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Shiao-Ping's picture
Shiao-Ping

Have you ever used shop-bought bread pre-mixes to make sourdoughs?  I have several unfinished bread mixes at home from those days when I used bread machine to make pan breads; they are all reaching their use-by dates and I really don't want to waste them. 


The Multigrain Bread Mix I have is soy (10%) and linseed (5%), whole rye, maize polenta, in addition to unbleached wheat flour.  It has many "dough conditioners" added in: ascorbic acid, enzyme, emulsifier, etc., to assure of its performance.  And the salt (2.4%) has also been added in.  The box says its protein is 12.6%.  All that you need to add is water and yeast, and way you to.  For a home sourdough there is nothing wrong with using it (I am not concerned with my label!).


This is how my multigrain bread-mix sourdough has turned out:


 


          


 


                                                           


                                                                                                        


My formula 



  • 700 g mature white starter @75% hydration (ie, 300 water + 400 g flour)

  • 700 g Australia's Laucke Multigrain Bread Mix

  • 8 g salt (for the flour portion of the starter)

  • 492 g water


Total dough weight 1900 g and total dough hydration 72% 


                    



  1. Mix by hand

  2. Autolyse 30 minutes

  3. Bulk fermentation 3 hours with 5 folds every 30 minutes

  4. Proof for one hour

  5. Retard in refrigerator for 14 hours

  6. Bake with steam as usual


 


                                   


       


                            


 


Using bread pre-mixes to make sourdough is quite a fool-proof way to make a nice tasting bread. 


Shiao-Ping

mcs's picture
mcs

Callie (calliekoch) came from Fort Collins, Colorado to the Back Home Bakery last week (Sept 5-13) for her one week internship.  Although new to sourdoughs, Callie's been baking and cooking for a while, and it showed in her meticulous work and attention to detail.



striking a pose while sheeting puff-pastry dough


 




Apfelstrudel, shaping Buckwheat Flax boule, croissants, finished Buckwheat Flax loaves

I'm sure you'll agree everything looks absolutely perfect!

Thanks for all of the help Callie, hope to see you again up here.


-Mark


http://TheBackHomeBakery.com


 

maixner's picture
maixner

This is my very first post!  I received a note that the 2009 Food Blog Awards are open.  I love The Fresh Loaf and think it would win best community blog but I don't know anything about the Food Blog Awards.


http://www.foodbuzz.com/blogs/1408216-nominations-for-the-2009-food-blog-awards-are-open-

mariacuellar's picture
mariacuellar

Hello Fresh Loaf!


I'm writing to invite everyone here to read my blog! I am a beginner artisan home baker, and I've been learning by myself through books, youtube videos, and experience. I have been doing some research with several famous baking books and I'll be posting my reviews for them. Check it out! mariasgoldenoven.blogspot.com. I'll soon write more substantial posts here as well.


I love this community!

loafgirl's picture
loafgirl

So I started baking about a year ago.  Everything I did turned out surprisingly wonderful.  From my sourdough to my soft pretzels, I hardly ever had issues with any step of the baking process.  Then we remodeled our kitchen.  Since then, I have had no luck with anything.  It's like my dough never firms up.  I find myself adding more flour, and yet it's always falling apart and worthless. I couldn't even produce pizza dough the other night for our guests.  My specialty (mostly for my husband and family) has always been my soft pretzels, and I couldn't even make those tonight.  After letting the dough rise it was like a hot sticky mess that I couldn't even work with.  I am tired of spending hours on crap.  I wasted 3 days on 4 sourdough loaves over this weekend and it kills me.   HELP!!!!!  What gives?  I am so frustrated I am seriously thinking of giving up the only hobby that I have and love.  Please help me.  Is it the water?  We now have a RO (reverse osmosis) system since we have well water (although I always used bottled before).  I have been using a lot more Organic flour because some of my goods (if I can ever get them right) will be for a local Organic restaurant in town.  Is it that?  If so, I will reconsider my chance to sell my bread.  I don't get it!  I have done nothing different than what I used to do and I cannot make anything. 


Loafgirl is ready to retire after 11 months.

koloatree's picture
koloatree

just some pics from yesterdays bake. next time, i will do the second proof longer, increase hydration slightly, and reread scoring tutorial. not sure why the other side didnt get spring. maybe i didnt score deep enough? 




 


higher hydration



 

Kuret's picture
Kuret

Seeing as rye breads are all over this place nowdays I decided to share some loaves I have baked the last weeks. First up is the 80% rye with soaker from Bread. This bread is really great! I made two of these 850g breads and they lasted a week each, with some saved in the freezer for the next time I make the Horst bandel black pumpernickel.


This is how one of the loaves looked when ready for cutting. A little overfoured I have to admit..


          


I am really fond of the cracks that appear when you make properly proofed rye breads. When I cut the loaves open I found a much more open crumb than what I am used to when handling this kind of high percentage rye, to me the crumb looks more like a 60% rye than an 80%. This combined with a robust rye flavor made for great open face sandwiches with cream cheese and chives. Who whould say no to that?


           80% rye crumb


I also baked some "american pumpernickel", I do not really know what classifies a bread as pumpernickel though. This loaf is a 40%rye made with finely ground rye flour with some ground up caraway and fennel added, the color is homemade caramel coloring. The tomato is a tomato..


          


          

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

 


Today's sourdough bread is a continuation of the experiment from last week with my modified steaming method of pouring hot water over pre-heated lava rocks in a cast iron skillet both before and after loading the loaves in the oven.


I had two new goals: In addition to trying to replicate last weeks good results, I wanted to increase the sourness of the bread and I wanted to see if I could get a “crackly” crust.


In the interest of increased sourness, I elaborated a firmer levain than what I customarily use. I fed the levain two days before mixing the dough, fermented it overnight and then refrigerated it for 18 hours. I also doubled the percentage of the levain in the formula.


I have read that lower protein flour will produce a more crackly crust, while higher protein flour produces a more crunchy, harder crust. Therefore, I used AP flour (11.7% protein) rather than the high-gluten flour (14.2% protein) I had used last week.


Since I was using a lower protein flour, I reduced the hydration of the dough to 70%. Note that the effective hydration is even a bit lower, since the levain was less hydrated also. I used the same procedures as last week except I baked the loaves slightly longer, since they were slightly larger (because of the additional levain).



 


Ingredients

Amount

Baker's percentage

Giusto's Baker's Choice flour

450 gms

90

Whole rye flour

50 gms

10

Water

350 gms

70

Salt

10 gms

2

Levain (50% hydration)

200 gms

40

Total

972 gms

212

Procedures

  1. Mix the flours and water to a shaggy mass. Cover and let rest for 20-60 minutes.

  2. Add the salt and levain and mix to moderate gluten development.

  3. Transfer to the bench and do a couple of folds, then transfer the dough to an oiled bowl and cover it. Note the volume the dough will achieve when doubled.

  4. After 45 minutes, do another stretch and fold, then allow the dough to double in volume.

  5. Divide the dough into two equal pieces and pre-shape into rounds. Let the pieces rest, covered, for 10-20 minutes.

  6. Shape each piece into a boule and transfer to well-floured bannetons, seam side up. Place each in a food-grade plastic bag, seal the openings.

  7. Allow to proof for 30-60 minutes (less in a warmer environment), then refrigerate for 8-14 hours.

  8. Remove the loaves from the refrigerator 2-4 hours before baking (depending on how risen they are and how warm the room is). Allow to warm up and expand to 1.5 times the loaves original volume.

  9. 45-60 minutes before baking, pre-heat the oven to 500F with a baking stone on the middle shelf and a cast iron skillet filled with lava rocks on the bottom shelf. (I suggest moving the stone ove to within one inch of the oven wall on your non-dominant side. Place the skillet next to the wall on your dominant side.)

  10. When the loaves are ready to bake, pour 1/3 cup of boiling water over the lava rocks and close the oven door fast. (Strongly suggest holding the kettle wearing an oven mitt!)

  11. Transfer the loaves to a peel or to parchment paper on a peel, and load them onto your baking stone.

  12. Immediately pour ½ cup of boiling water over the lava stones and quickly close the oven door.

  13. Turn the oven temperature down to 460F and set a timer for 12 minutes.

  14. After 12 minutes, remove the skillet. Reset the timer for 20 minutes.

  15. The loaves are done when nicely colored, thumping their bottoms gives a “hollow” sound and their internal temperature is at least 205F.

  16. When the loaves are done, turn off the oven but leave the loaves in the oven with the door ajar for 7-10 minutes to dry the crust.

  17. Cool thoroughly (2 hours) before slicing and serving.

Comments:

I autolysed the flours and water for about 30 minutes. I then added the levain and salt and mixed with the paddle in my KitchenAid for about 2 minutes. As I was switching to the dough hook, I was surprised how much gluten development had already occurred. I mixed with dough with the dough hook at Speed 2 for just a couple minutes more and already had moderate gluten development.

To what could I attribute this? The only possibilities were the increased percentage of levain and the different flour. My hypothesis is it was mostly the flour. We hear that higher-gluten flours require more mixing to develop the gluten. I was using a lower gluten flour than usual for this type of bread.

The dough consistency (Thank you, MC for this useful distinction from the SFBI!) was almost identical to that of last week's dough, so my guesstimated hydration adjustment seemed spot on.

These boules were proofed for a bit over an hour before they were refrigerated. The next morning, they sat at room temperature for about 2 hours before baking. When I transferred them to the peel, they spread some. This could be because of the lower gluten flour effects, slight over-proofing or a combination of factors.

The loaves had reasonable but not great oven spring, and they had less bloom than the previous bake. This suggests they were probably over-proofed a bit. I baked them for 22 minutes at 460F. They then sat in the turned off oven for 7 minutes to dry the crust.

The crust was not as shiny as the last ones, but by no means “dull.” They were singing already when I took them out of the oven. It seemed to me, that the “tune” was higher pitched than the song my boules generally sing. Could this be because of the lower gluten flour? Thinner crust? And … Woohoo! Cracks began to appear in the crust as the bread cooled!

The crust has a crunchy bite. As can be seen from the crumb shot, below, it is relatively thick. I think that, to get a thin  crackly crust like a classic baguette, one must have a shorter bake at a lower temperature.

The crumb appearance was typical for my sourdoughs of this type. However, it was chewier than I expected. Very nice. The flavor was indeed more sour than last week's sourdough, as expected. I would still categorize it as mild to moderate sourness. It is not as sour as the "San Francisco Sourdough" in Reinhart's "Crust and Crumb," which uses an extremely firm levain in even higher proportions.

 

Conclusions:

  • Increased sour flavor with firmer levain and increased levain percentage: As expected, this loaf was more sour but not dramatically so. To get a super-sour flavor, the techniques used must be pushed further.
  • Crackled crust with lower protein flour: Today's bake seems to support this hypothesis. Is this effect desirable? That's a matter of taste, but, for me, it's at least nice to know how to get the effect when I want it.
  • The benefits of the double steaming technique: Today's results were certainly satisfactory, but they also demonstrate that steaming is just one among several variables that contribute to oven spring and bloom.

 

David

Submitted to Yeast Spotting

 

 

Muffin Man's picture
Muffin Man

   A of years ago, I was browsing in Barnes and Noble, looking for nothing in particular, when I came upon Daniel Leader's "Bread alone".  It looked interesting as it was more than just a collection of recipes.  I bought it and was hooked by bread.  I read and consumed the book and, since there sere as yet no other books by him, I expanded my horizons to include, again in no particular order, Maggie Glezer, Peter Reinhart (I'm eagerly awaiting his newest), Nancy silverton, Jeffrey Hammelman, Carol Field, Beth Hensperger, Joe Ortiz, Laurel Robertson, Ruth Levy Barenbaum, and the good folks at King Arthur.  I have learned from each and enjoyed their different perspectives and approaches.  To thhink that simple wheat, yeast, and water could produce so many different and delightful flavors - it bogglesd the mind.  I have learned to make a variety of tasty breads and have a side business going at work supplying muffins to my coworkers.  Since their support aids and abets y hobby, I charge, basically, only my costs.  A very gracious friend, a retired graphic artist made me the caricature which I use on all of my recipes and as a part of my signature block  I felt I had arrived when my wife ceded the pantry to me and got me a small freezer in which I may keep flours not yet used and various berries for my muffins.  On a recent visit from our daughter, i realized how focused (my wife says obsessed) I have become when she took our grandkids into the kitchen and rearranged grandpa's pantry.  i love them anyway and rearranged things back the way they should be.  I feel that I could come into the kitchen and make biscuits without turning on a light - yeah, I'm that organized.  But only with my baking... the rest of my life is as disorganized as anyone else.  Thank you for reading.  In the immortal words fo the Governor of California: I'll be back.

Shiao-Ping's picture
Shiao-Ping

Very soon it will be Celtic New Year (see my Van Morrison post).   It doesn't mean anything to me except that here in Australia spring is in full swing, spring is the season for new growth and that's what you get after New Year .  Here in Brisbane Hong Kong Orchid trees are towards the end of their flowering season; when their flowers have all fallen, Jacaranda will be in full bloom.  I put on my joggers, went around my neighborhood and took these photos of Hong Kong Orchid trees:


                           


Yesterday while I was watering my husband's baby avocado tree in the backyard, in amongst Polly our dog's droppings, I saw little bell shaped purple flowers; I lifted my head and was surprised to see one of our jacarandas is showing the new season's color.  Very soon my one and only surviving rose bush will be blooming, and when all the jacaranda flowers have fallen, roses will be in full bloom.


I'd like to celebrate spring by this Ancient Grains Sourdough (anticlimax?).  Safa, our instructor at Artisan I, SFBI, once told us he made a 7 x 7 sourdough, which has 7% Teff flour and 7% spelt flour.  He calls it 7 x 7 because it is easier to remember.  He said a small percentage of Teff flour gives a pleasing sweetness to the bread.  Teff is the smallest grain in the world and compared to other grains, it has a much larger percentage of bran and germ.  My idea of this Ancient Grains Sourdough indirectly came from him.  I added buckwheat flour which I bought from Ferry Building in San Francisco last month, together wiith Teff flour.  The whole grain buckwheat is ground into flour with little black specks that come from the ground seed hull.  This is how traditional buckwheat flour has been made for hundreds of years.  All three grains are considered "ancient grains."  


I noticed the dough seemed to be quite "volatile" as there were a lot of bubbles happening at very early stage of the fermentation.  There must be more enzymes in the dough because of the bran and germ from the whole grain ancient flours than just plain white flour.  I ended up doing more stretch & folds with this dough to try and slow down the enzymatic activity.   And here is my Ancient Grains Sourdough (Sourdough 7 x 7 x 7):


 


       


                                                             


                                                                  


 


Formula for My Ancient Grains Sourdough


For a description of Chad Robertson's method as decribed in Daniel wing and Alan Scott's The Bread builder, please see  my previous post.


Two nights before bake day - first stage of levain build-up



  • 62 g starter @ 75% hydration

  • 124 g bread flour (i.e. two times starter amount for me; I do not know what ratio Chad Robertson uses.)

  • 94 g water


Mix and ferment for 6 - 8 hours at 18C / 65 F (depending on your room temperature, you may need shorter or longer fermentation time for your starter to mature)


The morning before bake day - second (and final) stage of levain expansion



  • 280 g starter @ 75% hydration (all from above)

  • 280 g bread flour (I use one time starter amount in flour but I do not know what amount Chad Robertson uses)

  • 210 g water


Mix and ferment for two hours only.


Formula for final dough



  • 770 g starter (all from above)

  • 770 g bread flour

  • 54 g spelt whole meal flour (7% of bread flour)

  • 54 g whole grain buckwheat flour (7% of bread flour)

  • 54 g whole grain Teff flour (7% of bread flour)

  • 630g water

  • 25 g salt

  • Extra rice flour and bread flour mixture for dusting


Total dough weight 2.35 kg and total dough hydration 70%



  1. In a big bowl, first put in water then put in the starter. Break up the starter thoroughly in the water with your hands.

  2. Add all ingredients and stir with a wooden spoon to combine for 1 - 2 minutes.  (Take down the time when this is done; this will be your start time for calculating the 4 hour bulk fermentation.  Starting from this time, your dough is fermenting. The preferred room temperature is 18 - 21C / 65 - 70F. You may need to adjust your dough temperature by using cooler or warmer water.)

  3. Autolyse 20 - 30 minutes

  4. Start the first set of stretch and folds in the bowl by grabbing the edge of the dough with one hand and fold to the centre onto itself (10 - 20 times) while rotating the bowl with the other hand as you go. The hand folding serves as mixing. As you stretch and fold, try not to tear the dough; only stretch as far as it can go.

  5. After 30 minutes, do the second set of stretch and folds. You will see that this dough is very easy to work with and the fermentation seems to be under way quite nicely as there will be some bubbles already forming in the dough. At the end of the folds, the dough will feel silky and smooth and almost leave the side of the mixing bowl. (The dough appears to be quite "volatile." Because of the activity that seems to be taking place inside the dough, I made a mental note to come back to it for the next set of stretch and folds very soon.)

  6. When you fold, be mindful that the bottom of the dough is the right side of the dough; and the right side of the dough always remains at the bottom in the bowl.   *See note below.

  7. After another 30 minutes, do the third set of stretch and folds. You will see that the dough is very active in that there seems to be a lot of fermentation already going on as the dough feels quite bubbly and has expanded quite a lot by the time you do the third S & F's. (So right there and then you know that more stretch & folds will be necessary to slow down their activity.)

  8. After another 30 minutes, repeat the stretch & folds. 

  9. After another 60 minutes, do the fifth set of stretch & folds.

  10. After another 30 minutes (that will be the end of the 4 hour bulk fermentation and the start of the 2 hour proofing), pre-shape the dough to a very tight ball as follows: First sprinkle some flour on your work bench and some flour at the edge of the dough (ie, in between where the dough meets the bowl); scrape the dough out onto the bench, trying as much as you can to land the right side of the dough (which is at the bottom) onto the floured bench. Gather the sides of the dough to the centre, flip the whole thing over (so now the right side is on the top) and pre-shape to a tight ball. You will see that the dough is very wobbly and after 10 minutes resting on the bench, it will have completely spread out. I decided to do another pre-shape. I flipped it over, gather the sides to the centre, flipped it over again, then shaped it tight again.

  11. Dust your linen-lined basket or banneton with a mixture of bread and rice flours.

  12. After another 10 minutes resting, shape the dough and place it into your basket for proofing. Cover.

  13. My room temperature is 18 - 21C / 65 - 70F; if your room temperature is cooler or warmer than that, adjust your proofing time accordingly.

  14. At the end of the 2 hour proofing, place the dough into the refrigerator for retarding (minimum for 8 hours; I retarded mine for 16 hours).


* Note on the right side of the dough:  Since I started doing what I thought was Chad Robertson's sourdough procedure by hand, I recalled an incident during my Artisan III class.  My team had  members who worked in commercial bakeries and one day, towards the end of our first speed mixing for a dough, a team member switched the spiral mixer to the reverse gear to try to pick up some dough stuck on the side of the wall.  Our instructor saw it and told us never to do that; he said that you can do reverse gear only at the beginning of the mixing process when the ingredients are still being incorporated.  The reasoning is:  once the gluten structure has started to form in a certain direction, it is not advisable to do anything to alter or disrupt that direction.   Therefore, my thinking is when I am hand-mixing and folding the dough, I want to keep that "direction" in tact.


Bake Day



  1. Bake the boules cold (ie, straight out of the refrigerator). Just before baking, sift flour on the dough and score it or stencil it any way you like. Once the dough is loaded onto the baking stone, steam the oven with 1 cup of boiling hot water.

  2. Bake at 220C / 430F for 30 minutes, then turn the oven down to 200C /390F (or higher if you wish for a darker crust) and bake for another 25 - 30 minutes.

  3. Cool completely before slicing.


      


       The dough spreads out enormously and fills my whole baking stone (measuring 34 cm x 34 cm)


       with a little bit hanging out on the side of the stone.


This is an unusual sourdough.  It is quite sour (medium strength sourness) even though I used the same starter as for my other Chad Robertson sourdough.  I can only surmise that it is because of the ancient whole grain flours that I used here.  The enzymes in the flours must have sped up the fermentation process quite a lot such that the dough was far more fermented than that other sourdough I made, hence more sourness.  The sourness is more of an acidic, rather than lactic, acidity.  


 


                    


                                            


The texture is very different from that other sourdough, too.  The texture of sourdough made from white bread flour is normally tender, whereas this one is quite "robust," as if the crumb has "strength" when you bite into it and is quite chewy.  The comparison is a bit like the difference between red wine made with shiraz (syrah) grapes (very "robust") and other red wine made with merlot or cabernet sauvignon (more "mellow").  It is very moist just the same. 


I couldn't taste the sweetness that Safa mentioned of Teff flour but it has a very interesting nutty flavor.  


The crumb is very open, as open as what I can hope for.  As the dough had a lot of enzymatic activity during fermentation and spread out enormously (not keeping its shape), I wonder if cutting down the hydration to say 67% would make it more manageable and at the same time not hurt its open structure.


Chinese collects stones or rocks which show formations of nature.  My uncle Chang has a rock which looks like a mountain.


 


                                  


         My bread mountain                                 Bread mountain -other view 1                 Bread mountain - other view 2


 


                                                             


                                                                 This ancient grains sourdough is delicious.


Shiao-Ping

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