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zainaba22's picture
zainaba22

Ulrike (Küchenlatein) will host BBD #03, and she is asking everyone to make a sourdough-leavened bread, preferably rye.

it is my first time baked bread with starter and rye , my bread came out great!

My first starter

756 g rye starter.

2 cups cup dried dates.

2 Tablespoon Anise seeds.

4 cups  white flour.

1 2\3 cups whole wheat flour.

1 2\3 cups rye flour.

2 2\3 cups water.

1 teaspoon salt.

2 Tablespoon olive oil.

1)In the bowl of mixer, mix the flours, dates, Anise seeds, water, and starter until just combined, about one minute.

2)Allow the dough to rest for 30 minutes.

3)Add the salt and oil and continue mixing about 4 minutes.

4)Cover and let rise for 1-2 hour.

5)Divide dough into 2 pieces.

6)With lightly floured hands, shape each piece into a rough oval.

7)Cover loaves loosely with plastic wrap and let rise for 1 hour.

8)Bake at 400 for 30-40 minutes.

zainab 

http://arabicbites.blogspot.com/










zolablue's picture
zolablue

Also known as Baguette aux lardons.

 

This is fabulous bread!  I baked it yesterday from Daniel Leader’s new book, Local Breads.  It is a very easy recipe, absolutely delicious fresh from the oven and today it made incredible toast.  The incorporation of slightly browned bacon and his recommendation to retard the shaped loaves overnight to infuse the dough with more of that great smoky bacon flavor is a winner.

 

His recipe calls for making four 316g baguettes but for some reason I only ended up with about 1100g total dough so I made 3 roughly 366g baguettes.  The dough was supple and slashed really well which I was concerned about with the bacon.  No problem though.

 

His method of using floured parchment and then making your own couche worked really well for this.  I was able to fit all three baguettes perfectly on a quarter-sheet restaurant style pan with rolled up dish cloths on each side to keep the loaves from spreading.  You make the troughs for the dough creasing the parchment between each loaf and then tuck the rolled cloths against them and the rim of the sheet pan. 

 

The next day I removed from the fridge and slid the entire thing onto the counter, took off the plastic wrap and covered with a cotton flour-sack towel.  I let them warm up and finish proofing for about 2 hours and then baked.  Even in my small oven all three loaves fit perfectly on my smaller-than-normal baking stone.  I steamed the oven and baked them about 25 minutes at 450°F and was really happy with the way they rose and actually grew ears.  (chuckle)  That is always welcome and always surprising for my breads, it seems but I’m getting better. 

 

I have not typed up this recipe yet.  I encourage you all to go buy Daniel Leader’s new book.  This is the first of his two books I have purchased so others are way ahead of me in the knowledge of his great breads and first book.  Mountaindog is lucky enough to live close to his bakery – wow!  That would be a treat.  So far in what I’ve read I’m very impressed with this book although since I use a firm starter I do have a couple thoughts that may differ from what his instructions are only by means of my own experience.  All in all it is a wonderful book and I’m thrilled to have it.  Can’t wait to try more new recipes.

Baguettes aux lardons

Great crisp crust and you can see how the bacon bits on the exterior crisp when baked. (yum)

Crumb was creamy with bacon infused throughout in little bits.  He doesn't show a photo of the crumb so I'm hoping this is how it is supposed to look.  He does have you beat the tar out of the dough and with a mixer it does break down the already small cooked pieces.  I didn't mind. :o)

zolablue's picture
zolablue

I'm posting this recipe for discussion as we have been talking about it on the Glezer firm starter thread.  I have made this bread often with variations because I did not have the high-extraction flour yet.  I recently purchased the Golden Buffalo flour from Heartland Mill in Kansas and it was superb.  I didn’t take photos of those so will next time I make it.

 

The one pictured here was made using Hodgson Mill WW graham flour sifted for the WW portion (250g) and mixed with the 750g King Arthur bread flour.  I’ve also made it sifting the King Arthur traditional and organic WW flours but I like the sweetness of the graham flour.  Still, I think after using that high-extraction flour the flavor was so extraordinary I would choose to make it that way more often.

 

Mountaindog has also posted her variation on this bread here and she makes beautiful loaves of it. 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/1806/thom-leonard-country-french-boule-recipe

This is a great recipe to play around with and it always comes out fabulous bread.  Another note – I generally like to make four smaller boules but when I made them with the high-extraction flour I made two boules and they were large and fantastic. 

 

Here are the some photos of the ones I made a few months ago (more photos here: http://zolablue.smugmug.com/gallery/2671417#141408937 ) and the recipe follows:

Thom Leonard’s Country French Bread - © Maggie Glezer, Artisan Baking  

Makes one 4 pound (1.8-kilo) loafTime: At least 18 hours with about 30 minutes of active work 

Much of what makes this bread so special is the high-extraction flour used in it.  This is a bolted whole-wheat flour much lighter in color and sweeter in flavor than a whole-wheat flour (at 100% extraction), but much darker and more flavorful than a white flour (at 72% extraction).

 

The method I give here for making your own high-extraction flour will work best on coarsely ground whole wheat flour.  If you already have a good high-extraction flour, substitute it for the whole-wheat and bread flour in the final recipe.  Thom also includes a little of his sourdough rye starter in the dough, but it is such a small amount that I have bumped up the levain slightly and added rye flour to the final dough instead.

RECIPE SYNOPSIS The evening before baking - making the Levain: 

25 grams (1 1/2 tablespoons or 0.8 oz) fermented firm sourdough starter refreshed 8 hrs before (17%)

140 grams (2/3 cup or 4.9 oz) water, lukewarm (100%)

140 grams (1 cup minus 1 tablespoon or 4.9 oz) unbleached bread flour (100%)

 

Dissolve the sourdough starter in the water in a small bowl.  Add the flour and beat this batter-like dough until very smooth. Place in a covered container and let it ferment overnight for 8 hours, or until fully risen and just starting to sink in the middle.

Bake Day – Mixing the Dough: 

350 grams (about 12 oz or about 2 1/2 cups) Coarsely ground whole-wheat flour, preferably milled from an organic, hard winter wheat (eventually 25%)

750 grams (26.5 oz or 5 cups) unbleached bread flour, preferably organic (75%)

30 grams (1 oz or 1/4 cup) organic whole-rye flour (3%)

660 grams (24 oz or 3 cups) water (66%)

Fermented levain (30%)

23 grams (0.8 oz or 1 tablespoon plus 1 1/2 teaspoons) salt (2.3%)

Preparing the flour: 

Sift the whole-wheat through your finest sieve or flour sifter.  The large flakes of bran should be caught in the sieve (use them for flouring your peel or for muffins).  Measure out 2 cups 3 tablespoons (8.8 ounces, 250 grams) sifted flour.  Mix this dark flour with the bread flour and the rye flour in a large bowl or in the work bowl of your mixer.

 

Add the water to the fermented levain to loosen it from the container.

  

Mixing the dough: 

By hand:  Pour the watered levain into the flours and stir with your hands or a wooden spoon just until a rough dough forms.  Turn the dough out onto the unfloured work surface and continue kneading until the dough is very smooth and shiny, about 10 minutes.  This is a lot of dough and will take some muscle.  Sprinkle on the salt and continue to knead the bread until the salt has fully dissolved and the dough is very smooth and shiny.

  

By stand mixer:  Add the watered levain to the flours in the work bowl and stir the dough together with a wooden spoon or your hand (this will make the mixing go more quickly).  Using the dough hook, mix the dough on medium speed for about 10 to 15 minutes, or until the dough is very smooth and almost cleans the bowl.  Add the salt and continue mixing until the dough is much tighter and cleans the bowl, about 5 more minutes.

This should be a soft, sticky, and extensible dough.  

Fermenting and turning the dough:  

Place the dough in a container at least 3 times its size and cover it tightly with plastic wrap. Let it ferment until it is airy and well expanded but not yet double in bulk, about 3 hours.  Turn the dough 3 times at 30-minute intervals, that is, after 30, 60, and 90 minutes of fermenting, then leave the dough undisturbed for the remaining time.

Rounding and resting the dough: 

Flour the surface of the dough and your work surface and turn the dough out.  Tuck the edges of the dough in to tighten it, round it, and cover it loosely with plastic wrap.  Let it rest until well relaxed, 10 to 15 minutes.  While the dough is resting, sift flour over a linen-lined basket or line a large colander with a well-floured tea towel.

Shaping and proofing the dough: 

Shape the dough into an even and tight round loaf without deflating it.  Place the dough topside down in a linen-lined basket or large colander, lightly sprinkle it with flour, and cover it well with plastic wrap.  Proof the dough until it is well expanded, about doubled in volume and remains indented when lightly pressed with a floured finger, after about 4 hours.

Preheating the oven: 

At least 45 minutes before the dough is fully proofed, arrange a rack on the oven’s second-to-top shelf and place a baking stone on it.  Clear away all racks above the one being used Preheat the oven to 450°F (230°C).

Baking the bread: 

If desired, just before baking the bread, fill the oven with steam.  Turn the bread out onto a sheet of parchment paper or a floured peel and slash 3 to 4 diagonal slashes and 3 to 4 horizontal slashes into the top.  It will look like a skewed grid with diamond-shaped openings.  Slide the bread, still on the paper, onto the hot stone and bake until the bread is dark and evenly browned all around and sounds hollow when thumped on the bottom, 70 to 80 minutes, rotating it halfway into the bake.  If the bread is browning too quickly, reduce the oven temperature to 400°F (205°C), but still bake the bread for at least 70 minutes.  Let the bread cool on a rack.

  

mbecktel's picture
mbecktel

My history with bread seems to hold steady. The focaccia did not turn out as planned. I milled the flour, mixed it and let it rise. It was a beautiful rise. \The instructions then said to punch down and pat out onto an oiled baking sheet. Did this, and dimpled the top, sprinked on parmesean cheese and a bit of sea salt. Nice looking out of the oven, but TOUGH!

Bob gamely ate some with olive oil and herbs with me. The cement in the gut feeling came back. Not for him. He loves bread in any way shape and form.

Okay, I apparently have trouble with massive amounts of insoluable fiber. As said earlier, I have found whole grain bread to be dry and bitter, so oatmeal was the fiber of choice. No probls with that, but this whole grain stuff...whew

the reason I chose the Nutrigrain mill was that it had a fine setting. Well, fine is still pretty gritty. And tho I did drink lots of water that day, that is not the answer to the problem. I guess I need to work up to it, so for now, I will bake with unbleached white flour, and add some e fresh ground wheat, eventually working up to substantial amounts.

To be honest, I really want to master the yeast thing first. I can give a rip about the jjello thing (gosh my 'puter won't even let me type the word!) but I am so frustrated about the bread baking thing. At least I am in the right place, eh?

Oh, and the dogs love the focaccia.

susanfnp's picture
susanfnp

If you love to bake rye sourdough, or, like me, are intimidated by it and need a kick in the pants to help you overcome that, you should enter BreadBaking Day #3. Come on, you know you want to...

I made this rye-ww sourdough, and it was actually fun.

 

Rye Whole Wheat Sourdough

Susanfnp

http://www.wildyeastblog.com

 

beenjamming's picture
beenjamming

So for the second time this summer, I moved this past weekend. I decided to given my oven a test run just to get a feel for it. First, I baked a bunch of 75% hydration rustic loaves with ~20% whole wheat. The dough was built on a 12 hr poolish. I usually don't use such a high percent of whole wheat flour and as a result the bread tasted a bit earthier than mine usual pain sur poolish. Oven performed well; it only got up to 450F, which was just enough.

 

I also baked a potato pizza,inspired by the Sullivan St potato pizza in Artisan baking, with some friends tonight. On top are some red creamer tots(salted, drained) sauteed with red onions in rosemary olive oil, roasted garlic and some montasio cheese. I got the crust exactly how I wanted it, but the topping combination could use a little work. I think I need to add either more potatoes or something creamy; with a hard cheese it tasted a bit too dry. It was still tasty enough for me to eat!

and the underside:

 

This weekend is looking pretty exciting as well. I have gotten some folks together here at Cornell to create an artisan baking club: Better Bread, Better World. A few of us know how to bake decently well, and a few are new to the game, but I'm very excited to get things off the ground.This weekend everyone is in town and we're going to get together and bake, eat and talk about our plan for this year. Hopefully by the spring we will have a stand at the Ithaca Farmer's Market to sell bread and donate the profits some where in Thompkins county. Have any of you taught others how to bake? I've shown a few curious friends how to make bread, and I like to start with challah because it can be made pretty easy and looks and tastes great, then start with a basic hearth loaf and move on. As kind of the leader of this club I think it's going to mostly on my shoulders to come up with things to do and if any ideas come to mind, please do share them!

mbecktel's picture
mbecktel

Okay, the say confession is good for the soul. I confess there are two foods that for some reason confound me. One is Jello. For love or money I can't make Jello. It's either unset, runny, hard as a rock, separating, or won't come out of the mold. Mom soon learned not to ask me ever to make it.

The other is yeast bread. Boy am I embarassed to write that on a forum like this. I have truly tried, at my mother's elbow, to learn. She made the best Slovak egg bread and nut rolls at the drop of the hat. And when I was working with her, I could too, but on my own, watch out! Hard as a rock, layered, collapsed, or ovepuffed and empty in the middle, you name it and I've produced it.

Of course I am letting myself in for a big project, trying to learn the right way to do it, with the additional variable of freshly milled flour. Me, who thinks most whole wheat bread I have ever tasted is bitter and dry. Well, ya gotta jump into the middle, I say. I got my new Nutrimill

 My new Nutrimill

                                  My Nutrimill

It was an adventure researching and buying it. However, there doesn't seem to be a lot out there on baking with it. One site says to allow extra time after mixing to let the bran absorb the liquid, but my main source doesn't. Also many recipes seem to be for a "Zo" breadmaking machine, whici is out of the budget right now. I did inherit a bread machine which my mother never used that can do 100% whole wheat bread, so I tried that.

I used the recipe in the machine book for 100% whole wheat and put it through its paces. this is my first loaf:

My first loaf

                                                       My first loaf

It came out pretty well. Nice even crumb, was fairly moist and didn't taste bitter. On the other hand, it was pretty dense, and much browner than i anticipated. My husband thought it was okay, and he is the bread muncher of the family. The half piece I had sat on my gut like a piece of cement. Am I not drinking enough water? Do I have to give in to conventional wisdom and use half unbleached white flour to lighten it up? We'll have to experiment.

Right now I mixed up a batch of focaccia dough in the machine and am letting it rise. This was an interesting recipe as it had a lot of flavorings in the dough. Will provide a picture of it if it turns out well in the next post.

Today, got an interesing post in the Mercola newsletter (http://www.mercola.com). He pulls in all kinds of health (mainly anti-mainstream) articles then comments on them. I am not ready to buy everything he says, but there are some things you can find that are worth exploring. The one article I found striking was on Genetically Modified Food. It seems that when fed GM food, test animals are developing reproductive and digestive problems. It is a long URL so follow this tiny one: http://tinyurl.com/ysop35 He also provides a link to the Institute of Responsible Technology. That is an interesting site to look around: (http://www.responsibletechnology.org/)

Well, gotta go play with my focaccia. Will let you all know how things turn out!

 

Jamila's picture
Jamila

Spinach & Veggie Stuffed Snail

 

Spinach Snail #2Spinach Stuffed Snail

 

 

Green Stuffed Olives & Cream Cheese

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Jamila's picture
Jamila

Sourdough Blueberry PancakesSourdough Blueberry Pancakes #2Blueberry Sourdough Pancakes #3

Thanks for all the help at The Fresh Loaf! Now I can make my favorite pancakes anytime I like. :-) 

mbecktel's picture
mbecktel

Well, I finally did it. For a long while now, I have been growing highly suspect of the foods around us. It just seemed like there was too much convenience, and many of us just didn't seem to be getting any healthier. Then I saw the movie The Future of Food (it's on Netflix) and that got me going on frankenfoods, you know, genetically modified foods that hold farmers ransom and put genes of different things where they are not supposed to be. My mother just died of ischemic bowels, which means the arteries to her digestive system were totally blocked. It is the same as a heart attack, but kills your intestines (painfully - like angina of the gut). She had been eating healthy by conventional standards since she beat lymphoma 20 some years ago. My dad died of prostate cancer, even though he never passed up a plate of spaghetti or tomato sauce on anything. So much for the lycopene connection. And my younger sister died of cancer three years ago at age 49, and it started in her lung, spread to her brain, then suddenly after being biopsied, found it spread everywhere, even though the original cancer was supposed to be slow spreading. Yes, she did smoke, but never had a smoker's cough (I sure did when I smoked) and could run up two flights of stairs and not be winded. She ate healthy foods all the time.

With a background like this, I started to delve into the not-so-mainstream literature for all those hints I had been picking up on what is and is not healthy according to conventional wisdom powered by the agribusiness and pharmasutical factions, and what science was unearthing. This is a fascinating journey. My bible is Real Food by Nina Planck (http://www.ninaplanck.com/)

White bread and refined sugar are the antichrist, and refined salt is no saint either. Seems that industry likes to reduce everything to its base elements, take the parts and sell them at a premium, then replace some of the things lost by artificial means and tout them as good for you. And when it is not, and despite your best efforts you have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, anemia, and fat, there are PILLS for that. (don't say much of anything about the side effects tho...)

On the other side of the coin, there are those who say to go back to the natural. I have already witnessed the miracles that homeopathics can do (but there's no money in them so it appears the FDA is being paid to find ways to supress them and other natural cures and healthy things). I have learned a lot, and so I am embarking on a journey back to REAL FOOD.

I have purchased a Nutrimill and grains from a place called BreadBeckers (http://www.breadbeckers.com/). They also have a co-op that periodically delivers nearby. I am going to make my own bread becasue I hate commercial whole wheat bread - it tastes dry and bitter to me. I am hoping that this forum will help me develop the talent to make interesting and delicious breads that are healthy for us.

I also have discovered they have started a CSA farm nearby (that's Community Sustainable Agriculture). (for more info see http://www.localharvest.org/) The way is works is you buy a share of the farm for a season. And you live and die with the fate of the farm. They are successful? You get loads of fresh healthily grown veggies and eggs every week. Bad weather? Growing problems? You also share the hardships. And then we found out our farm was going to divide grass fed cattle. The bottom line is that we can get totally naturally raised beef, high in omega three and other goodies, for about $2.50/lb. Can't beat it! And our farmer made a connections so we only have to invest in half a half, so we can realistically store it (and afford it).

Raw milk is another pursuit. (http://www.realmilk.com/) We have some leads on some, tho it is sold only for animal consumption in Florida (sort of a wink,wink, nudge,nudge, knowhwatImean affair). We may have to settle for vat pasturized, but non-homogenized.

And coconut oil. (http://www.coconutresearchcenter.org/) I am amazed how nice virgin coconut oil tastes. Am sampling several sources.

Sounds like I am going back to my hippie days (no I never lived on a commune or even went vegetarian), but I intend to see if I can make healthy choices according to this new/old wisdom, and then see if I really do feel better, lose weight, and overall become a better person. We'll keep you posted

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