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dorothy62's picture
dorothy62

Hozzávalók:

3 dkg élesztő
3 dl tej
1 szem citrompótló összetörve
2 ek. kr.cukor
40 dkg finomliszt
10 dkg rétesliszt
1 egész tojás
1 tojássárgája
8 dkg olvasztott vaj
1 tojássárga és 1 ek.porcukor a kenéshez
Töltelék:
Nagyon egyszerű 25 dkg darált mák és 20 dkg kr.cukor elkeverve







Egy dl tejben kis liszttel és pici cukorral kelesztjük meg az élesztőt. A lisztet kimérjük és sorban beledolgozzuk a hozzávalókat. A vajat (margarint) a legvégén adjuk hozzá, és alaposan meggyúrjuk. Kelesztés 1 órán át, langyos helyen, majd a tésztát kétfele vesszük kinyújtjuk, és megtöltjük a mákkal. Óvatosan feltekergetjük tepsire helyezzük és újabb 30 percet kelesztjük langyos helyen. Sütés előtt megkenjük a porcukorral elkevert tojássárgájával. Közepesen meleg előmelegített sütőben kb 45 perc alatt elkészül.



Jó tudni:


A lisztet érdemes szitálni, mert közben oxigént visz magával a tálba és szebben fog megkelni a tészta. Amibe olvasztott zsíradék kell, ott  a liszt 20 %-át réteslisztre kell cserélni. A citrompótlóban lévő aszkorbin miatt marad puha a sütemény napokig, ajánlott minden élesztős tésztába. Kelesztés dagasztógép nélkül:a a sütőt 5 percre begyújtjuk és elzárjuk, majd a tésztástálat egy kendőbe tekerve betesszük,  a hő a kelesztés végéig kitart. A porcukros tojástól lesz ropogós barna a mákos külseje.


more:  http://izrobbanas.freeblog.hu/categories/pekseg/

dorothy62's picture
dorothy62

 


Hozzávalók:


66 dkg liszt


10 dkg rétesliszt


350 ml tej


125 ml étolaj


1 zacskó szárított élesztő+2 dkg élesztő kelesztve


2 tojás felverve


1 evőkanál cukor


1 evőkanál őrölt kömény


2,5 dkg só


Az összeállításhoz:


5dkg olvasztott vaj, szezámmag, lenmag



Összegyúrjuk, az olajat a végén tesszük bele,  25 percig kelesztjük. A sütőt begyújtjuk és 160 cfokra állítjuk.


A tésztát kétfelé vesszük és az első feléből 5 db 22 cm átmérőjű körlapot nyújtunk. Egyenesen a tepsibe tesszük, a lapokat egymásra helyezés közben megkenjük olvasztott vajjal, (ecsettel). Középről indulva nyolc felé vágjuk pizzavágóval, úgy, hogy a szélénél egy cm mélységig egyben hagyjuk és a szeleteket kihajtjuk a tészta szélére.


A második fél tésztának a negyedét levágjuk,ez lesz a buci a virág közepén, a maradékot 5 felé vágjuk, nyújtjuk ,14 cm átmérőjű lapokra és amikor egyberaktuk beletesszük a tepsibe a kör közepére. Úgy vágjuk be, hogy a szirmok a külső szirmok közé essenek, majd beletesszük a bucit  közepére.


Tej-tojás keverékkel megkenjük, szárítjuk-kelesztjük, újrakenjük és megszórjuk szezámmaggal, lenmaggal. Betesszük a meleg sütőbe, 15 -20 perc múlva kicsit feljebb vesszük a lángot, hogy szépen megpiruljon a teteje.


more: http://izrobbanas.freeblog.hu/categories/kenyer/


 


How to make:             


http://gourmandine.ro/aluaturi-sarate/paine-floarea-soarelui/


 

ilan's picture
ilan

Hi there all the bread lovers.


I'm Ilan, I work in the Hi-Tech industry for the last 10 years which means that I have very little time for myself or my family during the week.


For the last few years, I find comfort in the kitchen, cooking for me, my wife and our extended family. It became a therapy for me - after a long week of work I prefer to cook for 10 people instead of having a good weekend rest.


Bread fascinated me for a long time and about two year ago, I started to bake my own bread.


At first, it came out very bitter and not soft or crunchy but we ate it any way. Very few things can compare with home made bread, hot and fresh out of the oven.


Trying to get better at baking bread, I turned to web. There I discovered the importance of kneading the dough for longer time , the importance of long rising and letting it rise again after shaping, scoring and more.


The quality of the bread improve dramatically and the variety of the loaves increased.


 


All of this time I continued cooking and about 6 months ago I went to a cooking school. Beside improving my cooking skills, I had long chats with my teaching Chef about many issues, bread included. He strongly recommended this website and I'm glad he did.


As a good student, I decided to start from the beginning and go through the lessons here.


I found out that most of the bread loaves I baked so far, resembled the most to the loaf in lesson 2 ( http://www.thefreshloaf.com/lessons/addingmore ) although i haven't used this much milk in a bread before, I took the exact recipe and went for it.


I messed up with the scoring on this one, but all in all, the result was very pleasing:



 



 


After two years of baking bread (on the weekends) I just started to realize how rich is this world.


It looks like I found one of my favorites places in the web.

Smita's picture
Smita


Notes:


- Used my 100% hydration starter.


- Two builds to reach 8 oz active starter. The starter smelled fruity, not sour. Bubbles about half a centimeter big.


- Final dough: 2 cups whole wheat flour (365 from Whole Foods) and under 1 cup AP flour (King Arthur), 1 tsp wheat gluten. 


- For DDT of 76 degrees, added 1.5 cups water at about 90 degrees.


- 30 minute autolyse. Kneaded till windowpane.


- 45 minute rise, stretch and fold, 60 minute rise.


- Shaped into boule, plopped into floured banneton. Overnight retard (10 hours).


- Baked at 450 in Le Cruset (15 mins), turned oven down to 440 (20 mins), lid off (10 mins). Total = 45 mins.


- Internal temperature = 200 degrees.


 


Results:


- Lovely crumb and crust. We like this a lot, in terms of flavor and whole wheat flour content.


- My goal is to be able to make this consistently, and also get better at shaping.


- I would also like to introduce diastatic malt and see if I can decrease the AP flour. Need to do some reading from Hamelman's Bread in preparation.


- All comments and feedback welcome!

Smita's picture
Smita


Easily the best non-sourdough loaf I have ever made. Followed instructions to the letter.


What surprised me the most was how incredibly light the loaf was. Very good for morning toast. Best within 3-4 days. Thank you Peter Reinhart and BBA!


 

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Just recently, Mariana-Aga, a fellow baker who I have great respect for and who is an occasional poster here, presented a very interesting paper with extensive photos on the development of gluten. For the purposes of her research and documentation she used a food processor to mix and develop, then over develop the dough. All of the various stages are carefully documented and you can see the tell tale signs of the dough being over worked and ruined.


 This experiment shows what over kneading will do to your dough. It is also possible to over develop your dough by simply over fermenting it, either at room temperature or in the refrigerator. We have all had a dough turn slack and sticky from not being attended to in the proper time.In fact unless you use a food processor, it is very hard to mechanically over develop or over mix your dough at home. The mixers most home bakers use are not capable of over mixing unless you take a long nap while mixing.


If you don't learn anything more from this great post other than to finally know that there is no fixing it if you get in this situation. I have tried adding more flour to the extreme, and it never works. You may as well resign yourself that this will never be right and toss it in the compost.


If you have seen this, you know what I'm talking about!


And finally, I learned a nice trick for cleaning that unbelievably sticky gooey dough mess from my bowls and hands. This alone is reason enough to visit this very informative blog post by Mariana.. I hope some of you find it as interesting as I have.


Eric


PS: This page is written in Russian. Google Translate had no trouble translating to English.

Zeb's picture
Zeb

I hope this is ok to do this as I can't find the posts I wanted to add these too as I am new here.  Yesterday I made these breads, a yeasted dough cottage loaf, following Elizabeth David's method (first time I have ever baked a loaf from a cold start!)  and the pain de sielge d'auvergne, I think its lineage goes as follows, Daniel Leader, LeadDog and Mick of Bethesdabakers, thank you all for this recipe -  and my usual Pain de Campagne.  


Anyway I wanted to share the photos with you. The rye burst at the side because I wasn't sure whether or not to slash the top, obviously I should have done.


Sun shining here in Bristol!  all the best Zeb (on the internet nobody knows you're a dog!)





Zeb's picture
Zeb

I hope this is ok to do this as I can't find the posts I wanted to add these too as I am new here.  Yesterday I made these breads, a yeasted dough cottage loaf, following Elizabeth David's method (first time I have ever baked a loaf from a cold start!)  and the pain de sielge d'auvergne, I think its lineage goes as follows, Daniel Leader, LeadDog and Mick of Bethesdabakers, thank you all for this recipe -  and my usual Pain de Campagne.  


 


Anyway I wanted to share the photos with you. The rye burst at the side because I wasn't sure whether or not to slash the top, obviously I should have done.


Sun shining here in Bristol!  all the best Zeb (on the internet nobody knows you're a dog!)





bnom's picture
bnom

Today, finally, I got some bloomin ears!  


I've been playing with Susan (Wild Yeast) Norwich Sourdough and Floyd's San Joaquin sourdough on this site. I found the first too firm and sour, the second too slack and not sour enough, so I worked out my own formula...a happy marriage between the two.  And lo and behold---ears for the first time ever (in a dough not cooked in a dutch oven).  As it happens, I donated the bread for a friend's dinner party so no crumb shots.


I'm not sure what made the difference...it could be that I added about 200 gram Gold Medal AP to the Morbread AP I usually use.



The formula:


300 g firm starter


620 g water


730 g unbleached AP flour (530 g Morbread, and 200 g Gold Medal)


120 g dark rye flour


23 g salt


 


 


 


 

davidg618's picture
davidg618

When I started this quest to improve my baking skills, about one year ago, my goals weren't very specific. "Get better at bread baking" was about the best I could do. And "find help" was about as refined as I could codify my approach. Fortunately, I stumbled upon The Fresh Loaf early in my search for that help. I feel I've come a long way in that one year. TFL's members and guests are my inspriation, the helping hand I reach to first, the friends who share my best looking loaves and worst mistakes. I also search far-afield, but my roots are here, still shallow, but growing.


Moreover, I hadn't given a thought beyond, "We'll eat them." to wondering what I'd do with the products of my quest. Since then I've made many more loaves than just the two of us could consume (without becoming well-bloomed, and "doughy" ourselves). I started taking my bread (the best looking loaves) to neighborhood potlucks--our community does a lot of them.  I shared other extras (the second-best-looking loaves) with select neighbors and friends. In the following months, the numbers of loaves shared and neighbors and friends in receipt grew. At Christmas I mailed sourdough loaves, Priority Mail, to select family who whould be honest with me if the bread arrived stale, or was not to their liking. This year i"ll gift loaves to all the family, and some far-distant friends. I'm relied on by neighborhood potluck hosts to bring bread.


Perhaps, the best early advice I received from TFLer's was "Pick a recipe, and practice, practice, practice, and...practice." To date, I'm confident I've got a basic sourdough bread and baguette formulae I trust my new skills to produce reliably and consistently, although I'm still working on shaping and scoring. At the moment, I bake each of them every week or ten days, and I'm working on a third: Jewish Rye. I've shared one loaf, so far, with a close, trusted couple; they rushed out and bought pastrami.


"Practice, practice, practice" has become my mantra.


I've got a slightly more specific goal now, "Build a repertoire of breads I can reliably and consistently produce.". I've got 2 and 1/2  so far. I have more than enough people eager for the output. (Yvonne and I will eat the worse-looking loaves, and the outright mistakes.) I'm havin' fun!


And I can now succinctly state how I might reach that goal: practice, practice, practice.


David G


 

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