The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

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Floydm's picture
Floydm

The server upgrade this week went very well.  There have been a few little hiccups, but overall it went well, and the site is blisteringly fast now.


There are still a few missing features.  Most noticable, the gallery is gone.  The gallery solution I was using isn't mature enough to run in this version of Drupal.  I'll either reenable that gallery software when it gets stable or find a new gallery.


There also were a few other things I was hoping to add that I did not.  One thing has has been mentioned is a private messaging system, so that site users could send each other their email addresses and discussing things privately.  Again, the PM module isn't mature enough right now, but I will try to add that in soon.  Now that we are on Drupal 6, we have a lot more new modules available to us.


One module that is mature is the book module, so I think we'll try to kick off a "Baker's Handbook" project very soon, like by the start of December.  It has been... a year since we first talked about doing that?  Maybe more?  Anyway, it is definitely time.  Worst case, it doesn't work out.  Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

While I was waiting for the quilt store to open this morning I wandered into the local thrift store and found yet another baking book: "The Neighborhood Bakeshop" by Jill Van Cleeve. It has "recipes and reminiscences of America's favorite bakery treats" and has a little write-up of each bakery along with the featured recipe. Looks like a good read even if I don't bake from it, A.

Stephanie Brim's picture
Stephanie Brim

It's been a bit since I've baked. Bread has been bought at our house lately, which I'm not that happy with, and therefore I figured I should get in gear again. I wanted a bread that was relatively low fuss, so I decided on a reduced amount of yeast in a normal, slightly wetter dough.

I started with 2 cups of flour, 1/4 teaspoon of yeast, and 1 cup water. Those were mixed and left in my oven for 5 hours. By this time the mass had tripled and was looking quite good. I mixed in 1/2 cup more water and 1.5 teaspoons salt, then flour 1/2 a cup at a time until I came to the right consistency for me...ended up being about 3.75 cups. It was a rather wet, sticky mass. I kneaded it in the bowl until it formed itself into something vaguely resembling a ball and stashed it in my refrigerator until morning. Woke up, took it out, let it come to room temperature. Once there, I shaped the dough into as nice a ball as I could manage and placed it into a bowl bottom up. I let that double. Baked at 425 for 20 minutes covered, and then 10 minutes uncovered, until the middle reached 200 degrees. I think it needed a little longer in the oven, but it turned out pretty well.

Photo of the 20 hour bread, whole loaf

Photo of the 20 hour bread, close-up of crack

Photo of the 20 hour bread, crumb

I think the next time I make this I'll not do a preferment at all. I really don't think it changed anything. I'll just mix up the ingredients, knead for a little while, and then stash in the fridge for a long fermentation. It'll probably turn this into 36 hour bread, but that's quite fine with me if the results are this tasty.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

 Lot's of big bubbles under the sauce.SylviaPizza Margarita: Lot's of big bubbles under the sauce.Sylvia Hey who say's a pizza has to be round!!  I used P.R. recipe for Neo-Neopolitan Pizza from his book "American Pie" and my own sauce recipe using my favorite canned crushed tomatoes for the base...Henry's Market's own brand.  Since I had one frozen crust and sauce left I cooked this pizza indoors....my wood-fired oven makes fantastic pizza...but the ones indoors can be really fantastic tasting.  I'm not sure how to post all picture in on the same page...so I apologize. SylviaPizza: Hey who say's a pizza has to be round!!  I used P.R. recipe for Neo-Neopolitan Pizza from his book "American Pie" and my own sauce recipe using my favorite canned crushed tomatoes for the base...Henry's Market's own brand.  Since I had one frozen crust and sauce left I cooked this pizza indoors....my wood-fired oven makes fantastic pizza...but the ones indoors can be really fantastic tasting.  I'm not sure how to post all picture in on the same page...so I apologize.  I'am just finding out how to post images in my Blog... Sylvia

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

I have a confession to make: I've never eaten bagels before. Somehow these dense, naughty creatures have escaped me. Well, until now, that is. I'm not sure what triggered my curiosity; it's probably a toss-up between the exotically low hydration levels in the bagel dough, and the recent US presidential election. Anyways. I leafed through Hamelman's Bread, and found a bagel recipe that looked bulletproof. This is a dough with 58% hydration (I did have a hard time getting the dough together in one piece at first), that I let ferment in the fridge overnight, shaped in the morning, and then proof in the fridge while I was at work today. When I got home this afternoon, I put some malted barley syrup into a huge kettle of boiling water, and let these chewy monsters soak for about a minute (boy did they puff up...), before they were left to cool in ice water for a few more minutes. Onto a plate of sesame seeds and then onto a scorching hot baking stone.

As I said, I've never had these before, so I don't know how close I got to the genuine NY style bagel, but let me tell you that Hamelman's recipe is pure genius. To me, these were awesome. They had that famous chewy exterior, and really pleasant hints of malted barley (both in the dough itself and from the syrup in the boiling water). Sorry, no cream cheese, but they were covered with French brie, some vegetables, and a couple of Pick salami slices. A little piece of bagel heaven right there :-)

 

Hamelman's bagels

Hamelman's bagels

 

Hamelman's bagels

Hamelman's bagels

ejm's picture
ejm

multigrain buns

The multigrain bread dough I made yesterday was turning out wonderfully. It was just the right consistency. It had risen to just the right level when it was time to shape it. I decided to make it into two loaves and four buns shaped like tabatières.

Tabatières?? I didn't know what those were either before reading Steve's (Bread cetera) post about making diadèmes (tiaras) by pushing tabatières (tobacco pouches) into a circular shape. Steve made videos, one of which clearly shows how to shape tabatières. Do take a look. In fact, take a look at his whole site! He makes the most wonderful bread!

The buns were delicious for breakfast!

To find out what happened with the loaves, read here.

Here is the recipe I used:


  • multigrain bread (This time, I added 2 Tbsp buckwheat flour and omitted the sunflower seeds.)

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I did it. I just went and ordered a better server for TFL. It'll be a major step up in every way: twice the RAM, 5 or 6 times the CPU, faster hard drives. It should considerably reduce the double posts and number of times when TFL feels slow.

As well as the move to the new machine, it'll also be an upgrade of OS, database, web server, and content management system. I hope all of these changes will result in improvements for the user experience here, but inevitably there will be some hiccups, new tricks to learn, and new bugs to fix. And so a new adventure begins...

If the new server comes online today I'm hoping to be ready to cut the site over to the new machine Tuesday or Wednesday.

Stay tuned.

Tulip1's picture
Tulip1

Hi everyone,

 What a wonderful blog.

There was an entry which said, I think, that kosher cake would not have butter.  I think this is inaccurate;  I have several kosher recipes which include butter--also butter substitutes, if the cake is to be eaten at a non-dairy meal (meat).

Tulip1

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Double knotted rolls - shaped 
Double knotted rolls - shaped 

 Rolls proofed 
Rolls proofed 

 Double knotted rolls - Baked 
Double knotted rolls - Baked  

Norm's formula for these rolls is here: 
http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/9536/double-knot-roll#comment-49092 

David 

rcornwall's picture
rcornwall

I was wondeering if anyone has a good sweet fougasse recipe they would like to share. Hope you can help.

chefryan

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