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Yippee's picture
Yippee

           
           
From 'The 65 C Bread Doctor",  by Yvonne Chen        
           
           
Water Roux Starter          
           
any amount is fine as long as bread flour 50 g    
the 1:5 ratio is followed water  250 g    
           
  Whisk both until well mixed        
  Heat it up on stove, keep stirring         
  until temperature reaches 65 C or 149 F        
  (Yippee uses the microwave, about 4 minutes, stir halfway.)     
  (Final product should leave a trail when stirred.)      
  Put a plastic wrap directly on top to prevent forming a 'skin'.    
  Must be cooled to at least room temperature before use.    
  Refrigerate up to 3 days.          
  Do not use if turns grey.        
           
           
Makes 1 big  loaf  (Yippee makes 2 smaller loaves)        
Original recipe uses water roux starter only, sponge not necessary.         
Yippee threw in an additional step of developing the sponge out of the total, see side column for her portions.    
           
          Yippee's Sponge
A. bread flour 474 g   350
  dry milk powder 15 g   15
  sugar 40 g    
  salt 9 g    
  yeast 10 g   7
B. milk 195 g   195
  water roux starter 156 g   Add at a small increament just enough to form the sponge
C. butter 40 g    
D. black sesame 50 g    
  (Yippee washes the sesame, leaves it out for 10 minutes before patting it dry with paper towels)    
           
Knead: Combine A. and B. until a ball is formed.         
  Add C. and knead until the dough passes the windowpane test.    
  (Yippee says:  use your judgment, each machine is different)    
  (Yippee kneads her dough in her Zojirushi breadmaker for 30 minutes.     
  Add D. at the last 5 minutes of kneading and knead slowly     
           
1st Fermentation: About 40 minutes at 28 C or 82.4 F, 75% humidity      
           
Divide:  into 5 pieces if making one big  loaf, each at 180 g      
  (Yippee makes 2 log loaves, each at 450g)        
           
Relax: 15 minutes at room temperature        
           
Shape: For one big loaf        
  Degas        
  Roll each dough into an oval        
  With the long side facing you:        
  Fold 1/3 from top to bottom, press to seal        
  Fold 1/3 from bottom to top, press to seal        
  Turn seam side down        
  Roll and elongate the dough to about 30cm or 12 "       
  Upside down and roll into a cylindrical shape        
  Seam side down, into the big loaf pan        
           
  For log loaves:        
  Shape like regular sandwich bread        
           
Final Proof: About 40 minutes at 38 C or 100.4 F, 85% humidity       
  (Yippee lets the dough rise for 20 more minutes to get a taller loaf)    
           
Bake: 350 F, 35-40 minutes        
  (Yippee uses whole egg wash)        
Yippee's picture
Yippee

Formula - Japanese Style White Sandwich Bread - Water Roux Starter / Sponge

 


http://www.flickr.com/photos/49353374@N06/sets/72157623866998940/show/


 



           
           
From 'The 65 C Bread Doctor" by Yvonne Chen        
           
           
Water Roux Starter          
           
any amount is fine bread flour 50 g    
as long as the 1:5 ratio is followed water  250 g    
           
  Whisk both until well mixed        
  Heat it up on stove, keep stirring         
  until temperature reaches 65 C or 149 F        
  (Yippee uses the microwave, about 4 minutes, stir halfway.)     
  (Final product should leave a trail when stirred.)      
  Put a plastic wrap directly on top to prevent forming a 'skin'.    
  Must be cooled to at least room temperature before use.    
  Refrigerate up to 3 days.          
  Do not use if turns grey.        
           
           
Makes 2 loaves          
Original recipe uses water roux starter only, sponge not necessary.         
Yippee threw in an additional step of developing the sponge out of the total, see side column for her portions.    
           
          Yippee's Sponge
A. bread flour 540 g   400
  sugar 86 g    
  salt 8 g    
  yeast 11 g   8
B. whole eggs 86 g   86
  whipping cream (can substitute with either half n half or milk) 59 g   59
  milk 54 g   54
  milk (recipe calls for flavor enhancer but Yippee uses milk instead) 9 g   9
           
  water roux starter 144 g   2 TBSP out of the 144g
C. butter 49 g    
           
Mix: Combine A. and B. until a ball is formed.         
  Add C. and knead until the dough passes the windowpane test.    
  (Yippee says:  use your judgment, each machine is different)    
  (Yippee kneads her dough in her Zojirushi breadmaker for 30 minutes.   
           
1st Fermentation: About 40 minutes at 28 C or 82.4 F, 75% humidity    
           
Scale:  into 4 pieces if making twin loaves, each at 265g      
  (Yippee makes 2 log loaves, each at 530g)        
Rest:          
  15 minutes at room temperature        
           
Shape: For twin loaves:        
  Degas        
  Roll into an oval        
  With the long side facing you:        
  Fold 1/3 from top to bottom, press to seal        
  Fold 1/3 from bottom to top, press to seal        
  Turn seam side down        
  Roll and elongate the dough to about 30cm or 12 "     
  Upside down and roll into a cylindrical shape      
  Seam side down, into the loaf pan        
           
  For log loaves:        
  Shape like regular sandwich bread        
           
Final Proof: About 40 minutes at 38 C or 100.4 F, 85% humidity     
  (Yippee lets the dough rise for 20 more minutes to get a taller loaf)    
           
Bake: Whole egg wash, no water added        
  350 F, 35-40 minutes        

 

 

Sponge preparation:

 

a.                   Use the ingredients listed on the side column, mixed until all are well incorporated

b.                  Leave at room temperature ~ 76-80F for an hour

c.                   Grease a food grade plastic bag, pour dough in, leave enough space to allow the dough to expand to about 160% of its size, reinforce the bag with double or triple bagging before tightening it, retard overnight

d.                  Subtract the above ingredients from the main formula, whatever remaining will be mixed at the 'Mix' stage with the sponge.  Follow the rest of the formula. 

 

However, if your dough feels cold after mixing due to the refrigerated sponge, instead of following the time suggested in the formula, watch your dough:

 

1st Fermentation:           Completes when the dough has risen to about 180% of its size

 

Final Proof:                   Completes when a dent is formed and very slowly bounces back

                                    when dough is poked with a floured finger

 

 

To make rolls:

Scale: 60g each

Bake: 350F, about 15 minutes

rest of the procedures unchanged

Choice of fillings, if preferred: bacon, roast chicken, cheese, red bean, pork, curry and custard cream.

Pictures of assorted buns I made before:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157617619002761/show

sharonk's picture
sharonk

I created these breads and bread recipes to cope with my own multiple food allergies and sensitivities. After mastering and enjoying old fashioned sourdough rye bread I learned I was gluten intolerant and could no longer eat rye. I learned I was also allergic to eggs and dairy products.

Wanting to continue eating bread, I looked at the ingredients in retail gluten free breads and found there was at least one ingredient I needed to avoid in each one. If I was going to be able to eat bread I needed to be able to control the ingredients.
I began experimenting with the sourdough techniques I had mastered for the rye bread.

Sourdough baking is a time tested bread baking technique that was used exclusively until the discovery of modern commercial yeast. It utilizes the natural yeasts and bacteria present on the grain and in the air to leaven bread. Sourdough bread becomes highly digestible because the flours are "soaked" in the starter and in the long rise period. Some people may remember their grandparents soaking oatmeal the night before cooking it for breakfast. Soaking neutralizes natural enzyme inhibitors in the grain, begins breaking down the tough cellulose fibers, fosters the formation of probiotics and enzymes and releases vitamins. All this makes for a more nutritious finished product that is easy on the digestion with many nutrients available for assimilation. Sourdough breads have a robust taste, long shelf life and freeze well.

For those of us who are gluten intolerant and have other food allergies these sourdough bread recipes can be a welcome addition to our diets.
The recipes in my gluten free recipe package are free of gluten, dairy, eggs, corn, soy, yeast, sugar, baking powder/soda, and xanthan and guar gums.
It can be purchased at: http://glutenfreesourdough.com

Free starter recipes on my personal blog: http://glutenfreesourdough.blogspot.com

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

It's been so long since I baked in a loaf pan.  This is just a simple recipe out of my Zo breadmachine book that I hand mixed useing 5 grain cereal mix and added some  K.A. organic white wheat and Bread Flour, reduced the yeast and added a little sourdough.  This is what I got...nice and tender sandwich loaf with a bit of fiber and a nice flavor. 




Sylvia  

SulaBlue's picture
SulaBlue

Modified from Toxo Bread's Ale and Cheddar Bread which I found via Wild Yeast. As made they have a very faint beer flavor and a mild tang of sourdough. The cheese offers up surprise bites of salty goodness. I think if I were to make this again I'd replace some of the water in the final dough with beer for a stronger beer flavor, and possibly add more cheese, possibly sprinkled over the top half-way through baking as well. I've got all sorts of variations I'd like to try with this, including upping the whole grain content if I can do so without sacrificing the crumb. That might involve incorporating an overnight soaker as well.


 


Pre-Dough


280g 100% Hydration starter


125g Guinness 


50g Stone Ground Whole Wheat Flour


75g Bread Flour


 


Final Dough


- All of Pre-Dough


-660g Bread Flour


-360g Water, Lukewarm


-12g salt


-About 80g Sharp Cheddar


 


 


1. Mix starter and luke warm Guinness, add in flours. Allow to sit at room temperature until the starter becomes very bubbly and foamy - about 3-4 hours.


2. Add water to Pre-Dough, then flours. Knead for about 10 minutes, adding as little flour as possible, until dough becomes silky. Let rest 5 mins then knead in salt and cheese.


3. Allow dough to nearly double in size. Divide dough in half and shape into desired shape. Allow dough to proof until it has almost doubled again.


4. Preheat oven to 475F and when oven is hot, bake for 5 minutes at 475, then lower temperature to 450F and bake until internal temperature reaches 200-205F, about 20 minutes.


 


 


 


The crumb isn't quite as dense as it looks here. My cheese was very finely grated so didn't leave very many big holes due to that. It's hard to describe - it's very close, but not heavy or dense. Instead it has a plethora of tiny little air bubbles that have left it with a light mouth-feel to it.

gothicgirl's picture
gothicgirl

Poted on www.evilshenanigans.com on 4/20/2009


If given the choice of any dessert I want, I almost always pick the cookie.  I adore them.  During the Holidays I tend to eat and bake so many cookies that I get a little tired of them and I can't stand to make them until Spring is fully underway. 


Almond and Chocolate Filled Butter Cookies


These cookies have a delicious secret hidden in them.  A mixture of ground almonds, mini-chocolate chips, vanilla sugar, and cinnamon.   I love little suprises like this in my desserts.  People always think you slaved to make something so impressive, but I must confess ... these are so easy to make!  The dough is supple and easy to work with, and they hold the filling well. 


Fresh From the Oven 


Once baked they maintain their shape well, and once cool completly are sturdy little things.  The dough is not terribly sweet, it is more like a pie dough than a cookie dough in many aspects, so the dusting of powdered sugar is a welcome addition.  If you do not want to roll or dust your cookies, and often I feel that step is one step too many myself,  feel free to add a tablespoon or two of additional sugar to the dough.


These cookies are crisp, buttery, delicate, and remarkable good.  They keep for as many as five days in an air tight container on the counter.   


Almond and Chocolate Filled Butter Cookies 


Plus, they just look darn pretty!


Almond and Chocolate Filled Butter Cookies   Yield 36 cookies


Dough:


2 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons vanilla sugar (or 2 tabplesoons sugar with 1/2 teaspoon of vanilla)
1 cup salted butter
2 tablepsoons milk
1 tablespoon water


Filling:


1/2 cup ground almonds
1/3 cup vanilla sugar
3 tablespoons mini-chocolate chips
1 1/2 teaspoons water


Powdered sugar for dusting


Heat the oven to 350 F and line two baking sheets with parchment paper.


Filling 


Mix the almonds with the sugar, chocolate chips and water.  Mix well and set aside.


Making the Dough Dough


In the bowl of a food processor add the flour, cinnamon, sugar, milk, water, and butter.  Pulse the mixture until it forms a ball.  You may need to add up to an additional tablespoon of water.


Dough Rolled into a Log Roll the Dough


Roll the dough into a log about 18″ long, then cut into 1/2″ slices.  Roll each slice into a ball.


Starting the Cup Formed into a Cup  


Take one ball of doug, press your finger into the center, then shape the ball into a cup. 


Filled CupPull the Edges InPinch the SeamAll Rolled Up  


Fill each cup with a little of the filling then pinch the dough closed.  Roll gently between your palms to round the ball and place seam side down on the prepared pans.  Repeat with the remaining dough.


Ready to BakeFresh From the Oven  


Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until lightly golden.  Cool completly on the pan.


Almond and Chocolate Filled Butter Cookies 


Roll in powdered sugar before serving.


Almond and Chocolate Filled Butter Cookies

Yippee's picture
Yippee

This was created by accident.  Meant to bake a 100% whole wheat loaf but must be dozing off when I added the remaining 30% flour to the sponge:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157616485135015/show/


http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157616485135015/

Yippee's picture
Yippee

My first cherry pie for a colleague's birthday:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/3333069287/sizes/o/in/set-72157616398612359/


Forgot to take a picture before cutting it.


 

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