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johannesenbergur's picture
johannesenbergur

Ingredients:

  • 1 dl (100g) lukewarm to warm water
  • ½ dl (50g) plain naturel yogurt
  • 15g fresh active yeast
  • 8 g honey
    (pref. liquid)
  • 10 g sea salt
  • 10 g olive oil
    (this is a minimum, feel free to use more, I reckon 25g would be ideal)
  • 250g various types of flour, I used and recommend:
    30g Graham flour
    70g semolina flour
    150g wheat baking flour
  • Poppy or sesame seeds or for sprinkle

This recipe is very small, the smallest I've ever made. Usually I double the ingredients mentioned, except for the yeast, the dough rises just fine with 15g.

Recipe:

(Work: 20 mins - 1st rise: 30 mins - work: 5 mins - 2nd rise: 35 mins - bake: 30 mins)
Estimated time from start to finish: 2 hours 

Mix the warm water and yogurt, so you get a tepid mixture. Add the yeast and stir till dissolved. Add salt and honey and dissolve. Add the flour to the mixture, I ususally add 100g, mix and add then add more.

Knead the dough for approximately 10 minutes, put it into an oiled container, cover it with a hot teatowel and leave it to rise for 30 mins or so, can be more or less, usually more means better and less means less good.

Should be doubled after half an hour and shape it into a loaf. Place the loaf onto your baking surface of choice. Pat the bread with milk and sprinkle the seeds on top of it. Cover it again with a warm towel and let it rise for 30-60 minutes; Afterwards put the loaf into your oven.

Bake for approximately 30 minutes, until the crust is golden and it makes that hollow sound you know so well, when you knock on the bottom of it.

Enjoy.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

We've been traveling a lot the past few months, and I haven't had many weekends at home to bake. Now, we'll be home for a few weeks, and I can bake more regularly. This weekend, I baked two of my current favorites – the SFBI Miche and Hamelman's Pain au Levain. (See: Miche from SFBI Artisan II - 2 kg. The formula for the Pain au Levain is found in Hamelman's "Bread.")

After a long, cool Spring, we're starting to get some Summer weather. It's been in the low 90's. Temperatures of 105ºF are predicted for the middle of the coming week. Frankly, I could do without the 105º days, but my starter and doughs are enjoying the warmer kitchen temperature. My old dictum - “Watch the dough, not the clock” - was applied. For example, the pain au levain, which Hamelman says to proof for 2 1/2 hours was ready to bake in 90 minutes after shaping. I feared the bâtards were a bit over-proofed, but the oven spring and bloom I got suggest proofing was pretty much on target.

SFBI Miche

Miche crust

Miche crumb

Pain au Levain

Pain au Levain, up close

One thing I learned and applied for this bake of the pain au levain: The last few bakes of this bread have had many excessively large holes. I suspected this was due to insufficient de-gassing before pre-shaping. So, this time, I de-gassed a bit more vigorously. I like the results.

 

Pain au Levain crumb

Happy Baking! And Happy Father's Day to all you fathers!

David

 

Salilah's picture
Salilah

Oops - another failure

I was trying to make Daisy's Wholemeal Lemon Sourdough (original successful recipe here)

Not sure what particularly went wrong - my assumption is that
a) I left the preferment too long
b) I used slightly unripe starter
c) I left the mixed dough too long for bulk ferment
d) the S&F method didn't work so well for wholewheat as for white
e) I didn't knead enough
f) the gods were not smiling :-)

I shaped the dough into small loaves - 20mins into proofing and oops - disintegrating dough!

There was no surface tension when shaping...

I decided to pop them in the oven anyway - 30mins at 220C

They smelled great - and tasted OK - but pretty awful rise (i.e. almost none) - it's "back to the bricks", and just when I thought I was doing well...

So - not one of my best examples!  Never mind - I'm still learning!

Sali

ananda's picture
ananda

Double Pains de Campagne, Olive Levain and a “Hardcore Borodinsky”

One large Boule, proved in a banneton, of just over 1300g, and one of 700g, proved in a brotform.

Olive Levain takes its inspiration from the Hamelman (2004) version on pp. 178 – 179, but with changes sufficient for me to feel happy publishing the formula and method I have devised.

As if Borodinsky isn’t hardcore with an 80:20 Rye: Wheat mix, this is all Dark Rye Flour!

Here’s the detail of the leaven refreshment used for the stiff levain used in the Pain de Campagne and Olive Levain.   Bonus of being able to make a couple of Naan breads with the leaven after first build to accompany yesterday’s evening meal of saag dal and aloo gobhi and brinjal curry.

Material

Recipe [grams]

1. Leaven Build One [Friday; 19:00]

 

Leaven from Stock

80 [50 flour: 30 water]

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

100

Water

60

TOTAL

240

Reserved to make Naan Breads

210

2. Leaven Build Two [Saturday; 14:00]

 

Leaven [from above]

30 [19 flour: 11 water]

Organic White Flour

300

Water

180

TOTAL

510

 

 

3. Leaven Build Three [Saturday; 20:00]

 

Leaven from above

510 [319 flour: 191 water]

Organic White Flour

300

Water

180

TOTAL

990

4. Retarded overnight for use Sunday morning

110 back to stock

Leaven in Pain de Campagne

720 [450 flour: 270 water]

Leaven in Olive Levain

160 [100 flour: 60 water]

 

 

  1. 1.    Pain de Campagne

High percentage of pre-fermented flour in a really strong, stiff wheat leaven.   Dark Rye added at just over 9% of total flour.   Two loaves, scaled as mentioned above.

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Leaven [see above]

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

37.5

450

Water

22.5

270

TOTAL

60

720

 

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

53.33

640

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

9.17

110

Salt

1.75

21

Water

45.5

546

TOTAL

169.75

2037

% pre-fermented flour

37.5

-

Overall % hydration

68

-

 

Method:

  • Autolyse the 2 flours with the water for half an hour.
  • Mix the dough by adding the leaven to the autolyse and developing for 10 minutes.   Rest for 10 minutes; add the salt and develop a further 10 minutes.
  • Bulk Ferment for 2¼ hours.
  • Scale and divide for 2 boules as described above.   Shape and place upside down in the banneton and brotform.   Retard for 2 hours in the chiller.
  • Final proof for 1½ hours.
  • Tip the largest loaf out, cut the top and bake with steam in a pre-heated oven [250*C] for 55 minutes.   Drop the oven temperature as needed through the bake, ending up around 200*C, depending on your oven.  Cool on wires and bake the smaller loaf for 25 minutes again, cut the loaf and utilise steam.   Cool on wires.

 

  1. 2.    Olive Levain

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Leaven [see above]

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

20

100

Water

12

60

TOTAL

32

160

 

 

 

Marriage’s Organic Strong White Flour

72

360

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

8

40

Salt

1.2

6

Water

51

255

Pitted Black Olives

25

125

TOTAL

189.2

946

% pre-fermented flour

20

-

Overall % Hydration

63

-

 

Method:

  • Dry the Pitted Olives with paper towel.
  • Mix the leaven with all the other ingredients except the olives.   Develop for 10 minutes, then rest 10 minutes, develop a further 10 minutes and rest 10 more minutes.
  • Chop the olives into the dough with a metal cutter.
  • Bulk Proof for 3 hours.
  • Shape and prove in a banneton for 2½ hours.
  • Tip out the dough piece, cut the top and bake in a pre-heated oven [250°C] using steam, for 45 minutes, dropping the oven temperature to 200°C as the bake progresses.
  • Cool on wires.

 

  1. 3.    “Hardcore Borodinsky”

I have been out of stock of the Bacheldre Dark Rye, so my rye sour was in need of some “tlc” before I could bake with it.   I used a 2 stage refreshment process, and incorporated some “altus” as part of the second refreshment.   I used some old Borodinsky as the “altus”.   This was left overnight for a full 15 hours to ripen.

Material

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sour First Build; Friday 19:00

 

Rye Sourdough stock

16

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

50.25

Water

83.75

TOTAL

150

 

 

2. Rye Sour Second Build; Saturday 14:30

 

Rye Sourdough from above

150

“Altus” – Old Bread

50

Soaking Water

100

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

200

Water

300

TOTAL

800

 

As usual, I made a “scald” for this loaf the evening before, as follows:

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

20

192

Organic Barley Malt Syrup

4.5

43

Organic Black Strap Molasses

6

58

Coriander freshly ground

1

9.6

Salt

1

9.6

Boiling Water

35

336

TOTAL

67.5

648

 

Method:

  • Dissolve the syrups in the boiling water and bring to a rolling boil in a pan
  • Crush the Coriander Seeds using a Mortar and Pestle
  • Combine spice with salt and flour and pour on the boiling wort.
  • Mix to a stiff paste, cover, and cool overnight.

 

Material

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1. Rye Sour [as above[

 

 

Dark Rye [plus a little “altus”]

30

288

Water

50

480

TOTAL

80

768

 

 

 

2. “Scald” [as above]

67.5

648

3. Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

50

480

TOTAL

197.5

1896

% pre-fermented flour

30

-

Overall % Hydration

85

-

 

Method:

  • Blend the scald into the sourdough.
  • Combine this with the remaining flour.
  • Bulk ferment for 1 hour
  • Prepare a Pullman Pan and drop the shaped paste into the pan.
  • Prove for 3 hours until the dough is near the top of the pan.
  • Close the lid of the pan and bake in an oven pre-heated to 160°C with generous steam, very gently for 2½ hours.
  • Cool on wires.

 

The production schedule worked well for these loaves, with some retarding for the 2 Pains de Campagne.   I woke early, so I did make the Borodinsky at 05:30.   It’s a stressful time just now!

 

Lots of photographs are attached.   I apologise that they are indoor shots.   The weather here is very poor, with lots of heavy showers, and black skies leaving all our rooms very dark indeed.   Just no chance to get outside, despite very occasional glimpses of sunshine!

Very best wishes to all

Andy

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

My croissant project is coming along nicely. I have been practicing on croissant/laminated dough for the past couple of months. The results are getting more consistent and predictable.

I usually make the laminated dough and shape few of them into croissants and the rest to something else (for change and variety). This week I made whole wheat laminated dough and made them into chocolate croissant. 

I made the chocolate croissants several times before by using the dough scraps, trimming from croissants shaping. They also worked fine with those scrap and was perfect way to used up those dough trimmings.

Full post and recipe is here.  

Sue

http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

I’ve been giving more attention to cooking than baking lately.   I’m trying to expand my Asian cooking experience, and Thai food and Korean food go best with rice, not bread.  But I did manage to bake some baguettes and a variation on the Tartine Basic Country Bread this weekend.

It had been many months since I’d made any baguettes besides proth5’s “Bear-guettes”.   I decided to try again the sweet baguettes from the recipe Janedo got from Anis Bouabsa, as reported by Brother David back in 2008 (http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/9839/ficelles-made-anis-bouabsa039s-baguette-formula”).  I remember that trying to shape this wet sticky dough gave me fits the first time.  Like wrestling snakes made of tar.  This time it was easier, mostly because I have had more tar-snake experience in the interim.  

[

These are not the best looking or best tasting baguettes I’ve made.  The crumb was not as open as I’d like and the crust was not as crunchy as it should be.  I will try to handle them more gently next time and bake them a bit bolder.   I also think I just like my baguette in sourdough flavor.

The Tartine Basic Country Bread is my favorite lean sourdough bread.  Crunchy crust; moist and tender crumb.  I could eat it every day.  But, I’ve been thinking it might be even better with a bit more whole wheat flour.  So I tried it today with 15% whole wheat, instead of the 10% the formula calls for.  I like it.  I might even go for 20% next time…or maybe add some wheat germ. 

I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again: the crumb on this bread is just what I’m looking for.  If I could keep it from going stale, I’d make a pillow out of it.

In case anyone’s interested, here’s a look at the sweet and spicy Korean Chicken I made this week.   Korean chile paste is pretty darn spicy.  This was almost eye-watering.   Good though.

Glenn

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

For some time I have been looking for German bread formulas, although not systematically. Some time ago I came across Meister Süpke's Blog about sourdough, and setting up a German group at my Son's school gave me finally the incentive to try out Mr Süpke's formulas for bread using the "Detmolder Einstufen-Führung" as I agreed to provide the bread.

Bread according to these formulas (see German Baking Day) can be made with various amounts of wheat and rye using a stiff rye starter at 80% hydration that has been refreshed with 5%-10% mature starter and kept at 24C to 28C for 12 to 18 hours. The Detmolder single step process uses a small amount of commercial yeast in the final dough.

The yeast content raised some questions: Is it necessary? Is the bread loosing sourdough characteristics? Are the bakers in Germany giving up quality in favor of quantity?

From Meister Süpke I got the answer that he could make the bread without yeast added, but in order to get through his schedule he has one hour for the final proof, which is being archieved by adding 1% yeast or less.

Another answer comes from Daniel DiMuzio's book Breadmaking: For some formulas he says one can add up to 0.7% of instant yeast without changing the character of the bread significantly, e.g. p.232, San Francisco Style Sourdough

Well, I wanted to know if the yeast does more than cutting the prooving times short, so I did some comparative baking.

First some pictures.

The 60% Rye loaves:

 

The 30% and 100% rye loaves:

 

Conclusion:

Quite surprisingly, there is hardly any noticeable difference in the appearance the bakes with and without yeast. The slightly higher volume of the loaves with altus are due to the additional amount of altus in the dough, I didn't scale those down to 500g.

The loaves with altus were also a bit chewier and tasted more earthy. There was a slight difference between the 60% rye with and without yeast, the sourdough only version being milder. And the 100% rye with yeast maintained a bit of the starter's fruity notes.

The only striking difference loies in the times for the final proof, as shown in the table with the formulas below.

This experiment would suggest that the yeast is not necessary, but it is a great tool to fit this type of bread into a production schedule without the loss of quality. I would be very interested to hear if anyone has different experiences.

Now to some details about the process:

Starters:

All the breads in this comparison call for a rye starter with 80% hydration. For the 60% rye batch I used wholegrain rye flour, for the others I used light rye flour (Type 997). I am maintaining a liquid wholegrain rye "mother" at 200% hydration, which is very reliable and worked well as a seed culture.

The starters were made in two elaborations (same process for wholegrain and light rye starters):

 1. 100% flour, 80% water, 10% mother fermented at 24C for 16 hours

2. 100% flour, 80% water, 10% starter from (1) fermented at 24C for 16 hours

This way the original liquid "mother" makes up just 1% of the starter - no worries about the wrong hydration or grain. The starters rose well to about four times their original volume, and had a nice tangy smell. The light rye starter developed a very nice fruity-flowery smell.

The altus (fresh "old bread", 80% rye) has been added to the water for the 2nd elaboration to soak. No aditional water added. There was very little difference in the starter consistency with and without altus.

Ingredient100% Rye100% Rye + Yeast60% Rye60% Rye + Yeast60% Rye + Altus60% Rye + Yeast + Altus30% Rye30% Rye + Yeast
Straight Formula, in baker's percent
Wholegrain Rye  60606060  
Light Rye100100    3030
Wholegrain Wheat  8888  
White Wheat  323232327070
Water7878747474747171
Salt22222222
Instant Yeast 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3
Altus    1010  
Yield180180.3176176.3186186.3173173.3
Wholegrain Rye from starter  25252525  
Light Rye from starter3535    1818
Final Dough, in grams
Wholegrain Rye  186186186186  
Light Rye187187    3636
Wholegrain Wheat  25252525  
White Wheat  99999999209209
Water144144167167167167169169
Salt5.75.76.26.26.26.266
Instant Yeast 1 1 1 1
Altus    1010  
Starter1811811411411411419797
Timing in minutes,
Ambient Temperature28C28C27C27C27C27C24C28C
Bulk Rise4040404040404030
Final Proof65501037484569060
codruta's picture
codruta

I took cranbo suggestion and made this loaf with my new starter, using flo's 1.2.3. method. This is how my bread turned out. I'd say it's very pretty. It is more sour than my regular breads, but I eat a slice a few hours after baking it, so I guess the aroma wasn't fully settled. Tomorrow I'l be able to feel the real flavor, I hope.

I had a new starter that I never used, some oat flour that needed to be used asap. For this loaf I used 150g 100% starter, 300g water, 100g whole wheat flour (organic) 80g oat flour, and 270g bread flour, 10g salt. It was 71% hydration, but easier to handle than I would imagine. I did two S/F during 50 minutes (for a 2h 30 min bulk fermentation) then shape, then one hour at room temperature and 8 hours in the fridge. I took it out of the fridge one hour before baking it. The dough had 900g, and the loaf 760g. I'd never guessed that so much water evaporates during baking..?!

I'll post the complete recipe soon at my blog Apa.Faina.Sare.

Codruta

hanseata's picture
hanseata



Hazel

Little Nut

In 2008 I stuck some fresh hazelnuts in the ground at different places in our yard. I also gave some to our friend Tamara for her gorgeous garden. In spring 2009 I checked for weeks the planting sites, but nothing showed, only some more weeds.

I don't bother too much about those, and when my husband complains about our untidy lawn, I say: "Green is green!" This motto was already an annoyance to my neighbors when I was living in Germany. My eco-friendly garden was a fertile breeding ground for dandelion and burning nettle seeds, and other horticultural threats that law abiding, Round-Up toting garden owners abhor.

Last year I looked at some puny rhubarbs planted many years ago along the fence before cedars and maples blocked the sun. I noticed a seedling with round, serrated leaves that seemed familiar. After almost two years a hazelnut had sprouted! Though I scanned every centimeter of our yard for more, it was the only one. But Tamara gave me another nut-ling, she got several of them.

My two little hazelnuts cheerfully grew more leaves, while I watched them like a hawk, knowing my Richard's merciless efficiency with the lawnmower. They survived last winter, buried by tons of snow, and outgrew their yogurt container collars (protection from certain people to who believe that nature should be "beaten into submission").

With some luck, and if some people - I name no names - keep their greedy weed whackers off them, "Hazel" and "Little Nut" will grow into nice, big bushes, providing us with an abundance of delicious nuts. Unless our fat squirrels eat them first!

And this is it why I need hazelnuts:

The photo shows a pecan version of the delicious Hazelnut Mini Bread. Both recipes you find here:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/23952/karin039s-pecan-mini-breads

 

 

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

Recipe is from KAF(http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/parmesan-batter-bread-recipe), I used instant yeast rather than active dry, which means I could skip the "warm milk to proof" bit, and make the whole thing even easier. Also skipped the cream cheese on surface, since I didn't have any. Very delicious though, a good base for all kinds of add-ins, next time I will try green onion and bacon.

 

I highly recommend using a cast iron pan to make this, the crust is perfection

 

And a fluffy soft delicious crumb

 

Sending this to Yeastspotting.

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