The Fresh Loaf

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nmygarden's picture
nmygarden

I chose to focus on the moon, pretty much to the exclusion of the sun (no rules). And my inspiration - what do we all know the moon is made of? Green Cheese. Okay, so most anything resembling real green cheese may not seem so appetizing... then what would be? Pesto! Basil, garlic, pine nuts, parmesan - we have all those. Cool. A multigrain dough with a little whole wheat, about 25% whole rye, bread flour, salt, water, and a couple tablespoons of olive oil. Shaped as a crescent moon and filled with green cheesy pesto. Voila!

Valentinaa's picture
Valentinaa

Pane incamiciato literally means "a bread in a shirt" and it always comes off looking quite spectacular. I have been meaning to bake this bread for a while now, but have been somewhat taken aback from making the "shirt" for the bread. I have also wanted to make a bread made of semolina (fine flour made of durum wheat) for some time after coming back from Sicily (with a ton of flour in my luggage), so there goes nothing I said yesterday.

First, I have prepared a stiff levain from my liquid (100%) one as follows:

Stiff levain

Wt (g)

Bread flour

120

Water

60

Liquid starter

80

Total

280

 

 

1. The starter is dissolved into the water and then the flours are added and mixed thoroughly. I used my hands to make sure all the flour is incorporated properly.

2. Leave to rest for 4-6 hours or until it triples in volume.

 

Final dough

Bakers' %

Wt (g)

for 1 kg

Strong white wheat flour

25

200

Fine durum wheat flour (semolina)

75

600

Water

68.75

550

Salt

2.37

19

Stiff levain

35

280

Total

206

1649

 

3. Mix the flours with the water and leave to autolyse for 30 minutes. Add in the stiff levain and salt and mix thoroughly until all the flour is incorporated and the gluten is moderately developed (window pane test). 

4. Bulk fermentation: 2:30 hrs with SF after each 30 minutes

5. Cut two small balls of dough (I made two loaves) and stretch them on a floured surface using a rolling pin

6. Pre-shape the two loaves and leave to rest for 15 minutes.

7. Using a brush, put some olive oil on top of the rolled out dough and add whatever seeds you wish to add (I used black and golden sesame)

8. After the dough has rested, place it in the middle of the dough sheet and „dress” the loaf

6. Place the the loaves in well floured bannetons and keep them refrigerated for 10-12 hours

7. Remove from fridge and score carefully to only cut through the "shirt" and not the loaf itself

8. bake at 230 C for 20 minutes and at 210 C for a further 20 minutes (15 minutes with steam, last 25 dry)

8. Open the oven door and leave the loaves to rest in the cooling oven for 5 minutes more

10. Remove the loaves from oven and carefully take out the works of art.

I actually ended up feeling sorry that I have to cut this up and eat it. :)

Enjoy!

kendalm's picture
kendalm

Baked 13 canele today (pastis flavored ... Yyyyyyummm) and noticed for whatever reason really nice crumb structure. A quick point for anyone delving into this pastry - crumb can sometimes come out more like a custard often times near the bottom - if you take a close look at the sliced sacrificial one here it's evident that the entire inside is slightly bubbly resembling bread and this is sort of the objective however some bakes I do don't always look like this and resemble sense custard near the bottom. I have no idea why this happens but the interesting thing today is this bake is a 6 hour refridgeration of the batter as opposed to the recommended 12 (and for some zealots 24 to 36 hours). So point being is that it's a bit of a mystery as to why some recommend such long periods of refridgeration - in his dudes kitchen it looks like 6 might do a better job or that this is just a fluke. Whatever the case I feel a duty to the tfl community to post these observations and hope that others can have a fun binge on a little pyramid of these delicious morsels of goodness. With that is BOOMSHANKA and off to finish these off ...

will slick's picture
will slick

https://goodcookingfortheheartandsoul.blogspot.com/2017/08/yesterday-my-bride-was-going-to-be-out.html -  Follow this link for the full pictorial guide. 

I was looking for a nice pie recipe and came across this old post. 

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/19545/apple-pie-dream-pie-crust-realized

I followed evth, pretty much verbatim. With only a few changes. I used "only" three sticks of butter in the pastry and apple cider vinegar instead of champagne vinegar. For the filling I used tapioca flour, instead of corn starch. 

I am busting, this is the best pie I ever made! Like evth said, the dough rolled out ridiculously easy. The filling was straight forward. 

I have not cut into it yet, waiting for my wife to get home. However the smell and look of this is out of this world! The pastry is very flaky. The only fail, I made a mess fluting the crust. Next time I will do better. All and all now that its done, it does not look to bad. Smile.

 

 

 

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

Along with my play-time (the Eclipse experiments), I also needed a basic sandwich loaf for the week.  We've had hot, dry weather, bringing on the need for an early harvest, so not much time at home right now and a need for much portable food!

For our sandwiches this week, I wanted to use up the last of my older durum and kamut berries (since I had stocked up again), use up the rest of the rye levain that I had built, and keep it fairly high in whole grains. 

This dough is a joy to work with, and all went according to original plan of 2 hour autolyse, 2-1/2 hours of mixing and room temp fermentation with stretch and folds, and then 15 hours in the fridge.  It was pre-shaped straight from the fridge, rested for 1 hour, shaped, then proofed for 2 hours before baking at 450 deg covered for 25 minutes / 425 degrees uncovered for 25 minutes.

 

INGREDIENT

AMOUNT (g)

FLOUR TOTAL (g)

% WATER

WATER (g)

BAKER'S %

LEVAIN

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Rye

70

70

 

 

11.18

Water

56

 

 

56.00

8.95

DOUGH

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Durum

203

203

 

 

32.43

Fresh Milled Kamut

155

155

 

 

24.76

Salt

12

 

 

 

1.92

All Purpose Flour

198

198

 

 

31.63

Water

353

 

 

353.00

56.39

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Dough Weight

1047

 

 

 

167.25

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

 

626

 

 

100.00

Total Water (Hydration)

 

 

 

409.00

65.34

 

Since it is fairly low hydration, and I firmly de-gassed it during shaping, it came out with my ideal sandwich crumb, and a lovely delicate yellow tinge from the durum / kamut mix.

 

The best part about it is that it got a “good bread” review from the husband – which is the highest praise from him. 

 Getting ready to make up some sandwiches looked a bit like "day and night", and we really enjoyed having the variety in the flavours

The sandwich loaf is done, but I got to finish up the last of the "night" loaf with breakfast this morning (topped with some cream cheese and the awesome prune-butter from Hanseata's blog: http://hanseata.blogspot.ca/2015/02/ex-pats-pflaumenmus-ersatz-plum-butter.html)

No time for baking this week, so I'm awfully glad that the freezer still has some stock from past bakes. 

Bon appétit and keep baking happy!

IceDemeter's picture
IceDemeter

  With Mini Oven’s Eclipse Bread challenge in mind, and the need to get my “mother” durum starter built back up, I started last week by pulling out 10g each of my 65% hydration rye and durum starters and starting with 3-stage levain builds, getting them both up to 80% hydration, and shooting for about 270g total of each levain.

 The rye (which had the “mother’ re-built the previous week) was more than perky, and had doubled less than 3 hours after the first feed.  The durum showed its age, and just barely doubled in 8 hours – definitely time for the “mother” to be built back up!

 The first loaf that I thought of to go with the Eclipse Challenge would be my “darkness” impression.  I wanted a really moist and dark bread, heavy on the rye, but still enough of a “white” bread that my husband would enjoy it, too (he’s not as much of a fan of the dark stuff as I am).  For the moistness and darkness, I decided on a porridge with lots of chocolate rye malt, and I used a mix of dark brewed coffee and Earl Grey tea for the liquid (an accidental mixture made by my husband helpfully saving some left-over coffee for me to have as iced coffee --- but adding it in to the container in the fridge that I used for left-over tea).  I added in some sour cream and mashed bananas to keep the whole thing very soft, and just a touch of millet to be the “stars” in the darkness.

 It is still far too warm here (was 30 deg C that day), and this dough ended up as dementedly sticky.  It actually got worse as it fermented, so for the first time ever I ended up adding a bit more flour (75g total) and doing 300 slap-and-folds to incorporate it about 2 hours in to the ferment. 

 That was still not enough to make it shape-able, so I bunged it in to a heavily buttered tin. 

 

INGREDIENT

AMOUNT (g)

FLOUR TOTAL (g)

% WATER

WATER (g)

BAKER'S %

LEVAIN

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Rye

75

75

 

 

11.72

Water

60

 

 

60.00

9.38

TOASTED ADDERS

 

 

 

 

 

Rye Flakes

20

20

 

 

3.13

Millet

10

10

 

 

1.56

Oat Bran

10

10

 

 

1.56

Wheat Germ

10

10

 

 

1.56

Chocolate Rye Malt

10

10

 

 

1.56

PORRIDGE (made w/ toasties)

 

 

 

 

Full Fat Sour Cream

60

 

74.5

44.70

9.38

Coffee / Tea mix

120

 

77

92.40

18.75

DOUGH

 

 

 

 

 

Dark Rye

168

168

 

 

26.25

Bananas

260

 

74.9

194.74

40.63

Chocolate Rye Malt

5

5

 

 

0.78

Salt

12

 

 

 

1.88

All Purpose Flour

332

332

 

 

51.88

Coffee / Tea mix

73

 

 

73.00

11.41

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Dough Weight

1225

 

 

 

191.41

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

 

640

 

 

100.00

Total Water (Hydration)

 

 

 

464.84

72.63

 

While it was a devilish dough to work with, the result is moist and tender and delicious --- so worth it!

The next part of the bake was also intended for the Eclipse challenge --- a bright and sunny yellow dough (durum mixed with corn flour and a cornmeal porridge) with a streak of blueberry raspberry “moon shadow” running through it.

 Well – I had intended on doing 100% whole grain, but the dough just didn’t want to hold together after I added the levain.  I just didn't have enough "dough" to hold the amount of cornmeal porridge, so I ended up grabbing a couple of hundred grams of the already mixed dough from our sandwich loaf and incorporating it in order to get some kind of cohesion.  That did help, but the dough stayed really soft throughout fermentation, and didn’t seem to want to hold together after being flattened and rolled around the fillings.  I proofed it on a parchment covered baking sheet, covered with a damp towel, and tossed it in to the oven quite under-proofed in the hope that it would stay together. 

 

INGREDIENT

AMOUNT (g)

FLOUR TOTAL (g)

% WATER

WATER (g)

BAKER'S %

LEVAIN

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Durum

100

100

 

 

19.46

Water

80

 

 

80.00

15.56

TOASTED ADDERS

 

 

 

 

 

yellow cornmeal

45

45

 

 

8.75

PORRIDGE (made w/ toasties)

 

 

 

 

Full Fat Sour Cream

60

 

74.5

44.70

11.67

Dry Skim Milk Powder

30

 

 

 

5.84

Water

120

 

50

60.00

23.35

DOUGH

 

 

 

 

 

Fresh Milled Durum

217

217

 

 

42.22

Fresh Milled Kamut

40

40

 

 

7.78

Fresh Milled Corn flour

60

60

 

 

11.67

Salt

11

 

 

 

2.14

All Purpose Flour

52

52

 

 

10.12

Water

161

 

 

161.00

31.32

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Dough Weight

976

 

 

 

189.88

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

 

514

 

 

100.00

Total Water (Hydration)

 

 

 

345.70

67.26

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lemon Cream Spread

 

 

 

 

 

Lemon Curd

35

 

 

 

6.81

Cream Cheese

65

 

 

 

12.65

Confectioners Sugar

17

 

 

 

3.31

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Spread

117

 

 

 

22.76

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blueberry / Apple Raspberry Compote

 

 

 

 

Frozen blueberries

300

 

 

 

58.37

Raspberry Applesauce

113

 

 

 

21.98

Cornstarch

28

 

 

 

5.45

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Fruit Compote

441

 

 

 

85.80

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Weight (pre-bake)

1534

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Well, it’s not pretty, but it is tasty --- and it did work out with the banana rye for the look that I had in mind for the Eclipse Challenge.

Bon appétit and keep baking happy!

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

Having managed to create two yeast waters, from plums and apples in my own garden, it was time to try them out to make some bread.

I built each of them into a starter with two builds, adding roughly 50 grams of yeast water and 50 grams of bread flour in each build. The apple yeast water was amazing (the one on the left in the photo at the top of the post); the plum yeast water not so much but still doubled within about 6 or 7 hours. Both smelled simply wonderful - clean, fruity and yeasty with a touch of alcohol.

First I made some small sandwich / burger buns with the apple yeast water. I used about 25% Red Fife flour and added some rehydrated minced onion but didn't want to add too much of anything so I could experience the flavour of the bread with the yeast water. I was a bit surprised at the dough, given the activity in the starter; it didn't seem to rise very quickly or much. I ended up popping it in the fridge overnight because it hadn't shown much activity after several hours at room temperature. In the morning it was still sort of clay-like so I left it on the counter for a few more hours, then shaped it. It was nice, soft and elastic but not very light or puffy. I shaped it into buns, flattened them and pressed sesame seeds into the top.

Once baked, the thing that struck me was the pale colour. Very unlike most of my bakes, though they were certainly done inside. Decent oven spring but not huge.

Crumb was a bit dense but decent. The DH says "good bun!" so I guess they pass, but not one of my best bakes.

Yesterday I used the plum yeast water to make some currant buns. I used the recipe from this page for Dutch Currant buns, with a couple of changes. I used the yeast water starter to replace part of the milk and flour, and left out the dry yeast. I also used an egg substitute (ground flax seeds mixed with water) as I wanted to try this out anyway.

Once again, the dough didn't rise much and felt very dense, even after 5 or 6 hours. I shaped the buns last night and put them in the fridge. Not much change this morning, so after letting them sit out for a couple of hours I popped them in the oven.

Once again, little oven spring and a very pale colour. The crumb is dense, but the buns do taste good!

So, I'll continue to test this out. I like the idea of having a source of wild yeast that doesn't have the sour taste of sourdough starter. Perhaps it needs different timing, or a tiny bit of dry yeast for a booster.

 

joc1954's picture
joc1954

This bread was inspired by a nmygarden comment (Thanks Cathy for your comment!!!!) to my Elderberry and Hokkaido squash bread.

I wanted to be a little bit more innovative with this bread. I knew I need to make a black dough which was kind of a mental reservation for me, but then I accepted this idea and got 20 g of black color made from charcoal.

 

 

I wanted to cut the boule parallel to the bottom to get a nice black spot in the middle and yellow corona surrounding that. Finally I decided to make a "traditional" cut but not cut the crust on the bottom and then just open the bread and show the crumb what you see on the video.

 

The rest was easy - yellow color comes from Hokkaido squash puree, shaping was traditional with small exception that I just wrapped the upper part of the boule with yellow dough, but left the bottom part uncovered so I got picture of first solar eclipse right after putting the dough into banneton.

I think the rest is obvious from the pictures.

 

Happy baking!

Joze

joc1954's picture
joc1954

This bread is really a little bit unusual. I used sourdough colored with charcoal to simulate obscuration and Hokkaido squash to simulate the sun's corona.

The dough during the bake expanded much more than anticipated due to intensive fermentation in the bottom part which was warming up slowly due to the squash collar. I created an opening in the bottom of squash to get more even heat transfer and also to get another "solar eclipse" from the bottom side of the loaf.

 

I think I don't need to explain more as pictures are self explanatory.

First two movies:

 

 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

This month Mini Oven challenged us fellow Fresh Loafers to create a special bread to commemorate the upcoming total eclipse of the sun. Spurred by astronomic ambitions I began to ponder how to go about this.

Just a new bread? Where was the connection to the total eclipse?

A two-toned dough? Once I baked a marbled rye bread and found its taste rather underwhelming.

Squid ink as a black dye? Not my cup of tea!

So it had to be a two-toned decoration. Black and white sesame seeds are in my pantry. Only a suitable recipe was missing. It couldn't be a loaf whose oven-spring would tear and destroy any decorative topping.

The answer was a flat bread that would spread more than rise.

I found a good starting point in Austrian baker Dietmar Kappl's Fladenbrot, tweaking it to suit my needs: with a long, cold bulk fermentation and the introduction of a little whole grain flour (I tried it with rye and emmer - both tasted great).

To emulate the eclipse I needed a ring-shaped utensil to press the outline of the moon into the dough. A large yogurt tub had just the right diameter (11.5 cm/4.5 inches).

We were so happy with my crusty, nutty flat bread that I baked it again, two days later, for my customers at the natural food store that sells my breads.

To see the recipe and pictures of the process, please visit my blog "Brot & Bread".

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