The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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Floydm's picture
Floydm

By the way, a week or so ago I added a new email notification feature that I think is really handy.  If you go to:


My Account >> Edit >> Email Preferences


and check the box and save you can get a notification any time someone replies to a thread you've started.  I'm finding this a great way of keeping track of responses to blog entries I made weeks or months ago that otherwise I'd miss.


That bring up to 3 the types of email notifications you can have here.  The other two are "Notifications," which sends you a digest of all of the days activity by email, and "Subscriptions," which allow you to subscribe to all updates on a given thread or content type.  Having of these options is quite confusing, I recognize.  Every time I think about doing away with one type of notification or the other to make things simpler I talk to someone who says they really like getting that type.  So I'm not certain what to do, long-term, but it is worth experimenting with the different types of notifications to find the one that fits your reading habits best.

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I wrote a blog entry on MercyCorps.org today about The Fresh Loaf Fall Fundraiser that some folks here might enjoy reading.  Fingers crossed, hopefully some other online communities and groups will use what we did as a model and hold similar drives from time-to-time.   


Again, thank you to everyone who participated and/or showed your support.

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

I was inspired by Eric's medieval bread and wanted to try something different with Hamelman's oatbread. I ended up with a medieval bread/Pain de Beaucaire hybrid... I first shaped two baguettes of the oatbread dough. The two vertical sides of the baguettes were brushed with water, and the outer edge dipped in rolled oats. The inner side was partly sprinkled with coarse rye flour, and the baguettes shaped as below:


Oatbread


The idea was to sprinkle coarse flour on the inner side to avoid the dough proofing/baking together. Also, avoid sprinkling flour on the very ends: You want some wet dough on each side so you can splice them together in the end.


Here's the baked loaves/baguettes:


Oatbread


Lots of flavourful crust, and it's fun to try something different :)


Oatbread

Salome's picture
Salome

Finally... I've done it again. I must confess that I didn't get to baking very often in the last couple weeks. Of course I tried to bake every now and then, but most of the times just well known formulae like my potato-walnut-bread, or a simple white bread such as Hamelman's rustic bread, or something comparable.


I found it rather hard to fit the  baking into my schedule, as my days differ considerably and I always find myself busy when I'd like to bake.


But yesterday I realized that baking, even in the time expensive way I like and enjoy, can fit into my schedule. No miracles, it's rather simple: Sourdough in the morning, mixing in the early evening, first fermentation, shaping in the later evening and final proof in my not so cold fridge and then baking in the next morning before I head to the uni. (it was probably slightly to much proofed, but it didn't matter to much and now I know that I'd simply have to lower the fridge temperature for the next time and it should be perfect!)


The result is very pleasing! (excuse the not so good picture quality, my camera broke some time ago and as I'm not at home I can't borrow my sister's camera. Thus, the pictures are somewhat blurry and pale in colour)


 



The bread is pleasantly sour, due to the potatoes very "humid" and chewy. I was surprised to find out that it tastes pretty much like the bread I always wanted to copy from my favourite baker but I never managed to get such a moist crumb!As I'm not very familiar with my new oven yet, it charred on the bottom somewhat and I had to scrape some black off, but I really liked this smoky note in combination with the sourness!


 


Potatoe - rye bread


---------------------


Sourdough:


100 g whole rye flour


100 g water


35 g mature culture


 


final dough:


all of the sourdough


280 g boiled and peeled potatoes, cooled (I boiled them while I mixed the sourdough)


150 g whole wheat flour


200 g bread flour


200 g water


12 g vital wheat gluten


10 g salt


1 tsp (somewhat less) instant yeast


 


1. prepare the sourdough in the morning


2. in the evening: mix the sourdough, the mashed potatoes, all of the flour, vwgluten and the water and knead until everything is smooth.


3. autolyse for some time, approx. 30 min.


4. add salt and yeast, knead until smooth and well developed.


5. proove until doubled in size (I put the dough on the balcony (12°C) while I left the house and brought it back inside after I returned to let it double fully, it took me about four hours, I think)


6. shape (I divided the dough into two pieces and made boules out of them)


7. place them in a well floured linnen inside of a bowl (or proofing basket, If you got one) and let the boules ferment over night in the fridge


8. preheat the oven the next morning to full temperature, slash the boules, steam well, turn down to 230°C and bake for approx. 35 min.


9. let cool and enjoy!


 


i hope you all are doing fine. Even if I didn't write, I've checked in here regularily and followed your baking!


Salome


 

turosdolci's picture
turosdolci


The preparation of the “Torta di Biscotto di Nozze” is by far one of the most important jobs of all in Italian weddings. Members of the family prepare biscotti for weeks for that important day. Layers of different biscotti are arranged in a pyramid and decorated with icing covered with "Confetti" and ribbons - it sits in a place of honor on the main table.



http://turosdolci.wordpress.com/2009/08/14/a-wedding-biscotti-caketorta-di-biscotto-di-nozze/





txfarmer's picture
txfarmer


The picture above shows the 5th Horst Bandel Pumpernickel I made, and the last 4 were made within the span of a month, yes, I am just a tad "obsessive". :P


 


I've posted twicehere before asking about this recipe. Other than the first time, where I over-corrected the "too wet" problem and made the dough too dry, the other times the bread actually tasted fine. When I posted pictures last time, the kind people here even said it looked perfect for an authentic German pumpernickel. There's only ONE problem, the bread did not rise to the top to fill the pullman pan. No matter how much water I put in, how much I knead/not knead, how long/short I let it rise, the finish loaf was ALWAYS 0.5inch below the lid. Even though it tasted great, the smell was heavenly, and the crumb was just the right moisture, I just couldn't rest until it rose to the top! Finally, I noticed that my pan was 4X4X13, while Hamelman's was 3.75X3.75X13, it's such a tiny difference, I never thought it was a big deal. Then I got desperate and calculated the volume difference, wow, it's exactly 1/2inch below my pan!!!


So for this last time, I adjusted all the ingredients, and made 110% of the recipe, guess what?! It filled the top and came out perfectly square!



After 36 hours of resting, sliced thin:



 


Yummy with smoked salmon



Phew, finally I can stop baking this bread every Sunday, which taks up the oven space for the whole day (17 hours)! I love eating it, but I think I am just a tad relieved that I can take a break from it for a bit. :P



For those who like heavy dark rye breads, this one is a must try, it's in the "Bread" book by Hamelman. Super yummy, and really not THAT difficult to make, as long as you add enoug water, my dough was plenty wet, so wet that I couldn't really lift the column into the pan, I had to dump it in. I was pretty stingy with the soaking water for the old bread, and used probably 95% of the water in the final dough. Oh yeah, it helps to make sure that your pan size is correct if you are obsessed about the shape like me.BTW, I didn't have blackstrap molasses so I skipped it as instructed in the recipe, that's why the bread is not that dark.


cmckinley's picture
cmckinley

I cannot find malted barely flour anywhere!  I have seen it in grain form, I guess I could just mill it?  Anyways I am in Seattle if anybody knows where to get some already milled let me know!


 


I am happy to say that Cliff's in Caldwell, Idaho does carry malted barley flour! Yay for localism!!

chouette22's picture
chouette22

After many months, I have baked loaves from straight dough again, besides my pretty regular Zopf. I had refreshed my starters on Friday, but then the weekend presented itself in a way that I just couldn't keep up with a lengthy sourdough schedule, so in the fridge they went again, unused.


Yesterday, on Sunday, I made a "Pan de los muertos," a sweet and enriched bread traditionally baked on November 1st and 2nd in Mexico. One of our neighbors is from Mexico, but nor he nor his wife (who is American) have ever tried to bake this bread, thus to say thank you for so many little neighborly services, I made them a loaf (and one for ourselves). My yeast wasn't behaving properly and during fermentation, the dough hardly rose (I wasn't entirely sure if it was the yeast or the heavy buttery and eggy dough). However, it still turned out pretty well, and the taste was fabulous. The recipe called for orange blossom water and since I didn't have that, I added a little bit of rose syrup (something my Indian husband cannot live without). Result: the dough turned slightly red-orange (really pretty) and the flavor, also from the zest of a lemon, was simply amazing.



The top represents a skull and the sides are bones...


Today, while working from home, I looked through "Bread" in search of straight recipes and ended up trying the Semolina Bread with a Soaker (without the fennel seeds, p. 244) and the Five-Grain Bread (p. 238). I halved both recipes, thus producing only one loaf of each. My only changes to the recipes: I added 100g of discard sourdough starter to each (plus a little extra salt, since I increased the dough amount), thinking if nothing else, it might add some flavor.



For the durum flour called for in the recipe I used chapati flour (also called atta flour) that we still have from my mother-in-law's visit this past summer. It is a type of whole wheat flour made from durum wheat, high in protein, yellow in color. I just don't know if this is the same as what is used in semolina breads (despite researching it); anyhow it turned out pretty well and is very tasty.



Five-grain bread


Both of them were easy to make while grading online speaking assignments and papers.


Last week I needed to use up some plums (the very last of the season) and baked this rustic tart. I just love these fruit tarts, so quickly made and so tasty, not too sweet, just wonderful. Now I always add 1/3 to ½ cup of corn flour to my dough (pâte brisée), recommended by my French friend Sophie - I really like the extra crunch this produces.


weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

I made JoeVa's sourdough with Durum Flour and while very tasty there are more holes than crumb. Anyone know why? I followed his formula but added 1 TBLS. vital wheat gluten because I was using all purpose flour with the durum and thought the AP might need a boost. When I took it out of the fridge this morning it looked ready to bake so as soon as the oven was ready I put one in then baked the other when the first came out. This photo is of the second loaf. The crumb was not as open on the first but almost. You can see I did not get the lift that Joe got. Like I said, the taste was very good.


I plan to do this again soon using higluten flour and I just might bulk ferment the dough overnight and stretch/fold and shape/bake the net day.


 


GIOVANNI'S SD


 


weavershouse

granywolf's picture
granywolf

I am a diabetic. Would love to bake whole wheat bread with fewer carbs. Is there a low carb flour that I can mix with my whole wheat flour.

What do bakeries use to make low carb bread?
any hel[p would be appreciated

granywolf@orofino-id.com

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