  It's kind of a mixture of all sorts of flours since I had a tons of small amounts left.  I had some organic gold&white from my co-op, KA AP, KA bread flour, and rye from my coop, and a stone ground white from a water mill a couple towns over.  Yea...5 kinds of flour in this bread.  It's wonderful!

 

 

mountaindog's picture
mountaindog

I've been real busy the past few weeks so have not been online much, but did make time to bake each weekend.

Back in Feb., I was lamenting that my Thom Leonard boules, which I had been making successfully for weeks, were suddenly getting overproofed and collapsing when hitting the hot stone (thread here). I was wondering if it was my switch to 100% organic King Arthur Artisan flour, or if my starter is getting too strong and acidic. I took the advice people here gave me about folding the dough more and paying attention to shaping better. So I did a test to see if the flour played a role or not, but also incorporated the advice given on folding, and I was careful to ferment them at about 70-75F rather then 80-85F as done earlier. To see if my flour switch played a role, I bought some regular King Arthur AP flour and made two batches of the Leonard loaf side by side, one batch with KA organic artisan flour and the other with the KA AP. I folded each batch 4 times, 30 minutes apart during the first bulk fermentation. I also carefully shaped each loaf into a tight boule, rested for 10 min., then placed in the bannetons, and I could not believe how high the loaves rose during the final proof, after only 3 hours:

I was in for even more surprise when I baked them - the oven spring was HUGE. Here are the loaves made with the King Arthur 100% organic artisan flour on the left (oval shape), and to the right are the ones made with the King Arthur AP flour (round shape). No discernable difference in the quality of the rise, oven spring, or crumb structure, they all came out excellent, and all because I paid a lot more attention to proper folding and shaping, and note that these were wet doughs:

I also retarded 2 of the loaves in the frig for about 6 hours before baking right out of the cold frig and into the hot oven, and got equally huge oven spring as for the ones I did not retard.

Here is the crumb shot of yet another batch a week later done by the same folding/shaping method, but using King Arthur organic whole wheat flour for 30% of the flour in the recipe (I have not been able to get that yin/yang symbol again in my bread that JMonkey likes though, ha!):

Conclusion of the experiment: My earlier overproofing problems were not due to the KA organic flour. It performed equally as well as the KA AP flour. The extra folding of the wet dough, and tighter shaping of the boules seemed to make all the difference, plus probably cooling the fermenting temps down to 70-75F I think helped. Thanks especially to gt and Bill Wraith for pointing out my lack of folding as being the main culprit. I've been having consistently great outcome with this recipe ever since.

I also made some sourdough spelt blueberry flaxseed muffins. These rose nice and high, but needed a little more sweetening and perhaps a bit more salt than my usual recipe calls for, probably because of the extra liquid and flour brought in by the sourdogh levain, otherwise they were quite nice. Somehwhat dense due to 100% spelt flour, including in the levain. The regular recipe for my muffins is here, but I modified it by expanding my regular batter white SD starter with 1 c. spelt flour and 1 c water (similar to how the King Arthur baking book makes a levain for sourdough waffles), which replaces the same amount of flour and liquid (oil) in the original recipe. Then followed the orginal recipe using baking soda rather then powder to get even more rise. Next time I will add a bit more oil, brown sugar, and salt:

pumpkinpapa's picture
pumpkinpapa

I really like the Multigrain Bread Extraordinaire or Struan from the BBA and have been modifying since I first made it with the hope of using sourdough as the main leavening, since Struan is an old Scottish bread I thought it would be good to have it all sourdough.

So with my Spelt starter in hand I changed the recipe once again:

My soaker was:

  • 2 Tbsp Organic Polenta
  • 1 Tbsp Organic red and white Quinoa
  • 3 Tbsp Organic steel cut oats
  • 2 Tbsp organic wheat bran
  • 1/4 cup room temp Kefir milk

Mixed the grains together in a small bowl and poured the Kefir over, then covered bowl and left on the table overnight. I really like the flavour of Kefir soaked grains.

My dough was:

  • 9 ounces organic hard flour
  • 4.5 ounces organic whole spelt flour
  • 1.5 ounces brown sugar
  • 1 1/2 Tsp sea salt
  • 3/4 Tbsp instant yeast
  • 3 Tbsp cooked organic brown rice
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp Buckwheat honey
  • 1/2 cup Kefir milk
  • 3 ounces Spelt starter
  • 2.5 ounces room temp water
  • handful of poppy seeds (Floyd, I now know your nightmares)

I mixed the flours, sugar, salt, and yeast in a large bowl and then added the soaker, rice, honey, Kefir, starter, and enough water to make the dough tacky. After it was well mixed, I transferred it to the counter where I kneaded it for 20 minutes until it passed the windowpane test, then I misted the top with some spray oil and covered it with plastic wrap.

I folded it once every half hour for the next 90 minutes at which point it had nicely doubled in size. Whereupon I placed it in my loaf pan, misted the surface with water and coated the loaf with poppy seeds. I sprayed the loaf with spray oil and covered it with plastic wrap and left it until the loaf had risen about 2 inches above the top of the pan, this took about 5 hours. I had left it to rise so high because I had a pork loin taking up the oven, but it worked out well just the same.

I baked the loaf at 350 F for 20 minutes and after turning 180 degrees I baked for another 20 minutes. The bread turned out nice and soft and with a good spring to the crumb. It was incredible toasted with either raw honey or my wife's strawberry jam.

This is after the first folds and rising (the picture is actually of 12 pounds of dough, not the 2 pound loaf stated above)

And the final loaf, or what is left of it. I actually did this recipe times five and I now have half of a free standing loaf remaining after making it on Thursday evening. This picture doesn't show it well but the loaf is 4 inches high.

Next time I will be going with less yeast and more starter and a mix of whole grains too.

Thegreenbaker's picture
Thegreenbaker

Woo! Hoo!

Referring back to my blog about not being able to make my bread rise..........well, it rose!

I adapted a recipe from BBA. I have been wanting to make Pane Siciliano but time wasnt permitting so I used the Anadama Bread recipe but didnt use the soker. I added 1 cup of fine semolina,

1 cup gluten flour and 2 1/2 cups of wholewheat flour (wholemeal) 2 teaspoons of yeast, salt, 2 TBSPN Barley Malt and about 2 1/2 cups of water.

 

I did this as I didnt have time to do the soker over night then then let the shaped dough rise in the fridge etc.

 

I had just about EVERYTHING crossed watching the dough rise much more strongly than it has before. I folded it let it rise again then cut it into two pieces and made a sandwich loaf out of one and a batard out of the other.

They still looked a bit dubious when I put them into the 500 degree oven (approx....it was 250 celcius-I'm in OZ) Well after a few times misting, I looked in to see my batard and grown about 20%. I squealed with such delight. I made My partner and 4 year old daughter come over to look.

When the baking was done, I put my Batard on the bread board and danced around with it.

My sandwich loaf rose higher than they ever have. And this is difficult as I dont have a proper loaf tin. It is very wide and has quite low sides compared to the loaf tins I have seen on this site. So I was quite chuffed at my success.

 

It was never my technique, it was my ingredients!

The crust is lovely, I had pretty holey crumb *bounces* The bread is a bit, chewy maybe, but I think I could stand to reduce the gluten flour and add a bit of fat to that recipe to soften it :)

 

I am soooo happy! *said with mouthful of vegemite toast*

 

thegreenbacker

Joe Fisher's picture
Joe Fisher

I ran myself right out of bread flour today :)

First we have some poppyseed "bloomers." Last time I followed the recipe to make one loaf and it was gigantic! This time I broke it in two.

 

To bring to dinner at my brother's house today, I made a pile of grissini. These are super easy to make and very tasty, what with the extra virgin olive oil and rosemary in them.

 

Then, of course, my old stand by. Rheinhart's NY Deli sourdough rye. Always a big favorite with those sautee'd onions and caraway in there. Soft as can be and twice as delicious :)

 

-Joe

 

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